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Full text of "Compute! Magazine Issue 129"

HOW TO CHOOSE A HARD DISK 




T 



YOUR.C£iMPLETE HOME COMPUTER RESOUkv. 



41 GREAT PC TOOLS! 

HACK IN THE USSR:' 
GLASNOST BITS 



MrodudngGeo 

The Incredibly Easy Way Tb 

DoMoreTOthJ^PGInThe 

Office Or At Home. 



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Iiilrn(]urin<r<TriAV<)rks Fjispinlilc'": a set ol'si^vpii 
nii[)lirn1i<ins workifi^nti liiinininy in ;in aiiiazin^^nviphiral 
\vifnt()\viHL!'<'jivii'(nnii*Mil riillcd P( 7(1 ["IDS. 



PCCommrttig 




Works Ensemble: 








What Vou Sam Is What Vou Omr CWYSIWYO) 
Om-Sor^km Afua On Anv PmNTSPi. DoT'MATiiiit To Laswi. 



PC/GEOS packs the latest lechnolog)^ into sollwiU'e that's 
so uicredil)ly snuill and fas!, it nin.s rings around other giu|)iik'cij 
emironments. And it does it on any liard disk ecjnippod V(], From 
an ordinary XT io a ■^Hi^. 

^^^^^^^^^^Q Whether yonVe a PC no\-iee 
a PC expert, Geo\\\)rks Ensemble makes it easy to get profes- 
sional results. 

The seerel is the world s first Scalable 
User InleifaceJ" a two-level way of working 
uitli applications thai actuiilly adjusts to your 
computer expertise. 
Instead of th(M)th(4^ 
way ju^onnd. 

For home oi' 
occasional users. 
applications in tlie 
easy AppliiUK-e level 
have a simple set of 
choices, clearly sho^^'n 
in push-bulton fonn on-screen. For business or advanced users 
there's the Professional level where applications have \n\\\vr that 
rivals stand iilone programs. 

Our Scalable User Interface makes new softw^are easier to 
leam. And insure.s that evenone can get results m minutes. It's a 
new way of computing that makes so much sense, you'll wonder 
whv no one else thoughl of it. 



INCREDIBLY 



Geo^\t)^ks Ensembles advtUiced imaging and printing technol- 
ogy' makes everything you create look professionally published. 

Its built -in outline fonts give text I he smne smoothly drawn, 
professional look (tna* WYSIWYG) on-.sci-een and on your [)rinten 
In an aniazmg 788 sizes. 4 pt to 79^ pt. And whether you have 
a dot-matrix, ink jel. or laser printer, you'll always get text mid 
graphics thai look typeset. Berause our technolo^' is jmMisely 
tuned to tlie maximuiu resolution 
of over 800 printers. Use Geo Works 
Ensemble andwa'D never fiddle with 
font cartridges or printer codes again. 



small business ^ 

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Quite simply, Geo Works Ensemble makes it easy for anyone 

to look tlieir professional best. With dazzling documents. From 

j)re.sentations. to pn)posals. to tenn |)apers. 

■ I.IJ IJ.II IMJ.IIBlima ^^■or6 pmce.i„g/ 

desktop pnl)lishing, file managfMuent. communications, diwving, 
a calendtn'/scheduler. electronic address book, notepad and more. 
GeoWbrks Enseml)le puts a complete, graphical multi-task- 
^^' ing world of soths'are al your fingertips. A world ^iiere data 

is shared instantly betAveen seven applications. 

All of which can be mnningat the same time. 

It even auto- 
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Tb delete a tile 

or directon; for 

example, simply 

pick up ils |)icture 

and place it in the 

wastebasket. Or 

to lamicb Lotus® 
1-2-3® (or cuiy DOS a|.ii)licalion). 
simply point to it and click. 

For under $200, (leoW^orks 
Ensemble helps you gel more 
done faster by gi\1ng you the 
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For ever\1hing from office - 
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Communications 



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Circle Reader Service Number 152 



COIUIPUTE 



MAY 1991 



VOLUME 1 3 • NO. 5 • ISSUE 1 29 



Editorial License 6 

PETER SCISCO 

This issue QfCOMPi'TE has some 
exciting changes. Here's a road map lo 
whaf s neu' inside. 
News & Notes 8 

ALAN R. BECHTOLD 
IBM moves into muliimedia in a big 
way. Ashton-Taie loses a major court 
battle against Fox Software. Loius l-^- 
i visits Mother Russia, an 82-\rar- 
old retired Na\7 captain makes some 
e.Kciting discoveries, computer consul- 
tants get a new labor law. faster laptops 
may be on the horizon, and more. 

Feedback 16 

READERS 

Reverse engineering a classic, why a 
VIC-20 and an AT don't get along, 
looking for program listings, changing 
the border on a VGA monitor. 286 
buying dilemma, and more. 

SharePak 28 

RICHARD C.LEiNECKER 
Put a move on Windoivs files with 
Click! Filer, design \oiir own [Vin- 
dows icons ttith PBkon, make your 
home budget work with PCBi'DGEl 
and create a world-class resume \^ith 
Resume Pro fesuona!. 

COMPUTE Readership 

Survey 58 

How are we doing? This issue's sun'ey 
gives you an opponunii)' to let us 
know what you think about the maga- 
zine. You'll also get a chance to tell us 
a little about yourself— what kind of 
computers and peripherals you use and 
what vour interests are. 



IN FOCUS 



State of Computing: 

Europe 20 

J.ACK SCHOFIELD 
From his home in the U.K. Jack Scho- 
field takes a hard look at home com- 
puting in Europe, especially in the 
U.K., Germany, and France. Unlike 
the United States, which, despite its di- 
versity, still has one predominant lan- 
guage and culture, Europe has a 
computing community which is com- 
plex, with its host of languages and dif- 
fering cultural altitudes. IBM, Apple, 
Commodore, and Atari are the big 
players, ^ith PC compatibles making 
great gains in the last few years. 




ON THE COVER 

Artist Doug Struthers created this issue's cover with a Silicon 

Graphics Personal Iris workstation. This machine's powerful 

geometry engine is fueled by a MIPS RISC chip, 32MB of RAM, 

and a 1 .2 gigabyte disk drive. Doug used nis own software to 

model the image, which is based on spline surfaces, not more 

commonly used polygons. The finished image is 4000 pixels high 

by 4000 pixels wide and four bytes deep. 



COMPUTE Yoof CompfBto Home Computer Resource (ISSN 019*-357X) is publishecf monthly in 
the United States and Canada by COW PUTS Pubficatons (nternati^nal Ltd , 1965 Broadway, New 
Yc<k, NY 10023-5965 Uiluma l3, Number 5. Issi^e ^2B Copyrigm © 1991 by COMPUTE Publicatioris 
fnternatwna! Lid, Alt rkghti reserved, Tel (21 3 J 496^100, COMPUTE is a registered trademark of 
COMPUTE PuWtcaihons lr-ierrwiiof\3l Ltd- Printed in the USA and distntxAed vwDrtdwide by Curbs 
Circulation Conpany, PO Box 9102, Pennsauken, NJ OS 109. Sec^nd-ctass postage paid at New 
Yo-k. NY and at addrtiofial rraJir\g offices, POSTMASTER: Ser>d eikfresa chengee to COMPUTE 
Magazifw. PO Box 3245 Harian, (A 51537-3041. Tel, (SOQi 727-6917 Entire contents copyr»gfited 
AV figrits reserved Notrvng may be reproduced m who*© or in pan wiilxxit written permission from the 
pi;t>isher Sudscnpiions US, AFO- $19 Wane year; Canada and e!s*JWl>sfe-S25 9d one ywir &ngte 
ccp*es S2-95 irt US The puWiSher dtsciairrts aH responsibiliiy to return unsobdted matter, and aM f igni* 
in porbors pubtsfted tnereoi remain the sote propertv of COMPUTE PudlicatKyis !nternatiOf«! Ltd 
Letters sent to COMPUTE or its edrtofs become me pfcpefty of th€r magaima Editofial eWces are 
locatsd at 324 West Weodover Afervue. Sume 200. Green&boro, NC 27408 Td- (919) 275-9809. 



Computing in the Other 
Eurape 30 

KRISTEN STERNBERG 
From the vantage point of a traveler 
behind the Iron Curtain, Kristen Stem- 
bci]g illuminales the computing land- 
scape of the Soviet Union, In a country 
where bread and meat are in short sup- 
ply, can personal computer tet;hnology 
provide tangible benefits? 

TEST LAB 

Seven Systems Go 

Head to Head 33 

Our all-new Test Lab makes its debut 
with detailed analysis of seven com- 
puter systems ranging from superlight 
laptops to high-powered desktops. We 
took systems from Packard Bell, 
LASER Computer, Tandy, Zeos, 
Sanyo, Sun Moon Star, and Veridata; 
ran each through a grueling series of 
benchmarks; and gave each unit to a 
COMPUTE editor for a handsK)n, in- 
depth review. If you're in the market 
for a new PC, don't miss this roundup, 

TECH SUPPORT 
How to Choose a Hard 
Disk 60 

MARKMIN.ASl 

Choosing the right hard disk is a tricky 
business. Do you want an ST506, 
ESDI, SCSI, or IDE interface? What 
kind of encoding is best—MFNf or 
RLL? is 65 megabyies large enough? 
This information-packed feature has 
cvef)thing you need to know to make 
the right hard disk choice. 

Disk Update 66 

JOYCE SIDES 

How to draw without a mouse in 
TurboPaint, why the PC Disk is dtiTer- 
ent, making the Star Blaster com^- 
tion with a Tandy, solving a 
DlSKTH-iK dWtmmi, and more. 

Tips & Tools 67 

READERS 

Don't be bashful about using FOR 
loops in batch files, find hidden Win- 
dows icons, design your own tower sys- 
tem, speed up dBase, double-time your 
data with a cache, and more. 

Programming Power 69 

TOM CAMPBELL 
Find the strings hidden inside EXE, 
COM, and OBJ fdes with this month's 
super QuickBASIC pto^m. Snooper, 



An eclipse is spectacular 

BOTH IN THE HEAVENS AND ON THE ROAD. 




Enter the Mitsubishi "total eclipse sweepstakes" 

and both can be yours 



WIN: A trip to Hawaii to see a total solar eclipse, the 
most spectacular celestial event in the past 150 years. Plus, 
you'll also... 

WIN: A new 1991 Mitsubishi Eclipse, the most spec- 
tacular sports coupe on the road 

On July 1 1,1991 , a total solar eclipse will be visible from the 
Hawaiian islands. Enter the Mitsubishi "Total Eclipse Sweepstakes" 
and you could win a trip to see it aboard a luxury cruise ship! Round 



trip air fare, hotel accommodations and cruise passage for 
two are included. All courtesy of Mitsubishi Motors. 

Upon your return home, you'll receive a new Mitsubishi 
Eclipse sports coupe-an exciting climax to the entire 
experience. Enter Mitsubishi's "Total Eclipse Sweepstakes" 

Si*" MITSUBISHI QQ 

May 31 , 1991 . The word is getting around." W^S 



— ENTER MITSUBlSHrS "TOTAL ECLIPSE SWEEPSTAKES" TODAY! ENTRY DEAD LINE-MAY 31, 1991. — 



No purchase required. To enter, complete the entry form per instructions 
Of hand print your name, street address and daytime telephone number 
on a 3" X 5" piece of paper and mail it to: Mitsubishi "Total Eclipse 
Sweepstakes," P.O. Box 543, Gibbstown, NJ 08027. Entries must be 
received by 5/31/91. Open to residents of the United States 18 and 
older. Must have valid driver's license to win the Mitsubishi Eclipse. 
Void where prohibited. Alternate travel dates are not available. Odds of 
winning are determined by the number of eligible entries received. For 
complete rules, send a self-addressed stamped envelope to: Mitsubishi 
"Total Eclipse Sweepstakes" Rules, P.O. Box 595, Gibbstown, NJ 
08027,by 5/1 5/91 . Residents of WA and VT may omit return postage. 



NAME. 



ADDRESS- 
CITY 



-STATE. 



ZIP. 



DAYTIME PHONE ( ). 



CQIUIPUTE 



Point & Click 71 

CLIFTON KARNES 
Why is Asymetrix's Toolhook so hot? 
It's more than jusi HyperCard for 
Windows, It's an objecl-oriented envi- 
ronment, but uith a l^^isl. 
Faces, Fonts, and Points 72 

WILLIAM HARREL 
Take a laser printer, add the expert ad- 
vice found m this feature, mix well 
and you'll produce dazzling docu- 
ments ever>' time. 
Online 77 

GEORGE CAMPBELL 

There's a wealth of medical and health 
information online, if you just know 
where lo look. 

Hardware Clinic 78 

MARK MINASI 

Should your dream system be powered 
by a 386DX or an SX? The answer 
may surprise you. 

IntroboS 80 

TONY ROBERTS 
With DOS's little-known pipes, you 
can make your files go and do what 
you wzn\ them to. And [X)S's filters 
can help you display files in ways that 
are the most useful. 

Arts & Letters 81 

ROBERT BIXBY 

Many people think the Windows 3.0 
environment is the last word for graph- 
ics programs. Our resident expert has 
ideas of hts own. 

HOIWE OFFICE 

Workplace 82 

DANIEL JANAL 

If you can t find a publisher for your 
book, why not publish it yourself? 
Here's a blow-by-blow account of ex- 
actly how it's done. 
The Essential Home Office 
Tooibox 84 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 
Four top professionals— contributing 
editors Tony Roberts. Geoige Camp- 
bell, Alan R, Bechtold, and Tom 
Campbell— give us the inside stors' on 
their favorite interfaces, word proces- 
sors, telecommunications software, 
utilities, disk managers, databases, 
spreadsheets, graphics or desktop pub- 
lishing progRms. programming lan- 
guages, and more. You'll undoubtedly 
discover that our pros are using some 
of your software favorites, but a few of 
their choices may surprise you. 




DISCOVERY 



Pathways 86 

STEVEN ANZOV IN 
Is a \acation on Mars in your future? 
With advances in modem computer 
technolog)'. you may be taking one 
sooner than you think. 
Rad CAD 88 

MICHAEL PERKINS and 
KELLY RIVERS 

We usually think of CAD as the ultra- 
high-powered software used for design- 
ing everything from spaceships to lux- 
ury' cars. But CAD has started 
appearing in our schools as software 
for kids, and therein lies a stow. 



ENTERTAINMENT 


GamePfay 


102 


ORSON SCOTT CARD 




To really bring a game to life. 


vou need 


lo have the right tools. Here's a look 


inside an expert's toolkit. 




In Ham's Way 


104 



RICHARD SHEFFIELD 
The lime is World War li; the place, 
the icy waters of the North Atlantic. 
Americans and Germans engage in a 
brutal confrontation in the most dead- 
ly environment on earth. How could 
this battle have been turned around? 
Using two naval warfare simulations. 
WolfPack from Brederbund and ,4f- 
tion Staiions from Conflict Analviics, 
and careful historical analysis, COM- 
PUTE's Richard Sheffield finds out. 

REVIEWS 

In-Depth Evaluations 113 

The Manager's Organizer, Micrografx 
Designer, Wealth Starter. DR DOS ' 
5.0, Career Design, Takin'Careof 
Business, BlueMAX, Legacy, Eciin 
Connect, Crosstalk Cojnmunicalor, 
Monologue, LabelPro, Battle Chess! I: 
Chinese Chess, The Savage Empire. 
Altered Destiny, Stunt Driver, Treasure 
Trap, James Bond: The STEALTH 
Affair, SimCityGraphia, Stunts, 
Hoyle's Official Book of Games, and 
many more. 
Sneak Peeks 160 

PETER SCISCO and 
CLIFTON KARNES 
Advance looks at two hot soon-to-be- 
released software packages: Simulated 
Sports Boxing, from Brederbund, and 
Publisher's Painibrushfor Windows, 
fromZSoft. 






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The cost of 
afirst-dass letter 
justdropped 



Reports, letters, resumes. . . if it's 
worth printing, we think it's worth printing well. So we designed ±e KX-P1123 to be a more 
affordable version of the 24-pin we make for business. 

We started with 24-pin print qualit\^. Added 7 fonts. And included emulations for 
both the BiM ProPrinterX-24E and Epson LQ-850.* 

Just like our business printers, we gave the 1123 bottom, top 
and rear paper paths so vou can put it virtually an)^ere. We put 
all the controls right up font on our EZ-Set™ operator panel to make 
set-up tDtally painless. And we incorporated a new automatic 
microline feea diat makes paper loading a cinch. 

We gave it a maximum speed or 240 characters per second 
in draft. Ana finally, we've backed the KX-P1123 with a 2 -year 
limited warrant}^ (cletails at your dealer). 

So stop communicating second-class. And start communi- 
cating with )puT Panasonic dealer. He'll show to why our strongest - 
impression is value. For further information on the KX-P1123 
call 1-800-742-8086. 

Copiers, "typewriters and facsimiles 







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24-pmtsiiteris 




1123 V 
here 






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trademirks of InierniiionaJ 
Business Machines Oifp Epson is 
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Epson Corp 

P4-C0M 



Printers, Computers, Peripherals, 

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■■■"■-■ii» 











EDITORIAL LICENSE 



PETER SCISCO 



This issue oi COMPUTE brings 
with it some exciting changes. 
Over the last several months, the 
editors have worked diligently to 
refine the focus of the magazine and 
to define COMPUTE as a total re- 
source for computing at home. From 
what many of you have said, in letters 
and in phone calls, we're on the right 
track. 

Your feedback is doubly encour- 
aging because it endorses a vision 
shared by the COMPUTE editors. 
From its inception more than ten 
years ago, COMPUTE has attracted 
an active audience that was willing to 
experiment with personal computer 
technology even when it required long 
hours of work to reap the rewards. A 
lot has changed since then. The soft- 
ware applications and the hardware 
platforms we use now are so complex 
and sophisticated that (and this is the 
central paradox of personal comput- 
ing) they make computers easier to 
use for all of us. 

Access to power. That's what 
computing at home is all about. The 
power to make the right decision 



when you go to buy that new laptop. 
The power to make the most of your 
favorite software program. The power 
to influence the decisions your com- 
pany makes— whether youVe the 
president or the rookie. The power to 
help your children realize their poten- 
tial. The power of electronic enter- 
tainment, a world of wonder only 
imagined a decade ago. 

Access to power. That's what 
COMPUTE is all about, too. And this 
month, we want to share that access 
with you. Our new Test Lab section 
gives you the information you need 
when shopping for new equipment, 
spelled out in language that's easy to 
understand, designed for easy access. 

Our expanded Tech Support sec- 
tion (formerly the PC section) solves 
the tough technical questions that can 
hamper your productivity. TJiis 
month, find out how to choose the 
right hard disk for your computer. 
With insight into graphical comput- 
ing, as well as hardware and software 
strategies, Tech Support is sure to be- 
come a valuable resource in your 
home and office. 




Last, but certainly not least, we 
have expanded our Reviews section to 
include as many software and hard- 
ware reviews as possible. Whether it's 
a laser printer or the latest flight simu- 
lator, you'll fmd it in these pages. 

COMPUTE m\\ continue to be 
the essential guide for the PC activist. 
It will continue to provide an avenue 
for the exploration and implementa- 
tion of computer technology at home. 
Our readers will continue to be the 
forward-looking advocates they have 
always been, exponents of the com- 
puting lifestyle. .And as more and 
more people adopt computer tech- 
nology, COMPUTE and its readers 
will be there to share and encourage 
their excitement and discoveries. 

This month, C0A/P/7r£- 
launches itself on a journey of discov- 
ery across the Atlantic, where we ex- 
plore the world of personal computing 
as it exists in Europe — and beyond. 
It's rank fallacy, of course, to talk of 
Europe as one big nation of computer 
users. The platforms that are hottest 
in the United Kingdom may be es- 
chewed in Germany or France. The 
software admired in France may be 
coolly dismissed across the Channel 
Business software must adhere to dif- 
fering governmental regulations. Cul- 
tural attitudes toward violence, 
arcade halls, and narrative many 
times flavor discussions of entertain- 
ment software. 

The burgeoning number of PCs 
moving into European homes is slow- 
ly growing to critical mass. And as 
the community grows, so does the 
opportunity for shared ideas and 
perspectives. 

The idea of home computer users 
linked globally through networks and 
software applications is but a glimmer 
of a random thought, and a long way 
from replacing television broadcasts 
and telephone calls. 

But the idea persists. And it's 
worth considering how a different cul- 
ture might influence the design and 
use of home computers, suggesting a 
perspective we may never gain from 
our own explorations. Q 



6 COMPUTE MAY 1991 



Th^^ nothii^ newabout having ewryteig 
^^^ ^ you need inoneplace. ^ '^' ' 

1^ ^^^m 




WidiCompuSefve, it's allatyour fingertips. 



When you become a member of 
CompuServe, you join a vital, 
active community of over 750,000 
friends and neigiibors from all over 
the world, 

Small-town friendly We 
keep in touch with electronic mail 
and faxes, and by posting messages 
on our bulletin boards. We even meet 
in forums to discuss ever}'thing 
from science fiction to sharing 
software, and to get invaluable 
personal computer software 
and hardware support. And that's 
one of the best things about small 
towns: people helping people. 

Big-city opportunities. But 
we can also shop coast-to-coast 
at hundreds of nationally known 
stores, and take advantage of a 
world-class library We have 



access to the latest 
national and interna- 
tional news. And our 
special financial files 
offer complete statistics 
on over 10.000 




AMEX, and OTC securities. 

We can even trade online with 
our local discount brokers, 

And, just for fun . . , We've 
also got games - everything from 
trivia to TV-style game shows with 



live entertainment to interactive 
space and fantasy adventures, 

We've got airline schedules, 
so you can check out the bargains 
and book your own flights online. 
We even have listings from over 
35,000 hotels, 

It's not hard to get here. To 
get to CompuServe, all you need 
is a computer and a modem. W 11 
send you everything else, includ- 
ing a S25.00 Usage Credit. In most 
places you'll be able to go online 
with a local phone call. 

To buy a CompuServe Mem- 
bership Kit, see your nearest 
computer dealer. To receix'e our 
informative brochure or to order 
direct, call today 

CompuServe 

800848-8199 

Cirele Reacter Service Number 103 




NEWS & NOTES 



At the 
Movies 

IBM continues to build its multimedia 
arsenal by enhancing existing grapii- 
ics-presentation software. IBM's Au- 
dio Visual Connection (AVC) now 
provides touchscreen capabilities that 
ease authoring and viewing multime- 
dia presentations. AVC 1 .03 also in- 
cludes a new video-out option that 
allows users to send draft or finished 
presentations to a videocassette re- 
corder or television monitor. The com- 
pany's M-Control Program, which 
enables full-motion video presenta- 
tions using the M-Motion Video Adap- 
ter/A, now supports Microsoft 
Windows 3.0 and improves the speed 
of performance when run with the 
OS/2 Presentation Manager. 

Storyboard Live!, IBM's anima- 
tion, motion video, and enhanced pre- 
sentation software, now lets users 
create onscreen presentations that In- 
corporate drawing, painting, anima- 
tion, motion video, music, and voice* 
Users can also play back Storyboard 
Live! audio and video without addition- 
al hardware, allowing them to distrib- 
ute presentations on disks for viewing 
by individuals with standard computer 
hardware. New background templates 
and automatic frame-sequencing ca- 
pabilities enable users to quickly and 
easily create presentations. The Video 
Editor, formerly part of an add-on pro- 
gram from Krepec Publishing, has 
now also been fully integrated into 
Storyboard Live!. This allows users to 
capture video sequences for a presen- 
tation with a video-capture board and 
any video source, such as a VCR, la- 
ser disc, or video camera, and then 
play back the sequences from the 
computer's hard drive. Tagged Image 
File Format (TIFF), Picture Exchange 
Files (PCX), Windows Bitmap files 
(BMP), and Graphic Image Files (GIF), 
in addiiton to IBM Linkway, OS/2, and 
Audio Visual Connection files, are also 
now supported. 



The Backfire Heard 'Round 
the World 

Ashton-Tate might not own dBase! In a legal decision that could have major im- 
plications for the entire database market and for the software Industry as a 
whole, a federal judge in Los Angeles ruled that Ashton-Tate' s original copyright 
for dBase Hi Plus was invalid. The ruling came in a look-and-feel suit brought by 
Ashton-Tate against Fox Soflware. in which Ashton-Tate claimed that Fox had 
infringed on Ashton-Tate's dBase Hi Pius copyhght. The judge dismissed Ash- 
ton-Tate's current lawsuit against Fox Software "with prejudice," precluding 
Ashton-Tate from refiling a new suit in the same court. 

Judge Terrence Hatter ruled that dBase Hi Plus is a "derivative work" from 
JPL/DIS, a mainframe database language originally developed at the Jet Propul- 
sion Laboratories in Pasadena, California. The decision is also expected to affect 
dBase tV, which is primarily derived from dBase Hi Pius, This decision is expect- 
ed to strengthen the dBase aftermarket for cfSase-compatible databases and fol- 
low-on products by encouraging independent implementations of the dBase 
language. 

There are currently ten vendors marketing dBase language compilers and 
interpreters. Four of these vendors — Ashton-Tate, WordTech, Fox, and Nan- 
tucket— hold over 90 percent of the dBase-compatible market. Coupled with 
Nantucket's recent moves to eschew the dBase market and reposition its com- 
piler, the decision may cause a significant reshuffling among the dBase market 
leaders. Competitors in the database area that are not specifically dBase- 
compatible include Paradox and R:BASE. Both can import dBase files, however. 



Russian Lotus 



Computer users in the Soviet Union won't have to do without their Lotus 1-2-3. 
Lotus is now shipping a fully translated Russian version of 1-2-3 in the U.S.S.R. 
Esther Dyson, a U.S. expert on the Soviet computer industry, said, "Until now, 
word processing and databases had a higher share of the software applications 
market in the Soviet Union than spreadsheets. As the economy loosens up and 
the need for financial analysis grows, the demand for spreadsheets will increase 
significantly." 

In related news, Lotus has also made several moves regarding its market 
activities in the Soviet Union. Lotus has appointed VNIPI Statlnform as its first 
Soviet distributor. In addition, the Leningrad International Management Institute 
has been named the first Lotus Authorized Training Center in the U.S.S.R. Lotus 
also will open a Soviet sales office in the first quarter of 1 991 . It will be managed 
by Jane Kitson, who was recently appointed business development manager for 
the U.S.S.R. 

"The Soviet market represents both a significant opportunity and a chal- 
lenge for Lotus," said Steve Crummey, senior vice president of Lotus's Interna- 
tional Business Group. "Currently there are an estimated 300,000 PC users in 
the Soviet Union. As the price of PCs in the U.S.S.R. drops and their availability 
increases, the number of users is expected to grow significantly. At the same 
time, the country's economy is in upheaval, and conducting business under 
these conditions is difficult, especially for a foreign company. VNIPI Statlnform's 
existing infrastructure will assist us in making this transition easier.' > 



COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



MicroProse 
Software 

presents: 




Participating 
Retailers include: 

• Babbage's 

• Best Buy 

• CompuCentre 

• Egghead Discount Software 

• Electronics Boutique 

• Lechmere 

• Radio Shack 

• Software City 

• Software, Etc. 

• Softwarehouse 

• Waidensoftware 



Receive a $5 rebate from MicroProse each time you buy any of 
the software titles listed below, from March 15 through June 

15, 1991 , and be automatically entered in the Take $5 Rebate 
Contest "" , Just send us your proof of purchase sticker, your store 
receipt, and the UPC sticker located on the game package. 

The Games: 

• Covert Action • Knights of the Sky • Lightspeed 

• Railroad Tycoon • Silent Service 11 • F-1 9 Stealth Fighter 

• Red Storm Rising • F-1 5 Strike Eagle II • M-1 Tank Platoon 

• Sword of the Samurai • MicroProse Land/Sea/Air Trilogy 

• UMS II • Command HQ • Midwinter 

Stop by your local retailer for complete 
details on the rebate offer and the Take 
$5 Contest! 




PROSE 



ENTERTAINMENT • SOFTWARE 

180 Lakefront Drive • Hunt Valley, MD 21030 • (301) 771-1151 

Can'l fine xe games hsiea anove'' Call l-eOO-879-PUY lo ofcer. Yo^r 55 rebate wi:l be processed tmmeaiaiely and 

you will be sen! a contest entry twm and more details. "No purchase required to enier ine Take S5 Rebase Contest. 

See displays in participating retail stores for more information, cr call McroProse. 

Circle Reader Service Number 197 




NEWS & NOTES 



Senior Hacker 

An 82-year-old retired Navy captain who was aboard the U.S.S. Yorktov/n when 
it was sunk during the Battle of Midway has been named Senior Adult Student of 
the Year. Vane M. Bennett was selected from more than 100 nominations as part 
of Salute to Older Adults Day, when adult schools all over California honored 
their oldest students. Bennett is involved in an avid study of databases, spread- 
sheets, and hard disk management at Grossmont Adult School in La Mesa» 
California. 

Bennett says he's "hooked on computers" and his goal is to become com- 
puter literate so he "can take advantage of all the things computers car do." His 
teachers at the Foothills Center near San Diego describe him as "incredibly ener- 
getic" and "committed to the pure joy of learning." His fellow students, all youn- 
ger, often seek him out for advice and answers to their questions. 

Most adult school classes for older adults are tuition-free. Many have out- 
reach programs that send teachers and aides to senior centers and convales- 
cent homes. 


Faster 
Laptops? 

IBM's next laptops might run faster 
than anything we've seen today. IBM 
researchers have unveiled some new 
transistors that could revolutionize 
personal computers— especially lap- 
tops—by speeding them up dramati- 
cally. The transistors are built out of a 
promising new computer-chip mate- 
rial called "silicon-on-insulator," and 
they reportedly run three times faster 
than their comparable pure-silicon 
counterparts. 

The new transistors are the Com- 
plementary Metal Oxide Semiconduc- 
tor (or CMOS) type of electronic 
devices, a mainstay of computer chips 
that power laptop and personal com- 
puters. IBM research staff member Dr. 
Ghavam Shahidi said the new silicon- 
on-insulator material could someday 
speed operation and decrease errors 
in computer circuits. 


Enabling the Disabled 

"Computer technology is providing solutions that help many of the estimated 43 
million Americans with disabilities to lead more independent lives/' said James 
G. Parkel. IBM director of corporate support and community programs. To help 
enable the disabled, IBM is making available $4.5 million in computer systems to 
federally funded disabilities support centers being established nationwide. Under 
the program, dubbed the IBM Disabilities Assistance Network, persona comput- 
ers and software will be loaned at no charge to the agencies and nonprofit orga- 
nizations designated by the states and U.S. territories to operate the centers. 

"This program builds on the partnerships IBM has established with state 
agencies and nonprofit organizations that work with people who have cisabil- 
ities," Parkel said. The computers will be available to centers receiving federal 
grants to help them assess needs, coordinate resources, and answer telephone 
inquiries. The equipment also will be used to provide demonstrations of 
computer-technology solutions that assist people with disabilities. 

Through the program, centers will be eligible for IBM Personal System/2 
models, peripherals, software, and databases that assist people with disabilities. 
IBM products designed to assist people with hearing, vision, speech, and other 
disabilities will also be available to the centers. The loan program will be man- 
aged by the company's National Support Center for Persons with Disabilities, lo- 
cated in Atlanta. 


Inoculate Your 
Computer Now! 

VirusCure might be just what the doc- 
tor ordered for your PC. According to 
its maker, the program can actually 
cure your computer of a broad spec- i 
trum of known virus infections. 

From International Microcom- 
puter Software (1938 Fourth Street. 
San Rafael, California 94901), Virus- 
Cure scans disks and memory and 
identifies all files infected with known 
viruses. It then removes the viruses 
from all infected files and repairs in- 
fected programs where possible. Vir- 
usCure also identifies any boot-sector 
or partition-table virus that may be pre- 
sent. If a virus is discovered, Virus- 
Cure will open a window in the center 
of the screen, listing the name of the 
infected program and the name of the 
virus. The company claims that most 
COM files and up to 80 percent of EXE 
files can be successfully repaired by 
VirusCure, VirusCure also works on a 
network. 

The new version, developed in 
association with McAfee Associates, 
can detect more viruses (over 230). It 
retails for $89.95, > 


Demanding Lower Wages 

Computer consultants are celebrating a new labor bill which exempts hourly 
computer employees from receiving time-and-a-half for overtime as a rrajor vic- 
tory. Normally, people aren't too happy about lower wages, but National Associ- 
ation of Computer Consultant Businesses (NACCB) president Bill Campbell says 
most computer professionals will actually make more money as a result of the 
new law, 

"Typically, employers have been reluctant to pay the steep overtime costs, 
averaging $75 per hour," Campbell said. "Many of them would simply stipulate 
that employees could not exceed 40 hours each week on a project, even if it re- 
quired more time." 

Now, the association reasons, computer employees will at least be given the 
opportunity to work additional hours for their regular hourly pay. The landmark 
change occurred after more than four years of lobbying efforts by the NACCB. 
For more information, contact Lynee Leaf, NACCB Publicity Chair, Northern Cali- 
fornia Chapter, (415) 835-1 004. 



10 



COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



\ persona^ ss acc^ ^^^^^. \ , 



^p 






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Money management software: It's like having your 
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MoneyCounts installs on your system in just minutesi 

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It's almost impossible to make a mistake when you 
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MoneyCounts comes with a clear, 
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With MoneyCounts you're 

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of your financial picture {cash, 
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You Ml have a pleasant 
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MoneyCounts organizes your 
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even estimates your income tax 
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With MoneyCounts, you're not just buying software, 
you're buying time. Its smart data entry cuts input time by 
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NEWS & NOTES 



Software That Throws a Fit 

Mannequin is a program for computer-aided design (CAD) and graphics-design 
users who need to fit their designs to the human form. The program actually im- 
plements the human fit into the design process by creating moving, fully dimen- 
sional human likenesses on the screen. These lil<enesses can see. wall<:, bend, 
and grasp objects in a quantifiable, ergonomic manner. Ken Goodman, vice 
president and general manager of Mannequin publisher Humancad, sair' *he pro- 
gram "can dramatically improve the appeal of thousands of products b owing 
designers to meet individual customers' needs by matching product de s to 
different human body types." 

The program uses extensive ergonomic data to allow users to combine spe- 
cific likenesses of men, women, and children of different sizes, shapes, and na- 
tionalities into a design. It can be integrated with most popular CAD and graphics 
software packages, such as AutoCAD, Generic CADD, Corei Draw, Micrografx 
Designer, Harvard Graphics, and Aidus Pagemai<er, to provide the user with a 
variety of design options. According to Goodman, the program can assist com- 
panies in improving overall customer satisfaction by providing more comfortable, 
higher-quality, better-designed products and environments, from entire buildings 
to automobiles, home and office furniture, hand tools, and kitchen appliances. 

Mannequin draws human figures from ten world populations, including 
North and South America, Europe, and the Far East The package also draws 
five different body sizes, from extra small to extra large. Specific body parts, 
such as arms, legs, or heads, can be drawn to different scales as well. In addition 
to drawing human physiological characteristics. Mannequin offers animation ca- 
pabilities, allowing the program to evaluate range of motion, vision (including pe- 
ripheral vision), and distance judgment. The program retails for $699, and all 
customers who register the program immediately also receive a free copy of Hu- 
mancad's extensive ergonomic database, including 44 world populations of 
male, female, children, disabled, and military figures. For more information con- 
tact Humancad, 1800 Walt Whitman Road, Melville, New York 11747. 


Finally! An 
IBM Laptop! 

Yes, it's true. According to recent re- 
ports, IBM's long-awaited laptop com- 
puter is finally about ready to ship. At 
this writing, IBM executives have re- 
ported the new PC will be more fully 
loaded than any of the other so-called 
notebook class of laptops currently on 
the market. Reports indicate the ma- 
chine will have a 386SX microproces- 
sor, a 60MB hard drive, and a slanted 
full-size keyboard. Reports indicate 
the new IBM notebook computer will 
weigh 7 to 7V2 pounds and will come 
equipped with 2MB of RAM (expand- 
able to 18MB). The suggested retail 
price is expected to be $5,000-85,500. 


RISC-y 
Business 

Portability and RISC-based computing 

don't usually go hand in hand. Now 
TriGem may have solved the problem 
with the introduction of a battery- 
powered RISC-based laptop PC. The 
company claims it's an industry first 

The new laptop workstation 
weighs only 8.5 pounds and comes 
equipped with 8MB of RAM, a 100MB 
hard disk, and a 13-inch monochrome 
screen capable of 1152 X 900 pixels 
of resolution. The 4-pound battery pro- 
vides 2-6 hours of continuous usage. 
The new laptop's SR^RC architecture 
(or SFARCitecture, as it's called at j 
COMPUTE) was developed by Sun 
Microsystems. It can execute about 
1 5.8 million instructions per second 
(MIPS), compared to about 5-6 MIPS 
for computers based on Intel's 386 
chip running at the same speed. The 
laptop can also emulate CISC proces- 
sors and run DOS software at the 
same speed as a 286 PC, and it's also 
capable, according to the company, of 
running Macintosh software faster 
than a Macintosh SE. The price is ex- 
pected to run between $7,000 and 
$12,000. More information about this 
machine can be obtained by writing to 
Neale-May & Partners, 4920 El Ca- 
mino, Los Altos. California 94022. > 


NCR and AT & T: 
No Peace in Our Time 

NCR chairman of the board and chief executive officer 0. E. Exiey Jr. has placed 
himself and his company in a defensive position against a takeover attempt by 
AT & T In a public letter addressed to AT & T chairman of the board Robert E. 
Allen, Exiey said: "NCR's Board of Directors has been and remains unswervingly 
committed to protecting the vital interests of NCR's shareholders, customers, 
employees, and other important stakeholders. We believe that all of our share- 
holders and other stockholders are best served by continuing to build NCR's 
enormous inherent value as an independent company." 

The NCR board has rejected a $90 stock-for-stock merger offer from 
AT & T, and, in his letter. Exiey called the offer "grossly inadequate and unfair." 
NCR went on to let AT & T know it would consider an offer of "not less than 
$125 per share." Such an offer has not been forthcoming, so NCR broke off ne- 
gotiations, and a bit of name-calling and breast-beating by both parties ensued. 
In his letter, Exiey referred to AT & T's offer as "a desperate attempt to salvage 
AT & Ts disastrous foray into the computer business." Should AT & T continue 
alleged hostile attempts to take over NCR, NCR "will use every means at [its] 
disposal to protect [its] shareholders and other stakeholders." 

NCR then filed a lawsuit against AT & T, alleging that its tender offer filings 
were "false, manipulative, and misleading" and in violation of the Securities Ex- 
change Act of 1 934 and the rules and regulations of the Securities & Exchange 
Commission. 

So AT & T has attempted to take over NCR with what NCR refers to as an 
unfair offer. Now NCR stands ready to go to legal war to protect its interests. 



12 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




Lord British presents the ncjct chapter in the best-seillng Worlds of Adventure series. 
Join Sigmund Freud, Thomas Edison, Teddy Roosevelt and a host of other historical 
cliaracters for a fact- and fantasy-filled odyssey to tum-of-the-century Mars. Hurled 
back in time to the steam powered 1890's, you will take part in an adventure through 
time and space unlike anything you have experienced before. Martian Dreams is the 
game that asks, "What if ?...'' 



• Whai if^n ancient race of beings had 
actually built canals on Mars? 

• V^^ai (/'Jules Verne liad been right, and 
a space cannon powerful enough to send 
men into space had actually been built? 

Featuring tlic acclaimed ORIGIN Graphics 
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winnitig Ultima gaming system* 
Hard disk required. 



What if historical figures like Pcrcivai 
Lowell, H.G. Wells, Nikola Tesla, William 
Randolph Hearst, Rasputin, and others 
had been stranded on Mars as a result of 
a freak accident? 

What if you had to rescue these stranded 
notables to restore their fiuure and your 
own past? This is the epic challenge of 
Martian Dreams, the latest Avatar 
Adventure"^ from ORIGIN. 

AvaUable in retail stores 
worldwide or call: 

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Lltliiu and Lord Brtllsh ur registered tradcmarJu Qf RJchard Garrjott and ORIGIN Systems, Inc. 

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Circle Reader Service Mumber 180 




NEWS & NOTES 



To Catch 
a Thief 

It's getting harder to catch a thief 
these days. According to a report by 
the National Academy of Sciences' 
National Research Council, "The mod- 
ern thief can steal more with a com- 
puter than with a gun." The statement 
may set the tone for how computers 
and the precious data they contain are 
viewed in the 1990s. 

In its report, the council also en- 
courages Congress to form an Infor- 
mation Security Foundation to serve 
as p center for computer-system secu- 
rity research, as many corporations 
are just beginning to understand how 
vulnerable they are to theft or destruc- 
tion of vital corporate information. 


A Three- Way 1-2-3 

Lotus Development's new Network Edition of its popular 7-2-3 release 3.1 is 
specifically designed for Local Area Networks (LANs) running under DOS or Win- 
dows 3.0. The new Network EEditlon, which simplifies the task of installing and 
running the popular spreadsheet on LANs, is available in three editions: Stand- 
ard, Server, and Node. 

The Standard edition is intended for use in a stand-alone or networi<ed envi- 
ronment, including full documentation, software, and a singfe-user license. The 
Server edition is licensed for shared use from a central network file server and 
includes complete network administration software and documentation, product 
software and documentation, and a single-user license. The Node edition pro- 
vides an additional license for network use and contains complete documenta- 
tion and software. 

Each of the new editions provides the ability to share T-2-3 data and pro- 
gram files, as well as network resources, such as printers and fonts. Server and 
Node editions of T-2-3 release 3.1 are available at a retail price of $795 and $495, 
respectively. The Server edition includes 5V4-inch and SVz-inch disk media in the 
same package. 


Hazardous Waste Fine 
for Seagate 

Computers can actually help save our environment by cutting down on waste 
(think of the paper and energy saved every day by electronic mail). But some 
computer manufacturers have actually been found to be contributing to tiie pos- 
sible deterioration of our environment by their manufacturing processes. 

According to a published report, one such company, Seagate Technology, 
was recently fined $850,000 for an environmental violation involving hazardous 
waste. According to the repoit, Seagate allegedly gave more than 500,000 gal- 
lons of copper sulfate solution from its disk-drive plant in Fremont, California, to 
Stapleton Technologies in Long Beach, California, for disposal during a period 
from mid 1987 to late 1988. The fine has been referred to as one of the largest 
environmental penalties in the history of California's Santa Clara County. 


Twice the 
Football 

A special promotion from Data East 
combines the fun of a fast-action com- 
puterized football simulation with the 
pleasure of real-life football in a single 
bundle. Data East's new football bun- 
dle combines its ^SC Monday Night 
Football software with ABC Sports' 
20th anniversary videotape, Monday 
Night Madness, 

ABC Monday Night Football deliv- 
ers the same action-packed excite- 
ment as the original version, plus 
much more. The program is an up- 
grade that delivers improved graphics 
and sound, offering players 25&iolor 
VGA graphics and Ad Lib sound board 
support. Additionally, players can take 
advantage of the game's improved 
use of artificial intelligence. And with 
improved broadcast-style statistics, 
players can keep track of the scoring 
drive, including downs, yardage statis- 
tics, losses, and pass completions for 
more accurate gameplay. 

The Monday Night Madness VHS 
tape highlights some of the most 
memorable moments in NFL history. 
The video is a collection of the heroes 
and villains, including such legends as 
the Juice, the Fridge, and Broadway 
Joe, who have made "ABC Monday 
Night Football" one of the highest-rat- 
ed television shows ever. 


Quest for Merger 

Two of tiie country's biggest <:x3nsumer software companies, Sierra On-Line and 
Broderbund, announced in March their intentions to merge their operations into 
a single company. The proposed merger is a means of broadening their respec- 
tive product lines and gaining clout on retail shelves. 

Under the terms of the agreement. Sierra, which had about 3.6 million 
shares outstanding at the time of the announcement will issue 4.1 million new 
shares of common stock in exchange for all outstanding shares of BroderiDund. 
Sierra-Broderbund will become a wholly owned subsidiary of Sierra. The titans- 
action is subject to approval by both companies' shareholders and other contin- 
gencies. Susan Lee-Merrow, director of marketing at Broderbund, expects tiie 
deal to become final sometime in mid to late April. 

Ken Williams, Sienra's cun-ent CEO, will be chairman, president, and CEO of 
the consolidated company. Doug Cariston, Brodert^und's chairman and CEO, 
will be president of Sierra-Brc)deri3und. Williams said that tiie combination of the 
two firms will have "the financial and technological resources to compete effec- 
tively on a global basis." The only anticipated change, from the consumer's point 
of view, is wider software availability, ej 
— PblLRSCISCO 


"News & Notes" is by Alan R. Bfjchtold. editor of Info-Mat Magazine, an electronic news 

weekly published by BBS Press Service. 



14 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



The best wa^^ 
toteepim 

ontiiewomis 

wilh these 

news letters. 




For news coverage that goes from A to Z, the most important letters in 

the alphabet are NPR, Tune to Morning Edition with Bob Edwards, 

All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition* Together, they make NPR 

the most important news letters in America. For the NPR station near 

you, call National Public Radio at 202-822-2323. 

Morning Edition, All Things Considered 
and \\feekend Edition fiom NPR 

Morning Edition. Alt Things Con Mdered. Weekend Edition and NPR arc registered (radcmarks of National Puhlic Radio. 




DBACK 



LETTERS FROM OUR READERS 



Where Are They Now? 

Does anyone remember Paper mate? It 
was ihe first truly powerful word pro- 
cessor for the Commodore 8032. It 
was written almost entirely in BASIC, 
so it could be revised readily for spe- 
cial uses. It was the ideal first word 
processor, and I have adapted it to the 
PC Fd like to give it away to my 
school, along with the source listing 
(it's compiled with Microsoft Quick- 
BASIC), The question is whether Mi- 
chael Riley, the author of the original 
Papermate, would permit it. Can you 
get me an answer to this question, or 
alternately, can you put me in touch 
with Mn Riley? 

ALFRED D'ATTORE 
DOVER. DE 

If your program "looks and feels'' 
like the original you'll probably 
need to get permission from ihe 
copyright holder before distributing 
it. Check the initial screen of the 
program for a copyright notice. 
Even if Michael Riley is the author, 
the copyright might be in someone 
else*s name. We aren 't aware of the 
whereabouts of Mr Riley, but we 
hope that someone reading this will 
help us track him down. 

Brickbat Roundup 

After I saw the new COMPUTE, my 
feelings about it were affirmed. I must 
say that I really enjoyed the magazine 
as it was because it provided various 
articles for various computers. Now 
the magazine seems to be concentrat- 
ing on the IBM PC, with little or no 
attention given to the Amiga or the 
Apple 11. There are other publications 
designed for the IBM, and there are 
few that provide general information 
about many kinds of computers. I 
wonder what happened to the well- 
rounded magazine. 

CECILIA MCKINLEY 
LOWER LAKE, CA 

Get with the Program 

I like the new COMPUTE. If I re- 
member correctly, COMPUTE used 
to have programs. That was how I be- 



came interested in BASIC and com- 
puters. If possible, could you put a 
small, useful program in once in a 
while to tempt your programmers? 
Keep up the great job I 

RICK WIKOFF 

FPO SAN FRANCISCO, CA 

Check out Tom Campbell's "Pro- 
gramming Power" column. Each 
installment will provide a short, use- 
ful program that illustraies how to 
program the PC with BASIC and 
other languages. 

Dark Victory 

This fall we purchased an AT clone 
for our family. We especially appreci- 
ate the educational programs we Ve 
purchased, but we'd also like to have 
more recreational games. Several 
years ago we owned a Commodore 
VIC-20 and a large collection of 
games for it. However, the VIC-20 fi- 
nally died, and the repair shop lost it, 
leaving us with all these games and no 
computer to play them on. Is it possi- 
ble to have these game cartridges 
transferred to 3V2-inch disks and play 
them on the AT? If so, which compa- 
ny do I contact, and what would be 
the cost? 

WILLIAM H. VICKERS 
IJARBOURVILLE, KY 

There is no way to play VIC-20 
games on an AT Even if you could 
somehow transfer the code on the 
ROM chips in the cartridges to a PC 
disk, the two computers i4se utterly 
different central processing units. 
The VIC's 6502 code would be gib- 
berish to theATs 80286, It seems to 
us that you have two options: Sell or 
donate the games to someone with a 
VIC-20 or advertise to purchase one 
of these units from someone else. 
There must be someone in your 
area with a VIC collecting dust in a 
closet. 

Born to Upgrade 

I have an IBM XT clone with a hard 
drive and a 5'/i-inch drive. I plan to 
add a 3V2-inch drive. I have DOS 3.3, 



the BIOS, and space available to up- 
grade my system. My question is what 
kind of 3 V2- inch drive I should get — 
720K or 1.44MB. I notice that some 
of the new software is using high- 
density disks. My worry is that if I get 
a high-density drive, I won't be able to 
use any of the current popular soft- 
ware on 720K disks. Are they 
compatible? 

Yes, with the exception of some ear- 
ly 720K drives, 720K and 1. 44MB 
disk drives are completely compati- 
ble. You will have to use a slightly 
different format command to for- 
mat 720K disks on a L44MB drive, 
but other than that the capacity of 
the disk should be of no concern to 
you. Not only are they compatible, 
but the price difference between the 
drives is almost negligible — often 
only $10 or $20 by mail order. 

What ought to be of concern to 
you is that some BIOSs are com- 
pletely unable to cope with the 
1. 44 MB drive itself To make sure 
that your BIOS is compatible, read 
your documentation or call your 
computer's manufacturer. 

Border Skirmish 

My new VGA monitor has a black 
border around the color screen. How 
can I eliminate this black border? 

ADAIR D. WILSON 
OCEAN SPRINGS. MS 

All VGA screens have a border 
around them. There are three solu- 
tions to the problem. You cpuld 
write a program that makes a BIOS 
call that results in a thin border of a 
color other than the background 
color. This doesn't eliminate most 
of the border, though. 

You could change the palette so 
that the border is some color other 
than black, but then everywhere 
something black appears on the 
screen, it would be changed to this 
neyv color. 

Finally, you can usually adjust 
the size of the picture using the 
knobs on the back of the monitor. If 



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special sales, with scores of titles to choose from. • Automatic Order. If you want 
the Main Selection, do nothing and it will be sent to you automatically. If you prefer 
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FEEDBACK 



you can adjust the vertical and hori- 
zontal spread on the screen so the 
image is large enough, you can 
make the border essentially 
disappear 

Where It's AT 

I have decided to buy a computer 
with an 80286 microprocessor, but the 
market is flooded with them. Is there 
any difference between a generic com- 
puter and a brand name? Are you just 
paying extra for the name? Also, I see 
that there are different types of BIOSs 
around. What is a BIOS, and which is 
the best one? Phoenix and AMI seem 
to be the most popular. 

ADAM JULIUS 
BELLMORE, NY 

You sound as if you have made up 
your mind, and we hate to throw in 
another source of confusion, but you 
ought to consider a S86 or 3S6SX 
machine. These computers have 
come down in price to the point that 
they rival their 286 cousins, and 
they are faster and much more 
capable. 

There isn 't much difference be- 
tween one AT compatible and an- 
other If there were significant 
differences, the word compatible 
would lose all its meaning. A com- 
patible that wasn't compatible 
would never find a place in the mar- 
ket and would soon die of neglect. 
The price differences you see among 
computers are based in part upon 
the value of a brand name, but the 
value goes beyond a recognizable 
nameplate. A brand-name manu- 
facturer (like Compaq, Dell, Tandy 
or AST) is unlikely to disappear 
overnight, so you will have a service 
department to back you up. The 
woods are full of fly-by-night PC 
companies offering incredible deals 
but little assurance of stability or 
longevity 

A BIOS (Basic Input/Output 
System) chip is the ROM at the very^ 
heart of a computer It provides the 
primitive routines that allow a com- 
puter to operate. Both AMI and 



Phoenix have been around for a 
long time and offer good quality 
BIOS chips. You're right to be con- 
cerned about the BIOS, Early PC 
clones offered BIOS chips with a low 
level of compatibility resulting in 
computers that wouldn't run some 
PC software. This is a problem of 
the past, however. 

Watch out for mail-order PCs 
that seem to offer an unbelievably 
low price. These computers may be 
shipped without RAM, video card, 
disk drives, keyboard, or ports. You 
would be left with a motherboard in 
a steel case and a long shopping list 
of extras to buy Another concern is 
computers that have no expansion 
slots. They aren't expandable or 
user-configurable, so you lose out on 
many of the things that make a PC 
valuable to a user 

Once you have decided on the 
equipment that you need (say, a 
VGA card, a multisync monitor, a 
1 20MB hard drive, a L2MB 5¥4- 
inch and a 1, 44MB SVi-inch floppy 
drive), you need to decide what 
brand you should specify, and in the 
case of the hard drive, you need to 
decide on a formal All of this can be 
incredibly perplexing. 

Although it may end up costing 
more, a beginner is usually best off 
buying a brand- name computer 
from a hometown dealer. Dealers 
will offer advice over the telephone, 
stand behind repairs and enhance- 
ments, and go the extra mile to be 
sure you are satisfied with your 
machine. 



Readers whose letters appear in feed- 
back" will receive a free COMPUTE'S 
PC clock radio while supplies last. Do 
you have a question about hardware or 
software? Or have you discovered some- 
thing that could help other PC i4sers? If 
so, we want to hear from you. Write to 
COMPUTE'S Feedback, 324 West 
Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, Greens- 
boro, North Carolina 27408, We re- 
gret that we cannot provide personal 
replies to tech n ical questions, a 



18 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



connpuTE 

EDITORIAL 
Editor m Chief Peter Scisco 
Art Director Robin C. Case 
Executive Editor Clifton Karnes 
Senior Editor Emeritus Keith Ferrell 

Managing Editof David Hensiey Jr. 
Feature* Editor Robert Bixby 
Associate Editor David English 

Editor, Gazette Tofn Netsel 
Aasociate Editor, 
Amiga Resource Denny Atkin 
Reviews Editor Mike Hudnalf 
Assistant Editor David Sears 
Copy Editors Karen Hu^an 
Karen S^pak 
Susan Thonipson 
Editorial Assistant Kandr Sykes 
ART 
Assistant Art Director Kenneth A. Hardy 
Designer Jo Boy kin 
Typesetter Terry Casrt 

PRODUCTION 
Production Manager De Potter 

Traffic Manager Bartiara A. Williams 
PROQRAMMINQ 

Programming Manager Richard C. Lei nether 
Programmers Bnxe Bowdan 
Joyce Sides 
Troy Tud(er 

ADMINISTRATION 

President Kathy Keeton 
Executive Vice President, 

Operations William Tynan 

Office Manager Syttil A^ee 
Sr. Administrative Assistant^ 

Customer Service Julia Fleming 
Administrative Assistant Effreda Chavis 
Reception ist Cynthia Giles 

ADVERTISING 
Vice President, 
Associate Publisher Bernard J. Theobald Jr 
(212)496-6100 
Vice President, 
Sales Development James B. Martise 
Marketing Manager Carofine Hanton 
(919) 275-9809 

ADVEFITISING ^LES OFFICES 
E«it C<Mftt FuII-Pm* and Standard Diipliy Ada— e*rnard J 
T?ieobaW jr , Chns Coeiho COMPUTE PuWcatoo* (nttKnatonaJ Hd 
1965 Broadway, N'ew Vbrk, NV 10Q23; (212) 496-6100 Niw Er>flil*nd— 
Jack Ganand, Garland Associates, Inc. 10 indusiriaJ Park Re hfinoham 
MA 02(M3; (617) 749-5852, East Coait and MWwwat Fractional ar>d ' 
Product Mart Ads— Caroijne Hanion. Product Man Wanager; COM- 
PUTE PuWicattons tnternaborial Ltd., 324 W Wtendov^r A/e , Sutse 200 
Greenstxsro, NC 27408: (919) 275^9809 South«a»l>fn Accta. Mor.: 
Fud-Pao^. Stand«rd Oiaplay. and M«ij-Ord« Ada— Ha/rtei Rogers 
1725 K St Wi. Sufte 903, Washtngton. DC 200C6 (202) 72B-C^ 
Rortdi— J M Remer Assocrates. 3300 fJE 192nd Si , Sorte 192, 
A^eriijra, FL 33180. (305) 933-146?. (305} 933^8302 (FAX) MiihMat 
Ful(-P»Q« »nd Star>dard Oiiplay Ada— Starr Larw. KationaJ Accounts 
Manager. 1025 Cr&scsnt Blvd. Glen ElJyn, IL 50137: (708) 790^)171 
Mid' Soul hw«»t— Joy Burie&on. Brenda Cocftran, Tanwa Cramer Caro 
OfT: CaroJ Orr & Co , 3500 Ma(^. Surte 500, Dallas. TX 75219: (214) 
521-6116. Wett Coast: EducalJon/ Entertain moot— Jerry Thooipson 
Juies E Thompson Co., 1290 Howard jVe,, Suite 303 Buil.ngame CA 
94010 (415) 348-8222 W* a tern Acct*. Mgr.: Productivity /Home Of- 
fice— Ian Lingwood, 6728 Eton A^/e . Canoga Par^. QA 91303. (818) 
992-4777, W«i| Coaat: Frattionil Mail-Order, Shefewar«, and Prod- 
uct ruart Adi— Lualie Dennis, Jutes E. Thompson Co,. 1290 Howard 
Awe , Sufie 303. Burimganw. CA 9401O; (707) 451-8209, U.K A Eu- 
rope— Beverly Wardate, 14 Usgar Terr,. London W14. England; 011- 
441-602-3298 Japan — Intergroup Communicattoris Ud JifO Semtia 
PresKJeni: 3F Tiger BWg 5-22 SltiOa-toen. 3-ChOfne, Mjnato-ku. Tokyo 
105, Japan; 03-434-2607. Cl«»ified Ada- Sharon StSink»mper. COM* 
PUTE Publications International Ltd . 1965 Broadway, New Vortt NY 
10023; (212) 724-0911 

THE COHPOFUnON 

BoCi Guocione (chairman) 

Kathy K&eton (vfce<hmfmtn) 

DavxJ J Myerscfl ichmf operiiSing o(tic:«r} 

Anthony J Gucoone (secretary treasurtf} 

Wii*m F Mafiiet) (pf^^io&nt, mAfksiing & adwvsinQ ukt$l 

Jotin Evans fpfess^ent. foretgn editions f 

PatTK* J Gavin fv.ce president, chief tinanctal officer} 

ADVERTISING AND MARKETINO 

Sf VP/Corp. Dir.. Wew Business Development: Beverly Wardale- 

VP/D<f . Group Advertising Sales: Nancy Keslenbaum: Sf. VP/Souttiern 

and Midwest Advertising Oir.: Peter Goldsfnrth. Offices New Vork 1965 

Broadway. New York, NY 10023-5965. Tel, (212) 496-6100, Telex 237128, 

Midwest 333 N. Michigan Ar©., Suite 1810, Chicago. IL 60601. Tel, (312) 

3469393 South 1725 K Si, NW. Surte 903. Wash.ivgton. DC 20006 Tol 

(202) 728-0320 Wesf Coast 6728 Etoo Ave . Canoga Park CA 91303 

Tel (BIS) 992-4777, UK and Europe: 14 Usgar Ten^flcs, LorxJon W14 

England, Tel, 01-828-3336. Japan: Intergroup Jiro Semba. Teleii 

J2S469IGLT>D, Fax 4345970, Korea: Kaya Advtsng. IrK,, Rm 402 

Kunshtfi Annex B/D 2S1-1. Dohwa Doog. Mapo-Ku, Seoul. Korea (121) 

Tel 719-6906, Teiex K3£l44Kayaad, 

ADM1M1STRAT10N 
VP/Finance, CFO: Patrick J Gavin, Sr. VP /Administrative So/-Vfces ion 
Winston: Sr. VP/Art A GraptJics: FranJt Devino; VP/f^ewsstand CifCt/te 
tiofi Marcia Ooviti: VP/Director of New Magazine Oeve^opmenr Rooa 
Cherry VP Directof Safes Promotions: Beverty Greiper: VP Production 
Hal Halpf^: Or N«ivsstand Circulation: Pad Rojnich: Or New5*f«nd 
Circulation Distritiution ChartesAndorson. Jf,:ar Subscription Circula- 
tion Maraa Schulti. Director ot Research: Robert Ratrier AdYettisina 
Production Director Charieno Smith: Advertising Production Traffic 
Mgr MarH Wrfltams; Traffic [kr.: Wftam Harbutt: Prodt-cf^on Mgr. Tom 
StinsoR: Asst Production Mgr., Nancy fljce; Foreign Sditiont Mgr Mi- 
chael Stevens; Exec Aut. to Bob Gucdone: Dtan« Connefl: Exec. 
Ass t to David J Myersor: Ten Ptsari; SpecttlAsst. to Bot> Quccton§- 
Jane Hofnl<*h. 



m 



af'i 



Terra 





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Circle nlader Service Number 153 





JKFMY 



SmrE OF COMPUTING 




Americans tend to think of Europe as one place, and a lot of Europeans are 
trying to make that idea a reality. But it isn't. Where Britain and the U.S. 
are said to be divided by a common language, Europeans are divided by 
more than a dozen. Imagine if all of Apple's software and manuals were writ- 
ten in French, while all of Compaq's were in German and Tandy's were in Portu- 
guese. Suppose Microsoft wrote everything in Dutch, while Lotus only dealt in 
Italian. Western Europe is like that, only worse. It isn't going to get easier as Hun- 
garian, Polish, and other languages come into the fold. 

And it isn't just language. The Sinclair ZX-81 and Spectrum micros— sold in 
the U.S. by Timex— were a huge success in France. The reason was simple: Sinclair 
made the effort to produce a special version with an AZERTY keyboard and the 
Secam television standard, which are different from the U.IC's QWERTY and 
PAL. Some countries, such as Belgium and Switzeriand, have more than one lan- 
guage and more than one standard keyboard. 

Compatibility on the Menu 

If you write a program with pull-down menus, it's a mistake to leave just enough 
room for the English words: Swap them for German equivalents, and they all spill 
over the edge. Text isn't the only problem. Just tr>' fitting Italian lire into the col- 
umns allowed by a business program written for Deutsche marks. 

There's only one computer language that unites Europe. The key words in- 
clude zap!, powf, and— for those with long m^mou^s—kaboom! Everyone can rec- 
ognize a fire button. American TV series and Hollywood movies may be painfully 
dubbed into a dozen European languages, but there aren't too many words in the 
average computer game. Anyone can learn the cockpit layout for F'19 Stealth 
Fighter, and RoboCop doesn't need translating at all. Only Germany is a problem: 
Swastikas are verboten, and because violence is considered obscene, sales of war 
games may be limited to sex shops. 

It wasn't supposed to be like this. Most European countries had great hopes 
for their native computer industries. Most supported national champions — Bull 
and Thomson in France, Siemens and Nixdorf in Germany, ICL in the U.K., Oli- 
vetti in Italy, Norsk Data in Norway, Philips in the Netheriands, and so on. But 
they found it hard to compete with transnational s like IBM and Digital Equip- 
ment. Now they're under new pressure from the Japanese. c> 



JACK 



SCHOFIELD 



MAY 1991 COMPUTE 21 




No Hits and Two Outs 

The microcomputer ofTered a second 
chance, but this time Europe did even 
worse. Acorn, ACT, Dai, Dragon, 
Oric, Matra, Thomson, and many 
more proved unable to compete with 
IBM, Apple, Commodore, and Atari. 
Strength in one counir>' was still not 
enough to sustain an international 
market. Only Amstrad, from the 
U.FC, managed to build a large Euro- 
pean business. Its turnover from sales 
of the CPC series of machines, PCW 
word processors, and PC clones is 
about $ 1 billion annually. Amstrad is 
bigger than Commodore or Atari, its 
main rivals. 

Americans are often surprised at 
the European strength of Commodore 
and Atari. Both do the majority of 
their business in Europe. It isn*t hard 
to explain. Europeans generally don't 
have high disposable incomes. Both 
Atari and Commodore offered cheap 
machines, whereas Apple and IBM 
demanded very high prices. For ex- 
ample, an Apple II with two drives 
cost over $5,000, and my first IBM 
PC XT with a printer was over 



$10,000 in 1983. Commodore was 
considered local: It had factories in 
Germany and, briefly, in Corby, a for- 
mer steel town in England. 

Hundreds of small software houses 
had started writing for cheap micros 
such as the Sinclair Spectrum. They re- 
sponded to sales of the Commodore 
64, Atari ST, and later the Commo- 
dore Amiga by supplying the market 
with games for these U.S. machines. 
Software availability drove hardware 
sales and vice versa. Once such a virtu- 
ous circle was established, it M^as hard 
for rivals to break in. Not even the 
500-pound gorilla named Nintendo 
has managed to crack the market 

The Battle of the Byte 

Today, Western Europe has three 
dominant 8-bil home computer for- 
mats and three 16-bil ones. The 8-bit 
formats are the Sinclair Spectrum, 
Amstrad CPC, and Commodore 64. 
The 16-bil formats are the Atari ST, 
Commodore Amiga, and the DOS- 
based PC. There are local varia- 
tions — for example, the Apple 
Macintosh is very popular in France, 



and some places have a smattering of 
MSX. But on the whole the general- 
ization holds true. 

The Sinclair Spectrum is still 
popular in the U.K. and Spain, but it's 
in decline. Amstrad (Alan Michael 
Sugar TRADing) took over the Sin- 
clair computer operation in 1986, im- 
proving the Spectrum's design and 
repackaging the machine in a bigger 
box. This extended its life, but the 
boom days are over. However, the 
Spectrum has become a sort of stand- 
ard in the Soviet Union, where there 
are dozens of unofficial Spectrum 
clones. One of them, the Hobbit, may 
even be exported. 

It was the success of the Amstrad 
CPC — which, like the Spectrum, is a 
280-based home micro — that forced 
Sir Clive Sinclair to sell out. The CPC 
is still doing well in much of Europe, 
especially in France. Indeed, Amstrad 
has just launched an upgraded series 
of CPC Plus models and added a 
games console. All of the cases have 
been changed to make them look just 
like the Atari ST and Amiga. Never- 
theless, CPC sales have also been fall- 
ing as the market moves gradually 
from 8-bit to 16-bit machines. 

The 64 Still in Front 

The exception that proves this rule is 
the Commodore 64. It was a huge hit 
when it came out, yet Commodore 
(U.K.) claims it sold more C64s last 
year than in any previous year. It's 
also very strong in Germany, Austria, 
and Italy, 

Perhaps this isn't such a surprise. 
Every year there are new kids on the 
block lusting after their first home mi- 
cro. And most of the machines that 
used to compete with the C64— the 
Acorn Electron, .Alice, Dai, One, 
Lynx, Enterprise, Video Genie, VIC- 
20, Commodore 16, Plus/4, and a 
dozen or so Japanese MSX ma- 
chines — have faded away. ^ 




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Though much more sophisticated 
than their 8-bit competition, 16-bit 
micros had a tough time becoming es- 
tablished in Europe. Initially they 
were too expensive. In fact, the Atari 
ST, Commodore Amiga, and Apple 
Macintosh were all introduced as seri- 
ous business machines. Several firms 
provided multiuser operating sys- 
tems— BOS, Mirage, OS/9— which let 
you attach a couple of dumb termi- 
nals to an Atari ST and use it like a 
minicomputer. 

In Germany, the Atari ST did 
manage to grab away from the Apple 
Macintosh a slice of the business and 
home/education markets. This is why 
most top ST software — Calamus, Sig- 
num 11, GFA Basic, PrO'24, and so 
forth — is German in origin. But sales 
of STs and Amigas didn't take off in 
the rest of Europe until the prices were 
slashed and the machines retargeted 
at the home/games market. 

Amiga Makes New Friends 

Today, the Atari ST and Commodore 
Amiga dominate the three biggest lei- 
sure markets: Germany, France, and 
the U.K. In Germany, the .Amiga 
seems to be ahead as a games ma- 
chine, while in France the ST has long 
had the edge. In the U.K., the ST be- 
came dominant, but last year the 
Amiga 500 caught up and has now 
overtaken it. Overall, European sales 
are still comparable with those of the 
old 8-bit machines, but the value of 
those sales is much higher. 

In particular, the ST and Amiga 
have received strong support from 



software houses because gam<; prices 
are much higher The bulk of the 
Spectrum market is for low-cost 
games that cost $6 on tape cassette. 
ST and Amiga games usually sell for 
about $40~$50 each. PC game prices 
are even higher, but sales are much 
lower. Naturally, most effort goes into 
high-priced 16-bit games, and 8-bit 
owners have to settle for conversions 
that appear later (or never). 

However, the ST and Amiga 
hegemony is now under attack from 
both ends of the spectrum. Japanese 
games consoles are competing for the 
games market, while the PC compati- 
ble is at last being accepted for home 
use. Instead of buying one machine 
for home office and pleasure, the con- 
sumer is being tempted to buy two: a 
PC and a games console. 

Little Consolation 

In general, Europe has not been a very 
good market for consoles. People have 
bought computers partly for educa- 
tional reasons, and that has meant 
something with a keyboard and built- 
in BASIC. But as parents have 
learned, home micros are used mostly 
for playing games. As this has become 
more acceptable, consoles ha\'e be- 
come acceptable, too. 

Another factor is that Nintendo 
was so involved with supplying the 
U.S. market that it didn't have much 
lime to bother with Europe. This al- 
lowed Sega to become established 
with the Master and, more recently, 
Megadrive consoles. Now Nintendo is 
targeting Europe, and the computer 



manufacturers are fight- 
ing back. Atari, Am- 
strad, and Commodore 
have all produced con- 
sole versions of their 8- 
bit micros (though the 
C64 Game System does 
not seem to be sold out- 
side the U.K.). With the 
arrival of hand-held 
games machines such as 
the Lynx and Nintendo 
Game Boy, Europe may 
be about to go console 
crazy. 

European software 
houses are not bucking 
the trend. In the early 
days, even the best pro- 
grammers wrote only 
for the most popular lo- 
cal machines. Many a 
flower was born to blush 
unseen except on the 
obscure Acorn BBC B. 
Toward the end of 
the 1980s, when cross- 
European software mar- 
keting deals became 
popular, programmers 
started to write for the most popular 
European micros. Nowadays they are 
aware of the worldwide market, in- 
cluding the PC, And what they want 
most of all is a big hit on the Nintendo 
format, because sales in the U.S, and 
Japan have been demonstrated to 
generate huge profits. 

The PC Moves Home in Europe 

In the past, PCs were seen purely as 
business machines, unsuitable for 
home or educational use. Now they 
have a wide distribution through de- 
partment stores and chains, which 
makes them acceptable to consumers. 

The arrival of EGA and especial- 
ly VGA graphics has brought screen 
displays that stand comparison with 
those of STs and .Amigas in the shops. 
Also, there is a ready supply of PC 
games, though the vast majority are 
high-priced U.S. imports. 

The movement was started by 
Amslrad with the launch of its 51 2K 
8086-based PC- 1 5 1 2 in 1 986. At a 
U.K. price of £399 plus tax, it was 
dramatically less expensive than any 
other brand-name PC on the market. 
Corporate buyers sniffed at its CGA 
graphics, lack of flexibility, and unso- 
phisticated appearance — they pre- 
ferred the new Compaq Deskpro 
386^ — but home users snapped it up 
by the hundreds of thousands. 

The PC- 1512, built for Amstrad 
in South Korea, was a success all 
across Europe. In Germany, however, 
it was sold by its distributor, 
Schneider, under its own name. This 
turned out to have unfortunate conse- 




Commodore Amiga, 
Commodore CDTV, 
Atari ST 
PC Compatibles 



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quences. Amstrad started to buy up its 
European distributors, but its rela- 
tionship with Schneider went sour. 
Schneider reacted by designing and 
building its own line of machines. It 
succeeded in capitalizing on its brand 
awareness in Germany and then ex- 
panding into other countries. Annstrad 
has remained the leading European 
brand for home (not business) PC 
buyers, but retaining its position 
has been a struggle. 

The Hole m the Dike 

Once Amstrad had made the break- 
through, of course, others poured into 
the market. Olivetti and Philips— 
both huge multinationals — produced 
lines of smart, low-cost PCs for sale 
through chain stores. Both Commo- 
dore and Atari produced comprehen- 
sive lines of desktop PCs (or brought 
them in from Far East firms such as 
Mitac) for sale through the same out- 
lets. And of course, the Japanese and 
Taiwanese manufacturers competed 
under their own names, too. 

Even IBM made an attempt at 
the home-user PC market, offering 
huge discounts to chain stores willing 
to take huge volumes of its PS/2 Mod- 
el 30. But this was not a success, and 
IBM has since returned to its tradi- 
tional business market. In the U.K., 
for example, the PS/1 is being sold 
without its modem under the slogan 
Five minutes and you're in business. If 
that*s not bizarre enough, it's even be- 
ing pushed at sophisticated corporate 
buyers, such as merchant banks. 

The growth of the PC industry is 
a threat to Commodore and Atari, 
too. Most of the PC-clone vendors 
have only a tiny slice of the market. 
However, there are so many of them, 
surveys show the most popular brand 
in Europe is now Other. Only one 
company pushes the ST, and only one 
pushes the Amiga, but hundreds com- 
pete in the PC market. This is driving 
performance up and prices down. The 
pressure must tell. 

Portents of Change 

Another threat to the ST and .Amiga 
hegemony is the appearance of the 
notebook-sized portable PC. There 
are many people who would like a 
computer at home but who don't 
want a desktop PC dominating their 
living room or study — ^and they don't 
want an ST or Amiga interfering with 
family TV viewing. Notebook PCs are 
a tempting solution. These now have 
good-quality built-in LCD (Liquid 
Crystal Display) screens. And when 
you've finished using one, you can 
just fold it up and put it in a drawer. 

Consumers are happy to buy 
notebook PCs from firms such as To- 
shiba, Sharp, NEC, and Philips. They 



WESTERN EUROPEAN 
PC MARKET ESTIPMTES 

1989 1990 1991 
21,831 26,891 31,678 

END USER REVENUES IN 
MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 

may already own a Toshiba color TV 
set, an NEC or Sharp VCR, and a 
Philips CD player; these are leading 
brands. The consumer electronics gi- 
ants now want to use their marketing 
clout and access to distribution chan- 
nels to dominate this new sector of the 
PC market. 

At the moment, Europ<; is the 
place to be if you're not European. 
Most of the large U.S. firms— IBM, 
DEC, Hewlett-Packard, Compaq, Ap- 
ple — have had European factories for 
a long time. Now the Japan(*se are get- 
ting ready for the arrival of the Single 
European Market at the start of 1993 
by opening plants in European Com- 
munity countries. Many of them al- 
ready manufacture printers, TV sets, 
or VCRs here; PCs will follow. Last 
year, for example, Toshiba started 
building notebook PCs in Germany. 

One European country might 
have been too small a market to both- 
er with. But the pan-European market 
represents a third of the worid's com- 
puter sales and can't be ignored. 



Japanese Invade Europe 

Sadly Europe is not such a good place 
to be if you are European. Many of 
the local suppliers are under strain. 
Last year Philips (the Netherlands), 
Olivetti (Italy), and Groupe Bull 
(France) all announced they were lay- 
ing off thousands of staff. Nixdorf 
(Germany) hit the skids and was tak- 
en over by Siemens, which formed 
Siemens-Nixdorf Informationsys- 
tems. Both Apricot and ICL— the 
largest U.K.-owned PC and main- 
frame suppliers, respectively — were 
taken over by Japanese firms. Many 
of Europe's survivors depend on Japa- 
nese technology, being resellers of Fu- 
jitsu, NEC, or Hitachi mainframes 
and supercomputers. 

All this activity ought to make 
the European market more homoge- 
neous and standardized. No doubt it 
will. But alas, there is no chance of all 
Europeans using the same keyboards, 
the same character sets, the same TV 
standard, or the same currency — let 
alone the same language. The 12- 
member European Community is a 
permanent struggle, and a United 
States of Europe is far from being 
practical 

But it is a noble ideal. And if it 
helps limit rapid-fire infantry attacks, 
tank maneuvers, bombing raids, and 
nuclear explosions to the computer 
screen— and keep them out of real 
life — few of us will ask for more. B 

Jack Schof ield is the computer editor of the 
Guardian, a Loridon-based newspaper. 




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(Books purchased for professional purposes may 
be a tax-deductible expense. Offer good in 
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higher in Canada.) 

Compute 5/91 V-DH4 

©Newbridge Communications, Inc. 




SHAREPAK 



R J C H A R D 



LEINECKER 



Squeeze more power out of your 
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month's SharePak brings you two 
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C/icW F/terVersion1.1 

Developed for Microsoft Windows 
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When the program runs, you see 
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Using the lists makes disk navigation 
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change the file mask so only the files 
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You can tag multiple files for 
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This feature can really come in handy 
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Using this program with Win- 
dows will simplify those clumsy and 



awkward disk operations and make 
Windows a friendlier environment. 

PS/con Version 1.1 

Making your own icons for Windows 
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you create \\ith PaintBrusfh 




Using the program is easy. Just 
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And you can cut a larger image than 
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Customizing Windows lets you 
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sides having fun, you might gain 
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PCBUDGET 

If you're like most people, you'd like 
to be better about budgeting your 
money PCBUDGET, written for MS- 
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Your finances are probably com- 
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If you're serious about your 
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son who wants to get ahead. 

B^sum^ Professional Version 1 .6 

If you've ever looked for a job, you 
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Dialog boxes tell you what infor- 
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it later. 

Pull-down menus, dialog boxes, 
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make you think you're in a new envi- 
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If you think you'll ever write a re- 
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you might well have an edge over 
your competition when you apply for 
that next important position. B 



28 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



SHAREPAK 

With CXDMPUTE's SharePak, You'll 

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SAVE TIME — we carefully select and test all 
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COMPUTE'S SharePak disk contains the best of 
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YESI I want to share in the savings. Send me the May 1991 issue of 
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5 V4'irvch at $5,95 each -^ 3Vi^ndi at $6.95 each 

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Sates Tax (Residents of NC arxl NY. please add appropriate sales tax for 

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^^_^^^ Shipping and Handling (S2,00 U.S. and Canada, S3.00 surface mail. $5.00 air- 
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^ Totat Enclosed 



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Please indicate the disk size desired: 

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For delivery outside the U.S. or Canada, add S10.00 for postage and handling. 



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zine or disk. Please order SharePak separately. 



G IN THE 
ER EUROPE 



ven as the bitter wind cut through 

■ our winter coats and boots, we were 
glowing with excitement at the pros- 

■ pect of spending three weeks in the 
Soviet Union. The cramped seating and 
bumpy flight made all 22 of us— 1 7 high 
school students and five teachers— hap- 
py to disembark from the Aeroflot 
plane that had brought us to Moscow 
from Finland. 

The state of technology in the Sovi- 
et Union forces the people to rely on 
their own resources. Because even elec- 
tronic calculators are unheard of, shop- 
keepers ring up purchases with an 
abacus instead of a cash register. Busi- 
ness people can fax information, but 
there are only 16 international tele- 
phone lines out of the Soviet Union, so 
a message can wail for days to be sent 
out of the country. 

As a computer teacher in the Unit- 
ed States, I was naturally interested in 
how the Soviet citizens were using what 
new technology was available. I knew 
there were computer hackers out there. 
After all, it was a Russian who created 
the challenge of Teiris. 

My mission started in Moscow. I 
had seen ads for computers on Rus- 
sian television, and I carried with 
me some references from Ameri- 
can magazines about computer ^ 



conventions in Russia. I quizzed 
everyone I met who could speak Eng- 
lish, but no one could give me any 
information about computer conven- 
tions. No one could direct me to a 
computer store, a software store, or 
even a magazine store. There just 
weren't any. No one I talked to had 
ever even used a computer. I drew a 
complete blank in Moscow, 

My sleuthing days appeared to be 
numbered. The people I spoke to were 
interested in computers, they believed 
computers could be useful, and their 
kids were up to date on all the titles of 
the latest games. Yet they could not buy 
computers for their homes or their 
schools, 

I was later told that there were 
no computer stores avail- 
able to the public ^ ^ 



K R I S T. 



R N B E R G 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 



in Russia. Only used computers were 
to be found, and these were all sold or 
traded privately, not in stores. There 
was also a very long waiting list for 
them. New computers had to be 
brought in, one at a time, from out- 
side the country, which meant they 
had to pass through the numerous and 
thorough customs officials. 

Moving useful technology 
through customs is almost impossible. 
In the rare event that a computer be- 
comes available for sale, the price is 
outrageous. It can cost a Russian fam- 
ily four times as much as a car, or up 
to about 40,000 rubles. This sum may 
not seem large when you translate it 
into dollars (40,000 rubles is a little 
less than $700), but a Soviet citizen 
might earn less than 100 rubles (about 
$18) per month. 

At that rate you'd have to save 
every single penny for well over three 
years for a computer. And the com- 
puter might be a used computer, not 
even new or up to date. 

The second leg of my trip was Es- 
tonia. I immediately noticed differ- 
ences when I crossed from Russia into 
Estonia. Most obvious was the pres- 
ence of stores— food stores, clothing 
stores, handicrafts stores, and phar- 
macies. It was apparent that the Esto- 
nians enjoyed more comforts and 
choices than the Russians. 

Our group was participating in an 
academic exchange with a high school 
in Tallinn, the capital city. As 
a part of the exchange, the pre- 
vious autumn we had ar- 
ranged for the school to have 
an Apple He computer and 
printer. We also provided it 
with some indispensable 
tool software: word process- 
ing, database, greeting card/ 
sign making, and various logic 
and skill-building programs. I 
was eager to see how the com- 
puter was being used and what 
kinds of problems the Esto- 
nian teachers and students 
had come across. I wasn't 
even sure if they had been able 
to set it up. 

My fears about their hav- 
ing the computer up and run- 
ning were put to rest the minute I 
walked into the school. Some of the 
high school students who specialized 
in computer studies were waiting in 
the lobby to take me to their Apple 
and show me everything they had 
done with it. Many of them were very 
experienced in BASIC and machine 
language programming by this time, 
and they had also taught themselves 
to use all of the software. Some of the 
students had even reprogrammed the 
word processor so that the menus 
were shown in Estonian. They trea- 



sured the computer and kept a careful 
watch over it, locking it behind sever- 
al doors each time they were finished 
using it. The computer was heavily 
used — and not only during ijchool 
hours. 

The American students reported 
that their Estonian friends s:aenl many 
Friday nights and Saturdays using the 
computer in the school They were as- 
tounded that the Estonians would vol- 
untarily spend Saturday at school. But 




Russian Orthodox Church, Taltinn, Estonia 




Time-sharing at School No. 21. Tallinn, Estonia 

to the Estonians it was a privilege to 
be there with the computer. 

in another part of the school, dur- 
ing regular class times, many students 
were busy writing programs to simu- 
late a password-protection scheme. 
The BASIC programming language 
they used was an interesting mixture 
of English and Estonian. I tried to 
help debug one student's program, but 
the only command I could recognize 
was STOP. I was amazed to find a 
third-generation computer still in use: 
This Bulgarian minicomputer dated 



from the 1960s, and its technology 
was passe long before that in America. 
It supported a total of five terminals, 
was hard-wired to run only BASIC, 
and — believe it or not — allowed only 
64KofRAM, 

In addition to their computer 
classes at school, many students trav- 
eled after school every day to a nearby 
university to work on an IBM system. 
There they would wait in long lines 
for a turn to work at one of the 
terminals. 

However serious they were, the 
students managed to find lime to play 
computer games. What did they 
spend their free time playing? Do you 
remember Sea Fox, Star Blazer, Super 
Puckman, Sneakers, or Spy's Demise? 
Although we may think of these 
games as old-fashioned, they were 
new to the Estonians. 

I discovered a second Apple com- 
puter in Estonia. I also found an old 
IBM PC. This machine was in a doc- 
tor's office and was used for research. 
The doctor had taught herself to use 
the computer without any help other 
than a manual (which was printed in 
English). Her greatest need was for 
blank disks on which to store her 
information. 

The majority of computer enthu- 
siasts in the school were boys, but 
some girls were also interested, and 
everybody shares the computer equal- 
ly So far, the students monopolize 

the computer, but the interest 
on the part of teachers is 
growing. 

Times are definitely 
changing in the Soviet Union. 
Some major universities are 
becoming computerized, and 
students are allowed more ac- 
cess to the computers for their 
research. Online information 
services are beginning to 
spring up in major cities. A 
new line of microcomputers is 
scheduled for release through- 
out the U.S.S.R. When and if 
these micros are made avail- 
able to homes, businesses, and 
schools, we'll begin to see a lot 
more activity in the computer 
world. 
After three weeks of travel in 
Russia and Estonia, my strongest im- 
pressions were of the changing politi- 
cal situation throughout the Soviet 
Union, the food shortages, the lack of 
choices available to the population, 
and the incredible warmth and caring 
of the people. Russia is caught be- 
tween an old world and a new one. 
Traditions remain while technology 
languishes. Even where the equip- 
ment is available — as in the case of 
the doctor trying to do research— the 
accessories can't be found, B 



32 COMPUTE MAY 1991 



TEST LAB 




WELCOME 

Each month COMPUTE'S Test Lab 
will focus on a specific kind of hard- 
ware and offer you the informalion 
you need to guide your understanding 
of the technology and to make in- 
formed buying decisions. Our compre- 
hensive system benchmarks are 
accompanied by in-depth explana- 
tions of the tests and the technology. 
Attractive graphics clarify differences 
in features and performance. You also 
get the expert product reviews thai PC 
activists have come to expect from 
COMPUTE. This month, Test Lab 
examines three desktop computers 
and four laptops — seven capable com- 
puters representing a range of technol- 
ogies and prices and suitable for a wide 
range of computer users. 



CONTENTS 

LASER Pal 286 34 

Packard Bell 
PB286NB 36 

Sanyo MBC-17NB 40 

Sun Moon Star 

386SX 43 

Tandy 1000 RL/HD 46 

Veridata LapPower 

286/40 50 

Zeos Notebook 286 52 



# TEST LAB 



LASER nVL 286 



shamefully admit that my first im- 
pression of this small-foolprint sys- 
= tern was less than favorable. I never 
thought a machine this small could 
ever compete with the 386SX I use 
every day at work. 

Surprised that I had the system 
up and running in less than ten min- 
utes, 1 decided to keep an open mind. 
(I recommend that amateurs follow 
the instructions in the Quick Start 
Guide or watch the installation video- 
tape provided before they hook up 
any cables.) 

As 1 found out and as the name 
implies, the Pal is user-friendly. The 
40MB hard drive formatted with 
DOS 4.01 comes installed with 
Geo Works Ensemble and Prodigyi A 
few nonessential but appreciated ex- 
tras include a 2400-baud Hayes-com- 
patible modem, a high-resolution 
VGA monitor with a tilt-swivel stand, 
and a 1 5-pin game port. 

Additional hardware includes 
dual disk drives, 1MB of memor>; a 
parallel port, a Microsoft-compatible 
mouse, and an enhanced keyboard 
with 102 keys — firm but not stiff. 



LASER COMPUTER 
800 N. Church St. 
Lake Zyrich, IL 60047 
(708) 54Q>8086 

CPU Type: 80286; CPU Speed: 12 MHz 
Conventional Memory: 640K; Extended 
Memory; 384K 

Ports: 2 serial, 1 parallel, 1 mouse, 1 game 

Drives: 6y4-inch 1.2MB floppy, 3V2Mnch 

1.44MB tioppy, 42MB hard 

Video Modes: text, CGA, EGA, VGA 

List Price: $1,995.00 

Street Price: $1,416.58* 



COMPUTE 




*Test Lab street prices are an average of prices advertised in 
computer magazines and national newspapers during Febaiary 1991 



MAY 1991 



That adds up to a lot of punch for a 
computer that measures no more than 
14 inches square and 5 inches high. 

You can easily expand the PaPs 
memory to four megabytes if the one 
megabyte of installed RAM isn't 
enough. The hardware reference guide 
discusses the type of RAM you should 
purchase, and it gives complete in- 
structions on where and how to install 
the RAM modules. 

There's no math coprocessor, but 
one can easily be installed in the avail- 
able socket. Installation instructions 
are in the hardware reference. The 
four AA alkaline batteries are easily 
accessible when it's time to replace 
them. Of the four horizontally placed 
card slots, two are open for simple in- 
stallation of any additional cards. 

The system runs at either 8 or 1 2 
MHz, and you can set the speed easily 
with the turbo button. The current 
speed appears in an LCD display lo- 



cated on the front of the system above 
the turbo key. The reset button and 
the keyboard lock key are also easily 
accessible on the front of the system. 

Hardware isn't the only surprise 
included with the Pal. A free month's 
service is offered for Prodigy, a well- 
known online service. The Prodigy 
software, a hardware reference book, 
an MS-DOS manual, and a GeoWorks 
Ensemble manual are also included. 

If the Pal has an Achilles heel, it's 
the cooling system. The cooling vents 
are located on the top rear of the CPU 
box. If you place the monitor on top 
of the unit and cover the cooling 
vents, you risk overheating the sys- 
tem. Since the monitor's base is al- 
most as large as the computer, it 
would be easy for this to go unnoticed. 

It's true that a single computer 
can't be all things to all people, but if 
if you're looking for a reliable and full- 
featured system, the LASER Pal 286 



COMPUTE 
Application indexes 

Since the Test Lab section is de- 
signed to give you the best infor- 
mation about how systems wit! 
perform when you take them home 
or to your office, we performed a 
set of tests involving commonly 
used applications. 

The timings indicate how long 
it took a particular computer to rein- 
dex a database, sort a database, 
perform a search and replace in a 
word processor, and recalculate a 
spreadsheet. 

can fill the bill As a matter of fact, I 
keep hinting to my superiors that Fd 
like to keep the Pal for all the hard 
work I do around here, but I don't 
think they're getting the message, 

JOYCE SIDES 




T E 35 



# TEST LAB 



Fy^KARD BELL 
PB286NB NOTEBOOK 



Compact design, crisp display, 
and performance options make 
Packard Bells PB286NB a solid 
contender in the notebook arena, 
although the list price isn't as compet- 
itive as the marketplace demands. 

The PB286NB is a capable road 
warrior, as I found out while taking it 
on several cross-countr>' jaunts. The 
unit's size and weight made it practi- 
cally unnoticeable during transport. I 
found it quite easy to set up and use 
during plane rides, without breaking 
the tray tables or crowding the passen- 
gers around me. 

The PB286NB stretches its ni-cad 
battery life with a series of power- 
down options that you can define dur- 
ing setup. .Automatic power-saving 
functions help to extend the reach of 
the system whenever youVe running it 
from the battery^ and include a slower 
rate of DRAM refresh, shutdown of 
the floppy drive if it isn't in use, and a 
slowdown of the CPU (from the 
standard selectable 12- or 6-MHz 
clock speed to 0. 1 25 MHz) when pro- 
cessing activity is absent. 

You can disable or add to 
these power-saving functions 
during setup. .At this point, 
you can set the screen back- 
light and LCD screen power 
to shut off when not in use, 
disable ports, and set the 
hard disk to shut down af- 
ter a predetermined period 
of inactivity, 1 found that 
setting the power-saving 
functions to their maxi- 
mum efficiencies did not 
adversely affect my work 
with the svstem. 

IfthePB286NBcan 
be singled out for praise, 
it must be for its sharp LCD 
display The VGA-compatible resolu- 
tion of 640 X 480 maps 16-color ap- 

36 COMPUTE M 



mCKARD BELL 

9425 Canoga Ave. 

CKatsworth.CA 91311 

(818)773-4400 

CPU Type: 80286; CPU Speed; 12 MHz 

Conventional Memory: S40K; Extended Memory: 384K 

Ports: 1 serial, 1 parallel, 1 VGA, 1 keyboard/keypad. 

1 floppy drive, 1 mouse 

Drives: 3V2-inch 1.44MB floppy, 21MB hard 

Video Modes: text, CGA, EGA, VGA 

Screen Type: LCD with CCFT backlight 

List Price: $3,995.00 

Street Price: $2,008.79 





The Only Executive Tools 

More Colorful 

Than The GSX-140. 



j I- 1 in UK 



. I I I The GSX-140 is tlie ultimate executive business tool for 
, 'i^ "' office and home. PC Magazine has awarded it their 
j''iI3iii!5 Editor's Choice for best 24-wire printer. 

Like its wide carriage cousin the new GSX-145, the 
print qualit)' rivals tliat of any printer in its class and its 
six resident fonts give you more flexibilit)^ to design your output. 

And, like all our new printers, it's equipped with our exclusive 
Color On Command^'' feature which gives you 
the capabilit)^ of installing dynamic color to 
make your spread sheets easier to read, your 
graphics easier to understand, and your pre- 
sentations simply brilliant. 

Speaking of ease of use, it doesn't 
take a MIS manager to operate tlie 
GSX-140 printer. That's because tlie 
Command-Vue'" control panel 
prompts you with plain English 
directions on its LCD panel. The 
'"Quick" menu gives you instant 
access to the printer settings most 




fi 



SALES Bf REtaOM 






^ 



^-M- 



'^•^^ 



often changed, it remembers your four favorite 
software programs and sets them up just the way 
you like lliem, ever\' time you use them. 

Blending 192 cps, logic seeking, bidirectional 
printing and high speed paper feed, tlie GSX-l40's 
high throughput design quietly cranks out page 
after page far faster than any of the competition. 
What more could a busy executive ask 
for from a printer? How about peace of 
mind in tlie form of a 24-month parts 
and labor warranty 

Once you've tried the new GSX-140, it'll be 
eas)^ to see how it makes your reports brighter 
ll^L 1 p and life easier For the dealer near you, just 
Sa\ ■■ ^^' 1-800-441-2345, ext. 34 in Calif, 




■ 



1-800-556-1234 exl 34 outside CaUf, 




C1990 Ciyxim Mt^aici CorpoiBtion- 

Qtizen, Qjltw On Command, Oimmand-\\:e and the 

Qlizien ki^o are indemartts c>f ihc Cnizen Watch Q). lid. 

#CITIZEN' 

Cifcle Reader Service Number 140 



plications to 16 shades of gray, A 256- 
color video mode will map to 32 
shades of gray, giving you a clear view 
of even your most advanced graphics 
applications. 

Expandability must also play a 
role in a well-designed mobile system. 
Packard Bell has built into the 
PB286NB the capabilities for attach- 
ing external options like a mouse, a 
keypad, an external keyboard, an ex- 
ternal monitor, and an external floppy 
drive. The traditional parallel and se- 
rial ports and the usual external bus 
connector (for connecting an external 
chassis that can hold two AT-class in- 
terface cards) round out the expansion 
options. 

All of the ports are concealed be- 
hind hinged television-style doors that 
pop open at the press of a finger. Al- 
though I like the look and operation 
of this design, I have reservations 
about its stability. Small hinges and 
quick-release doors don't hold up on 
the road too well Sliding covers made 



of high-quaHty plastics and possessing 
fewer parts tend to hold up much 
better. 

The field of notebook computers 
is full of competitively priced ma- 
chines that will let you take your of- 
fice on the road without sacrificing 



lfthePC286NB 
can be singled out 
for praise, it must 

be for its sharp 
LCD display. 



your ability to perform. The PB286NB 
notebook is no exception. It brings all 
the performance most mobile workers 
will need to a compact system. Its 
comparatively high list price ($3,995) 
will discourage the casual traveler. If 
you're interested in this system, how- 



ever, you should know that the actual 
selling price is closer to $ 1,800. That 
price is much more in line with cur- 
rent market trends and may attract 
mobile computer users who need a 
topnolch display for their applications. 

PETER SCISCO 



Memory Tests 

The memory tests performed by 
CX)MPUTE's BenchMark program 
count the number of memory reads 
the microprocessor can make in a 
second. The resulting indication of 
memory speed, along with com- 
puter speed and processor type, 
determines how well a system per- 
forms in reai life. 

These tests may not yieid re- 
sults directly proportional to the 
speed of a computer or the proces- 
sor type. Other factors such as 
memory speed, bus size, and DRAM 
refresh affect overall performance. 



Memory Reads 



2.500,000 



2.000.000 



1 .500.000 



1 .000,000 



500.000 




'msmm- 






Conventfonal 
Extended 



38 



COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



::^r 



^■in 



Two Year 
Q^SiteWanaiiy 

24HourTediSt53pat 



Ree Secoid-Day Air 
P Delivery 

PERFORMANCE is a 
direction for a company, a 
goal for a system, a passion 
for the people who build our 
computers. It shows in the 
quality of the components we 
use, in our painstaking 72 
hour testing program, in the 
way we protect your invest- 
ment with two year on-site 
and second-day air; all at no 
extra charge to you. 

It shows in the quality of 
our sales and tech staff too, 
people you 11 actually enjoy 
talking with. And help is here 
if you need it - now 24 hours. 



Performance! 



I 




386-SX 20Mhz Only: $795 



386-SX16Mhz:$749 




All Computer Systems Inciude:One Meg RAM, 

Zero Wait State Operation, 1.2or L44 Floppy, 

1:1 IDE Controller, Parallel, 2 Serial, Game Ports, 

101 Keyboard, MGP Video, Clock/Cal, Manuals. 



386-25 Mhz:$995 
286-12 Turbo:$495 

1024X768 VGA, $499 



40 MEG, 28ms HARD DRIVE: $250 




NOVA Computers manufactured by: UompUXBrSx^ t/TSf 



27 West 20th Street New York, N.Y. 10003 

Circle Readtr Service Numb*f 13i 



# TEST LAB 



SANYO MBC-17NB 
PERSONAL COMPUTER 



It's tiny, it*s fast, and it comes with 
Windows and IVorks installed on 
its 20MB hard drive. The backlit 
screen is bright and clear. What's 
not to like about the 80286-based 
Sanyo MBC-1 7NB notebook com- 
puter? (An 80386-based 18NB is slat- 
ed and will probably be released by 
the time you see this.) 

The list of attractive features is 
long, including a keyboard that is re- 
markably comfortable to the fingers 
and an eight-gray-scale screen that 
provides a clear, sharp image as long 
as the "grays" displayed are black and 
white (more about this later). As 
shipped, the 1 7NB is equipped with 
1MB of RAM. An optional modem 
and memory expansion to 5MB are 
available. The computer and its 
power supply/recharger fit com- 
fortably in an average-sized 
briefcase, leaving enough 
room for a couple of maga- 
zines and a legal pad. (Note to in- 
ventors: The industry desperately 
needs a portable computer power 
source that can fit in a shirt pocket,) 
Two important issues for assess- 
ing notebook computers are the quali- 
ty of the screen and the feel of the 
keyboard. Perfect gray-scale represen- 
tation might simply be too much to 
ask of a flat-screen monitor at this 
stage in the development of display 
technology. This screen is touted as an 
eight-gray-scale display, but unless an 
image contrasts dramatically with the 
rest of the screen, it fades into the 
background. 

The keyboard is fast and respon- 
sive, though the awkward lower-left 
placement of the Function key 
(which, for example, turns the up- and 
down-arrow keys into page-up and 
-down keys respectively) makes it an 
easy target for the left hand while typ- 
ing, resulting in some strange typos 
until you become accustomed to it. t> 




SANYO BUSINESS SYSTEMS 
51 Joseph St. 
Moonachie, NJ 07074 
(800) 524-0048 

CPU Type: 80286; CPU Speed: 12.5 MHz 

Conventional Memory: 640K; Extended 

Memory: 384K 

Ports: 1 serial, 1 parallel, 1 video 

Drives: 3V2-inch 1.44MB floppy, 21MB hard 

Video Modes: text, CGA, EGA, VGA 

Screen Type: ST backlit LCD 

List Price: $2,999.00 

Street Price: $1,999.95 



40 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



R P R A T 



SupraMoOem 



■Z I'l 




Feafuring 

MNP5&CC!nV.42bis 

Error Correction & 
Data Compression 
Protocols 



Sl««« 






^J^"^^ 



^^^,o..-.«- 




Up to 9600 bp$, error-free 
^ throiighpiit wnen communicating 
with another V.42bis modem 

^ Up to 4800 bps throughput with MNP 5 

^ Compatible with MNP classes 2-5 

► Supports Bell 1 03/21 2A & 
CeiTT V.21/V.22/V-22bi$/V,42bis 

^ Asynchronous operation at 
^ aOO, 1 200, and 2400 bps 

w Automatic adjustment to optimal 
^ protocol & rate 

^ 1 00% ^AT'' command compatible 

^ Works with virtually any computer 

► Compatible with all ponular 
telecommunications software 

y Autoanswer/ Autodial (tone or pulse) 

^ Two modular phone jacks 

^ Adjustable-volume speaker 

^ Made in the U.S.A. 

^ 5 year warranty 



Tlie SupraMoclem 2400 Plus adds MNP classes 2o and CCnT V.42bis to 
die popular SupraMoclem 2400, providing high-speed, error-free 
communications. MNP 5 lets you coinniunicate witli any MNP 5 modem 
with ihroughput up to 4800 bps — 2 times faster than regukr2400 f)ps 
mcxkms. can V.42bis, the international standard for en-or correction and 
data compression, gives up to 9600 bps error-free throughput — a4 times 
speed improvement over Regular 24()0 hps modetm. All this means you c^m 
get more done with less time spent on line, so all your costs are less! 

With the SupraAIodem 2400 Plus, you can simply set your terminal to 9600 
bps and then forget atout nite and protocols. The SupraMoclem auto- 
matiailly determines what kind of modem is at the other end of die phone 
line — V.42bis, MNP, 2400, 1200, or 300 bps - and then adjusts its rate 
and protocol for optimal communication with the otlier modem. 

Fast en-or-free communication has never teen so affordable. Contact your 
local dealer or Supra Corporation to find out more today! 

Also Available: SupmModem 2400 Plus IBM''' inlenml $199*95, 
StipraModem 2400 MNP external S199S% SupmModem 2400 
MNP IBM intmml SWM 





rj^ 




yr^ 



1 1 33 Commercial Way, Albany, Oregon 97321 USA 
PHONE: 503-967-9075 • FAX: 503-926-9370 



8 



ORDERS 1-8 00-727- 

SupraModem 2400 Plus. SupraModecn 2400i Plus. SupraModem 2400 MNP. and SupraMoclem 2400i MNP are trademarks of Supra Corporalion. IBM is a trademaik crt Intemafional Busiriess Machines Cofp. 



The batteries last a couple of 
hours — enough for most purposes^ — 
and they are compact enough that you 
could carry a couple of charged-up 
spares in an overcoat pocket. At a 
desk, you can use the charger as a 
power supply, which leads me to one 
complaint about this machine that 
would be easy to fix. The power 
supply/battery charger unit has a 
three- foot power cord, but the cable 
from the charger to the computer is 
only about 1 8 inches long, which 
means that the power supply has to sit 
on the same surface as the computer 
when it's in use. Sanyo should have 
provided a long cord to the computer, 
allowing the transformer to sit on the 
floor, out of the way. 

The low-battery light gives you a 
little warning when the battery pack is 
breathing its last, but don't think you 
have enough time to do one more re- 
calculation on your spreadsheet. 



Storage Media Device Tests: 
Contiguous Read, Fragmented Read, 
Contiguous Write, Fragmented Write 

Regardless of the speed and computing power of a computer, the storage de- 
vices are often a bottleneck. COMPUTES BenchMark program performs four 
different tests that can help rate the speed of a drive. 

Our tests read and write sectors to the drive with a timer running. That way 
we know how many sectors have been accessed in a second. The more sec- 
tors read or written, the better the performance and the faster your applications 
will run. 

Not only have we read and written whole blocks of information from the disk 
with our contiguous read and write tests, but we've also developed a test that 
addresses the disk in a fragmented order that's closer to real-life drive per- 
formance conditions. Seek time, interieave factor, and other statistics are con- 
densed into four easy-to-understand numbers. 



You'd be well advised to save your 
work immediately, or you'll have an 
unpleasant surprise. 

You might want to know that 
Sanyo makes the ZEOS and Commo- 



dore notebook computers, which are 
virtually identical to the Sanyo. 
Whichever you choose, you'll be get- 
ting a handy, well-designed computer. 

ROBERT BIXBY 



Contiguous Reads 



^sim 




^^^P^BBmHBb^ - f ^iii^rar 


/ 
9 


'^^^^^KSi.. / .^t 


JBM 


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en hanj drive 
ra 3V^lnch drive 
6y44nch drive 



"\ X X X X '\ 



42 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



# TEST LAB 



SUN MOON STAR 
386SX 



Ease of setup, a small footprint, and 
opportunities for expansion make 
the Sun Moon Star 386SX a sys- 
tem you should consider, especial- 
ly if you're new to computing. 

The Sun Moon Star is quite easy 
to set up. You'll find all the usual 
manuals and setup guides, but you 
also get an extremely helpful VHS 
videotape that walks you through the 
entire installation process. 

The unit I reviewed came with 
1MB of RAM, with room for up to 
8MB on the motherboard. The system 
allows a flexible RAM configuration; 
you can populate with 256K chips, 
1MB chips, or a combination of both. 
You can thus upgrade cost effectively 
and without using up one of your slots. 

This computer has five slots: 
three 16-bil AT slots and two 8-bit XT 








slots. The AT-bus FDD/HDD con- 
troller card can handle up to two hard 
disks and two floppy drives, saving 
you money, because you don't have to 
buy an additional controller card. And 
it frees a slot for later expansion, 

A fast (28ms), formatted 44MB 
hard disk comes with the unit, with 
DOS installed. In just a few minutes, I 
had the computer up and running. 

You get a crisp, clear picture on 
the Sun Moon Star analog RGB mon- 
itor. The 256-color VGA graphics are 
very impressive, offering photograph- 
ic-quality displays. I was disappointed 
that it wasn't possible to plug the 
monitor's power cord into the back of 
the computer. The setup video in- 




SUN MOON STAR 
1941 Ring wood Ave. 
San Jose, CA 951 31 

(800) 545-4786 

CPU Type: 386SX; CPU Speed: 16 MHz 

Conventional Memory: 640K; Expanded Memory: 384K 

Ports: 2 serial (mouse attaches to serial port), 1 parallel, 

1 game 

Drives: 5V4-lnch 1,2MB floppy, 43MB hard 

Video Modes: text, CGA, EGA, VGA 

List Price: $2,195 

Street Price: $1,799 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 43 



LAPTOPS...WE STARTED IT ALL ^^ 



f 'l iWM'iVl ^" ^^^^* '^^ introduced 



m^f^ i W 



the world's first laptop computer We went on to engineer built-in software, 



easy-to'read screens 




tms^^msm 



and hard drives in notebook'size PCs. 



AND NOW... 

THE NEW 
TANDF 2810 HD 
NOTEBOOK PC, 



286 Pawer 

The 80C286 micra- 
pracosar nms iir 
16 MH: tor ^pced- 
mten s ivv appUcat ion s 
like Microsoft^ 
Windovvs. 



VGA Graphics 

BhlUimt clarity with 
640 X 480 graphics and 
a sharp 16/ 3 2 -gray scale ^ 



Bin It- In Hard Drive 

20 megabytes of intemRl 
storage tor nipid access, plus 
a 3.5" l.44KiB tloppy drive. 



MS'DOS*4.01 

The latest versjon of 
MS-DOS (4.01) comes 
already i metalled on 
the btiik'in hard drive. 



DeskMate- Interface 

The DeskKiate Graphical 
User Interface with ten 
applicatiom /s in^miled on 
the hard drive for instuni' 
on ease of use. 



Resume Mode 

Lets you shut off and 
come back right where 
you left off~nlso shuts 
down automatically to 
save hatter}' life. 



Externa! Support 

Attach a lOl-key kty- 
board, a VGA color 
monitor, a primer, an 
external floppy drive 
and more. 



1MB Memory 

Expandable to 
five megabytes. 



III, ■■ 










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PiW-ibtlt-h 

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DESKTOP 

PERFORMANCE IN A 6.7-lb. PORTABLE 

Continuing our tradition of innovation, the Tandy 2810 HD is a lightweight laptop for heavy 
use— at the office, at home, or on the road. With extremely durable construction, it's built for 
travel— but it can also support a full -size keyboard and fk^^ ^ #L mS 

monitor for true desktop power. AT® compatibility, JB RwflffO mtloCK. 
stunning VGA graphics and DeskMate® productiv- ^mMHEKIC^t'S 
ity software. Only at Radio Shack. Again. TECHNOLOCV 

Radio Siiack is a division of Tandy Corporation. Microsoft and MS -DOS/ licensed from Microsoft Corp. AT/Reg. TM IBM Corp. 

Circle Read«r Service Number 104 



AJvcruyriiil 



structs you to plug it into the rear power connector, but it 
just doesn't fit 

This system comes with some useful software. Checkit 
is a full-fledged PC diagnostic package that will check your 
system for software and hardware problems. GEM/3 Desk- 
top is an interactive user interface that allows you to run 
programs by pointing and clicking on icons. Draw Plus is a 
full-featured paint program. As you can see, there's plenty 
included to get you started, 

I found no major design flaws in the Sun Moon Star, 
although there are a few things that I don't like. First, the 
keyboard doesn't have that springy, metallic click Fve come 
to expect with'most PC keyboards. I found the mouse too 
small for my liking and awkward to hold. 

The system allows a flexible 

RAM configuration; you can 

populate with 256K chips, 1MB 

chips, or a combination of 

both. You can thus upgrade 

cost effectively. 

On the plus side, I found the Sun Moon Star an attrac- 
tive computer. It's only 1 5 inches wide by 16 inches deep 
and about 7 inches tall You won't lose any desktop space 
with this little computer. It operates very quietly and ap- 
pears to be shielded very well, too. Nearly every computer 
brought into my house interferes with my television, but 
the Sun Moon Star doesn't. 

Sun Moon Star offers an attractive three-year warranty, 
including six months of on-site service and six months of 
carry-in service. According to the company, there are more 
than 800 service centers nationwide. 

TROY TUCKER 



Contiguous Writes 




hmdrtM 

iKWnchdrtv* 






Face to Face With i 

Graphical User 
Interfaces 



Power users are turning to graphical user inter- 
faces (GUIs) tor the case of use they provide. But 
what about those of us without 386 VGA systems? 
Fotrunately, there arc GUIs designed to make com- 
fuiting easier on 8C88, 8086 and 80286^ based sys- 
tems, and one of the most important decisions 
you'll make is choosing which GUI to work with. 

Can We Talk? 

First, you'll want to choose a GUI that "speaks" 
your language— English, plain and simple. That way 
you won't have to learn how to communicate with 
your computer before you start to use it— you'll al- 
ready be on speaking terms. 

Easy Operation 

Second, your GUI should have neat, organized dis- 
plays that present your options clearly and concisely. 
Easy-to-follow graphics make it simple for you to see 
exactly where you are in a program. Handy pull- 
down menus keep y(nir options tucked away and out 
of sight until you call for them. And pop-up dialog 
boxes guide you through tasks, making sure that 
your computer does what you want it to. 

Something in Common 

GUIs provide a uniform operating environment, 
which alleviates the frustration and confusion of 
switching from one task to the next. Programs based 
on the same GUI have the same look and feel to 
them, making each new application easier to learn. 
Of course, you'll also want to choose a GUI sup- 
ported by many of the leading software publishers. 
That way you'll be sure to find readily available soft- 
ware for home, school or business. 

Those Little Extras 

Another feature to look for in a GUI is a help 
function that's context sensitive—one that's able 
to "sense" which task youVe currently running 
and provide help for that specific task. 

For true convenience, your GUI should opetate 
with just the point and click of a mouse cursor con- 
troller. The mouse makes it quick and easy for you 
to select your choices from menus and dialog boxes, 
taking the mazework out of getting arc^und the many 
computing options your GUI offers. 

Fortunately, there is just such a user-friendly GUI: 
Tandy's DeskMate^ Graphical User Interface. h*s af- 
fordable, too— the proven format ofDeskMate gives 
you Instant convenience without having to upgrade 
your system memory hey and 384 K. And it's availa- 
hie from over 7000 Riidio Shack stores across the 
country. So take a scroll through Desk Mate and dis- 
cover for yourself just how easy computing can he. 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 45 



# TEST LAB 



TANDY 1 000 RL/HD 



Tandy's sleek 1000 RL has an in- 
terface especially designed lo ap- 
peal to new computer users and 
hardware that reflects some sound 
but conservative and controversial 
design and manufacture decisions, 

Tandy's decision to use an 8086 
processor, rather than the 286 or even 
386SX, places some limitations on the 
machine's performance. RL/HD own- 
ers will have some difficulty using 
high-end spreadsheets and databases 
and playing some of the more sophis- 
ticated entertainment software. The 



RL's video refresh is fast enough for 
most games, however; and at between 
9 and 10 MHz, the machine is as fast 
as an AT, still the workhorse of the 
computer industry. 

This is a household computer, 
not a terrific machine for handling 
complex work from the office. You*re 
not going to be running Windows on 
the RL. With its kernel in ROM, 
Tandy's DeskMate fiies on the RL, 
obviating for many users the need for 
any other environment than MS-DOS, 

The machine reviewed here is the 



hard disk version, which is the one I 
recommend. The hard disk is fast and 
comes loaded with system and appli- 
cations software, making setup almost 
foolproof Tandy has offered a special 
deal, including a mouse, which is es- 
sential to new users* enjoyment and 
control of their systems. New users 
should also be persuaded to purchase 
color systems, and it's hoped that 
Tandy will add a VGA option to the 
RL Hne. 

Several ports — for a printer Joy- 
sticks, an earphone, a microphone, a 




RADIO SHACK 
A Division of Tandy 
700 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, TX 76102 
(817)878-4969 

CPU Type: 8086; CPU Speed: 10 MHz 
Conventional Memory: 51 2K; Expanded/Ex- 
tended Memory: None 
Ports: 1 serial, 1 parallel, 1 mouse, 1 game 
Drives: 3V2Hnch 720K floppy, 21MB hard 
Video Modes: text, CGA, Tandy 16-color 
List Price: $999.90 with hard drive, $599.95 
without hard drive 

Street Price: $794.00 with hard drive, 
$499.00 without hard drive 



46 COMPUTE MAY 1991 



MM'495Sfc)psTheaock 
QiOva-lOO GEnie Services. 




IBI SMALL 

l|f BUSINESS 



Now enjoy unlimited non- 
prime time usage of over 100 
popular GEnie Service features. 
For just $4.95 a month * You get 
everything from electronic mail to 
exciting games and bulletin 
boards. Nobody else gives you so 
much for so litde. 

Plus enjoy access to softv\^are 
libraries, computer bulletin 
boards, multi -player games and 
more for just $6 per non -prime 
hour for all baud rates up to 
2400. And with GEnie tiiere's no 
sign- up fee. 



Sign-up today. 

Just follow these simple steps. 

1. Set your communication soft- 
ware for half duplex (local echo), 
up to 2400 baud. 

2. Dial toll free 1-800-638-8369. 
Upon connection, enter HHH 



3. At the U*=prompt, enter 
XTX99497,GENIE dien press 
RETURN. 

4. Have a major credit card or 
your checking account number 
ready. 

For more information in 
the US. or Canada, call 
1-800-638-9636. 




GE Information Services 



•Applies only i» L'ii. M<m.-Fri., 6PM-8AM leiaO lime and all d;iy SaL, Sun., and select holitiav-s. Primt timtf hf>uri> rare S18 up if> 24(KJ l>aufi. 

Some featun^ subject to sLtrchai^e and mny not be available outside U5, Prict^ and pniducts listed as of Oct. 1. 1990 subjea to change. 

Telecommunication surcharges may apply. Guarantee limited to one per customer and applies only lo fii^t month of use. 

Circle Reader Service Number 205 



mouse, and serial peripherals — are 
built right in. Tandy's volume control 
is a feature that other manufacturers 
should emulate. Some RL owners, as 
they grow in capability and ambition, 
will fmd the lack of expansion slots 
(there's only one) daunting. A solu- 
tion — an add-on expansion box for 
the RL and at least one more slot in 
the next generation of RLs — ^will help 
the machine grow along with its users. 

The decision to include only 
5 1 2K of RAM, while probably price- 
based, needs to be corrected. For bet- 
ter or worse, today's software 
designers are assuming a megabyte of 
RAM as standard. At the very least, 
the motherboard should be socketed 
for a meg. Understand me: 1 get 90 
percent of my work done in less than 
512Kon my 386. The 1000 RLwill 
do the very same. You can run most 



word processors, some spreadsheets, 
and many other packages just fine. 

Despite these caveats, I think the 
RL is a fine system, especially for us- 
ers who are new to computing. It's a 
system that will work beautifully for 
90 percent of household use. With 
Home Organizer, the DeskMateen- 
hancement, users might actually com- 
puterize whole aspects of household 
operation. 

I think Tandy has taken a large 
step in the right direction with the 
1 000 RL/HD. But the walk is not yet 
finished. As an introductory and func- 
tional computer system with some 
special features and enhancements de- 
signed to put new users at ease, the 
1000 RL is a sound, safe purchase for 
people who are curious about using 
a computer in the home. 

KEITH FERRELL 



FCC Classification 

There are two radio-emission clas- 
sifications for computing devices or 
electronic digital devices: Class A 
and Class B. 

Class A applies to the industri- 
al or business setting, where radio- 
frequency (RF) Interference Is not 
an important concern. In compari- 
son to Class B, Class A enjoys gen- 
erally relaxed limits on the intensity 
of RF emissions. 

Class B devices, however, are 
suitable for a residential setting. 
The rating ensures reasonable 
protection against RF interference 
to television or radio within ten 
meters of the device and with at 
least one wall between the device 
and the receiver. 




4a COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



Now with NRI's 
new training 
you can enjoy 
the rewards of 
a career in 
computer 
programming 

A top-paying career in computer 
programming is no longer out of your 
reach. Now you can get the practical 
training and experience you need to 
succeed in this top-growth field. 

It's training that gives you real- 
world programming skills in four of 
today's hottest computer languages: 
BASIC, Pascal, C, and COBOL. 
Hands-on training that includes 
a powerful IBM AT-compatible 
computer, modem, and program 
ming software you train with and keep 
Comprehensive, at-home training that 
gives you the competitive edge to 
succeed in one of today's leading 
industries. The kind of experience-based 
training only NRl can provide. 

As a L rained compuier programmer of 
the '90's, you can enjoy k")ng-lerm career 
success. In fact, the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics forecasts thai during the next 10 
years job opportunities will increase by 7L7 
percent for the skilled computer program- 
mer. With NRI training you can be one of 
the increasing number of computer 
programmers using their skills to build a 
top-paying career — even a business of their 
own — in this professionally and financially 
rewarding hign-iech field. 

▼ The only programming 
course that includes a powerful 
AT'Compatible computer system 
and programming 
software you keep 

Right from the start, NRl 
training gets you actively involved 
in the challenge of real -world 
computer programming. You 
learn how to create the kinds of 
full- featured, powerful pro- 
grams today s employers and 
clients demand. And, unlike 
any other school, NRl lets 
you experience first-hand 
the power of an IBM PC/ 
AT-compaiible computer 
system with modem, a full 
megabyte of" RAM, disk drive, and moni- 
tor—all yours 10 train with and keep. 




Plus you explore the 
extraordinar)^ capabili- 
ties of not one or two but 
four in-demand computer 
languages. You Icam to design, code, 
run, debug, and document programs in 
BASIC, Pascal, C, and COBOL. In the 
process you become uniquely prepared for 
the wide vatieiy of programming opportuni- 
ties available today. 

▼ No previous 
experience necessary 

Immediately, you start geuing the 
money-making job skills you need to secure 
a future in computer programming — no 
matter what your background. With NRI 
training you move easily from computer 
novice to computer professional with step- 
b)'-step lessons covering program design 
techniques used every' day by successful 
micro and mainfratne programmers. 

You1l ftnd no heavy textbooks to plow 
through. No night classes to attend. Instead, 
NRI s at-home, step-by-step training covers 
all the bases, guiding you from the impor- 



tant fundamentals to real-world methods 
and techniques. With the help of your NRl 
insimctor — offering one-on-one, personal 
guidance throughout your course — you 
quickly gain the skills you need to handle 
with confidence a wide variety of program- 
ming applications. You even use your 
modem to "talk" to your instructor, meet 
other NRl students, and download 
programs through NRFs exclusive program- 
mers network, PRONET, 

▼ Send today 

for yotir FREE catalog 

Now you can have the professional 
and financial rewards of a career in 
computer programming. See how NRl at- 
home training gives you the experience, the 
know-how, the computer, and the software 
you need to get started in this top-paying 
field. Send today for your FREE catalog. 

If the coupon is missing, write to us at 
the NRl School of Computer Programming, 
McGraw-Hill Continuing Education Center, 
4401 Connecticut Avenue, NW. Washing- 
ton, DC 20008. 




n 



m 




^Schools 

McGraw-Hill Continuing Education Center 

4401 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20008 

2] Check one free catalog only 

n Computer Prograirnning D Microcomputer Set^icing 

n PC Systems Analysis D Desktop Publishing and Design 

D PC Software Engineering Using C D Word Processing Home Business 



Name. 



^JSii, 






(please prinO 



-^g^^ 



^m 



Address . 



I Ciiy 



. State , 



Accredited Member, Naiional Home Study Council 



-Zip. 



Circle Reader Service Number 177 



# TEST LAB 



VERIDATA 
LAPPOWER 286/40 



you don't have to leave your pow- 
erful programs in the office and 
settle for stripped-down, floppy- 
based software any more. With a 
detachable keyboard, VGA graphics, a 
speedy 40MB hard drive, a L44MB 
floppy drive, and a moderately power- 
ful processor, the Veridata LapPower 
286/40 may sound a lot like the sys- 
tem on your desktop. 

The Lap Power's boxy case con- 
tains a system of moderate power. 



The 12-MHz 80286 processor is rap- 
idly heading toward obsolescence in 
the desktop world, but if s only now 
becoming the low-end standard in the 
laptop world. Unless you find yourself 
using Windows a lot, though, or play- 
ing games in your spare time, you'll 
find the Veridata' s performance ac- 
ceptable. The system ran Geo Works, 
WordPerfect, and QModem with no 
perceptible loss of performance com- 
pared to my desktop system. 



The VGA graphics are a welcome 
change from the blocky CGA displays 
found on older laptops. Hard and 
floppy disk drive performance are on 
a par with the performance of similar 
drives in a 286 desktop unit. Only the 
keypadless keyboard and LCD screen 
serve to remind you that you're using 
a laptop system. 

Even these minor limitations can 
be remedied, though. The computer 
has an external VGA port, which pro- 



VERIDATA 
11901 GoldringRd. 
Arcadia, CA 91006 
(618)303-0613 

CPU Type: 80286; CPU Speed: 12 MHz 
Conventional Memory: 640K; Extended 
Memory: 384K 

Ports: 1 serial, 1 parallel, 1 video, 1 key- 
board/keypad, 1 floppy drive, 1 expansion 
chassis 

Drives: 3V2-inch 1,44MB floppy, 41MB hard 
Video Modes: text, CGA, EGA, VGA 
Screen Type: ST backlit LCD 
List Price: Not available 
Street Price: $2,049.50 




50 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



The best way to a man's 
stomach. . .NordicTrack 




NordicTrack provides a 
total-body workout* 

Unlike most in-lionic exercisers. 
NordicTrack exercises all llic major 
muscie groups of the body. The 
upper body exerciser works the 
extensor muscles of the back, 
taink, rotators, biceps, triceps, 
chest and upper l^ack. The leg 
exerciser works hip flexors, gluteus 
muscles of the buttocks, thighs, 
hamstrings, knee extensors and 
calves. 

Ail of which will do wonders 
for that spare tire you've l^en 
lugging around. 

It*s time to change the 
spare tire. 

So what are you wailing for? 
Call NordicTrack today. And start 
turning that flabby middle into a 
flat one- 




World's best aerobic exerciser. 



With NordicTrack you can burn 
more calories in less time than with 
any other kind of exercise machine. 
Up to 1,100 calories per hour 
according to fitness experts. 

It's aerobic exercise that not 
only burns more calories, but also 
strengthens the heart, tones the 
muscles and improves stamina. 

NordicTrack simpK' duplicates 
the motion of cross-countr\' skiing. 
which research has show n to be 
the most efficient and effective way 
to get exercise. 

When it comes to losing weight. 



NordicTrack combined with eating 
the proper foods is more effective 
than dieting alone. And a lot less 
stressful on the body than running 
and high-impact spoils. 

This is the way to look as 
good as you feel. 

The best part about losing 
weight with NordicTrack is that it 
feels good. Mentally, it brings your 
productivity and creati\'ity up, and 
your stress dow^n. Physically, it 
makes yon look as good as you feel. 

Circle Reader Service Mumber 143 



NordicTrack 

mm m A CML Company 



Call or Write for a 

FREE VIDEO 

& Brochure 



1-800-328-5888 f?7H, 

O PieiLsc .send nic a ktrc br(K:hure 

a Also a fretf videotape Q VHS □ Hctis 

Name , _^^ 

Sirc'Li 

City , Slate Zip 

Phone { > ^ 



NordicTrack. Depr.* 1 3TE1 , 

j 141C Jonarhan Blvd. K., Chjskd, MK ^y->l8 | 



vided a clear and speedy color display 
on my Mitsubishi Diamondscan color 
monitor. Vcridata ofTers an optional 
slrap-on numeric keypad that attaches 
to the right side of the laptop's detach- 
able keyboard. You can also attach 
any standard PC keyboard that uses 
the PS/2 style connector, an option 
you may want to consider if you don'i 
like soft, mushy keyboards. The Lap- 
Power's keyboard is quiet but has a 
very short throw and doesn't provide 
much tactile feedback. 

The 1 6-gray-scale LCD display is 
crisp but suffers from severe smearing 
and ghosting. Brightness and contrast 
arc adjustable but not enougli to elim- 
inate the ghosting. While the LCD dis- 
play is OK for use on the road, you'll 
want to keep a VGA monitor in the 
office. 

There's an expansion connector 
on the back of the LapPower for an 
optional expansion box thai accepts 
industry-standard cards. You'll also 



find a port for an external S'A-inch 
disk drive, and an internal 2400-baud 
modem can be added by your dealer. 
Attach the card box. full-size key- 
board, disk drive, monitor, and serial 
mouse to the laptop and close the 

The computer has an 

external VGA port, 
which provided a clear 

and speedy color 
display on my monitor. 

LCD display; and youll never know 
youTC using a laptop. 

The system has a battery life of 
about two hours with the LCD and 
hard drive in constant use. The in- 
cluded PowerCon utility will shut 
down the hard drive and backlit LCD 
and toggle the microprocessor into a 



standby mode after a user-defined pe- 
riod of inactivity. 

Other than the less-than-satisfac- 
tor>- LCD display, the only real prob- 
lem with the LapPower is poor docu- 
mentation. The LapPower 286/40 is 
sold by companies other than Veri- 
data. so the program includes a gener- 
ic 1 79-page book called the Laptop 
Operation Manual that's inadequate 
as a tutorial or reference guide and in- 
cludes no information on customer 
support or even how to contact Veri- 
data. YouMl need to depend on the 
dealer from whom you purchase the 
unit for support. 

If you're looking for a laptop PC 
that can also serve as an all-purpose 
desktop machine, the LapPower may 
be the machine for you. If you're look- 
ing for a machine to use specifically 
on the road, though, you can probably 
fmd a smaller and lighter unit at a 
comparable price, 

DENNY ATKIN 




52 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



HOME OFFICE- FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT- CHALLENGE AND DISCOVERY 



WHATEVER YOUR HOME COMPUTING NEEDS, 

CQIUIPUTE 

IS YOUR HOME COMPUTING RESOURCE 



The Official F-W Stealth Fighter 
Handbook 

by Richard G, Sheffield 
Foreword by Major "Wild Bill' Stealey, 
president and cofounderof MicroProse 
$14J5 192pp 

Learn the ms and outs of flying 
MicroProse s nev^ F-W Stealth Fighter 
flight simulator Study the practical hints 
and tips lor flying the simuiator and 
performing ground-attack and air-to-air 
tactics. Then read all the background 
information in the book to learn to fly the 
real F-19- In the final section of the book, 
you'll find yourself looking over the 
shoulder of an expert F-19 Stealth Fighter 
game player as he carries out several 
dangerous missions. 

Easy 1'2'3 for Small Business 

by Sandrn Cook Jerome. C.P.A, 
$18.95 320pp 

This hands-on guide is perfect for small- 
business owners who need financial 
reports and information quickly. It is more 
than iust another tutorial on Lotus 1-2-3: 
it's a guide to building practical spread- 
sheets. You get complete instructions tor 
creating more than a dozen spreadsheets, 
including income statements, job costing, 
tax planning, balance sheets, and 
accounts-receivable aging. Youll even 
learn to write a business plan. Although 
written specifically for Lotus t-2-3 
releases 2.2 and 3. the spreadsheets in 
Easy 1-2-3 for Small Business are also 
compatible with release 2.01. 




COMPUTEI's Guide to Nintendo 
Games 

by Steven A. Schwartz 

S9.95 272pp 

A valuable buyer's guide, this book is 
packed with tips for better play and 
reviews of available game cartridges for 
the Nintendo Entertainment System. Each 
game cescription includes a screen shot; 
basic information sucn as type of game, 
number of players, and controller type: 
and ratings for the essential elements 
such as sound and graphics quality, 
violence, difficulty, and overall play value- 



Outcl( & Easy Guide to Using 
IVIS-DOS, Second Edition 

by Bonnie Derman and 

Strawberry Software 

514.95 224pp 

The second edition of this easy-to-use 
guidebook covers all versions of MS-DOS 
through version 4, Commands and 
directions are logically arranged tor quick 
reference. Topics include directories, 
files, disk commands, screen and printer 
output, and more. Its the only MS-DOS 
book that employs a truly task-oriented 
approach. 



PCSpeedScript 

by Randy Thompson, associate editor 

at COMPUTE! Publications 

S24.95 224pp 

SpeedScript, a full-featured word 
processor and the most popular program 
ever published by COMPUTE' , is now 
available for IBM. Tandy and compatible 
personal computers. From letters and 
reports to novels and term papers, PC 
SpeedScript handles all your word 
processing needs. This S^^^-mch disk 
contains me ready-to-run PC SpeedScnpt 
program and t^e Turbo Pascal source 
code Vou do not need BASIC or Turbo 
Pascal lo run the programs. The package 
includes a 224-page book with complete 
documentation and source code listings. 

PFS: First Choice 
Business Solutions 

by EIna Tymes with Charles Praet 
518.95 256pp 

This book IS a must for all PFS: First 
Choice business users Automate office 
chores with a complete range of business 
models; inventory, forecasting, commis- 
sion records, presentations, telecom- 
munications, P & L analysis, and so much 
more, PFS: First Choice software from 
Software Publishing is not included. 



r' 



"] 



DYES! 



COMPUTE is my home computing 
resource. Please send me the titles checked below. 






a COWPUTEI's Guide to Nintendo Games (2214) $9.95 1 

D Easy h24 for Small Business (2052) $18.95 

D PC SpeedScript (1668) $24.95 " 

DPfS; First Choice Business Solutions (2087) $14,95 

D Quici< & Easy Guide to Using MS-DOS, Second Edition {2184) $14.95 

D The oHicial F-19 Stealth Fighter Handljook (2176) $14.95 

Subtotal 

Sales Tax {Residents of NC, NY, and NJ add appropriate sales 

tax). Canadian orders, add 7% goods and services tax. 
Shipping ahd Handling ($2 per t)ool< U.S., S4 Canadian. S6 

foreign) 
Total enclosed 



D Check or Money Order n MasterCard D VISA 



Signature _ 
Acct. No. _ 



I'Requi^ftJj 



. Exp. Date . 



Name. 



Street Address , 



Cfty. 



Daytime Telephone No. , 



_ State ZIP - 



All orders nujst be paid in U.S. funds drawn on a US. bank. 

Ontefs will be shtpped via UPS Gnxjnd Senflce. Offer good v^ile suppli^ last 



MAIL TO COMPUTE Books 
c/o CCC 

25C0 McClellan Avenue 
Pennsauken, NJ 08109 



MAY91CA 



# TEST LAB 



ZEOS NOTEBOOK 286 



With most laptop computers, 
you have to accept trade-offs. 
A laptop that's small and light- 
weight will cost you more than 
one that's large and heavy. If you 
want a high-resolution screen and a 
fast processor, it will cost you even 
more. Until recently, most of us 
couldn't afford a laptop that was both 
powerful and portable. 

The Zeos Notebook 286 is one of 
the first of a new generation of no- 
compromise laptops. For $1,995, you 
get a 7-pound notebook-sized com- 
puter with a 1 2-MH2 80286 processor, 
1MB of RAM (expandable to 5MB), a 
backlit VGA screen with 32 shades of 
gray, a fast 20MB hard drive, and a 
1.44MB 3V2-inch floppy drive. 

Besides being a genuine bargain, 
the Zeos Notebook 286 is also intelli- 
gently designed. Because a backlit 
screen, hard drive, and 286 processor 
can quickly drain a laptop battery, 
Zeos has built in several power-saving 
features. You can switch the processor 
speed from 12 MHz to 6.5 MHz, re- 
duce screen brightness by half, and 
have the computer shut off power to 
the hard drive and LCD screen when 
they're not being used. 

Using the power-saving features, 
you can extend the standard two-hour 
battery life to nearly three hours. 
When the battery has only about 3-6 
minutes of power left, the low-battery 
light blinks slowly — giving you ample 
time to back up your files. With 1-3 
minutes left, the light blinks faster. 

The battery charger is ex- 
ceptionally fast and versatile. 
When the computer is 
switched off, recharging 
the batter>^ lakes only 
about an hour. Even 
more impressive, you can 
recharge the batter>' in about 
two hours while you continue to 
use the laptop. 

Before you buy any laptop, you 
should spend as much time as you can 



ZEOS INTERNATIONAL 
530 5th Ave. 
St. Paul, MN 55112 
(800) 423-5891 

CPU Type: 80286; CPU Speed: 12 MHz 

Conventional Memory: 640K; Extended 

Memory: 384K 

Ports: 1 serial, 1 parallel, 1 video 

Drives: 3V2-incK 1.44MB floppy, 21MB hard 

Video Modes: text, CGA, EGA, VGA 

Screen Type: LCD with CCFT backlight 

List Price: $1,995 

Street Price: $1,995 (sold only through Zeos) 




S4 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



New From COMPUTE'S Bookshelf 



From testing a temperamental drive and 

decipliering DOS to building your own Turbo Pascal 

programs, we've gottiie books to 

POWERUPYOIIRPC 



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S24.95 224pp 

SpmdScript, a full-featured word processor and the 
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S14.95 224pp 

The second edition of this easy-to-use guidebook covers 
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Topics include directories, files, disk commands, screen 
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Fr 



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checked beiow. 



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want to power up my PC. Please send me the titles 



D Check or Money Order 
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D Malntaimng, Upgrading and Troubleshooting IBM PCs, Con^patibles, 

and PS/2 Personal Computers (2303) $18.95 
D PC SpeedScript (1668) $24.95 

D Quick & Easy Guide to Using MS-DOS, Second Edition (2184) $14.95 
D Releasing the Power of DOS (1862) $21.95 
D Turho Pascal Building Blocks, Second Edition (182X) $19.95 
D Turbo Pascal Building Stocks Disk $12.95 

Subtotal 

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MflrgiCB 



Norton Indexes 

The Norton computing, disk, and 
overall indexes show you how well 
a computer performs when com- 
pared to a 4.77-fv1Hz XT. Such an 
XT has a value of 1 .0. If a computer 
Is twice as fast, it will have a value 
of 2.0. The greater the index value, 
the faster the computer— and the 
faster your applications will run. 

The CPU (Central Processing 
Unit) speed test rates the micro- 
processor's performance. The disk 
index rates the performance of a 
system's hard drive. The overall 
performance index factors in, 
among other things, the CPU and 
disk indexes. 



trying out the keyboard. The Note- 
book 286's keyboard has 82 flill-size 
keys, 1 2 function keys, and an embed- 
ded numeric keypad— all with a full 
key travel. The keys have a firm feel 
(not too mushy), and they're extreme- 
ly quiet (you won't disturb others on a 
plane). On the downside, I miss the 
audible click of the keys, the Enter 
and right Shift keys are smaller than 
usual, and you have to use a special 
Fn key to access the embedded PgUp, 
PgDn, Home, and End keys. 

While the Zeos Notebook 286 is, 
indeed, a great little laptop, you would 
actually be better off buying another 
machine. For just $300 more, you can 
buy the same machine from Zeos with 
a 16-MHx 80386SX processor. The 
Notebook 386SX adds a math co- 



processor option and includes a black- 
and-white screen instead of the Note- 
book 286's blue-and- while screen. 
With either machine, you'll have 
enough power to mn Windows 3.0. 
Zeos has proven that good things do 
come in small packages. 

DAVID ENGLISH 



All Benchmark/Performance Testing is 
conducted by Computer Product Testing 
Services, Inc. (CRTS), using benchmark 
software developed by COMPUTE Pub- 
lications International Ltd. CPTS is an in- 
dependent testing and evaluation 
laboratory based In Manasquan, New 
Jersey. Every effort has been made to 
ensure the accuracy and completeness 
of this data as of the date of testing. Per- 
formance may vary among samples. 




5€ COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



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a Interleave Adjustment Utility— Fine-tune your hard disk's interleave. 
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Some questions may require more than one answer. 

Mail questionnaires to COMPUTE Readership Survey, 324 West Wendover Avenue Suite 200 
Greensboro, North Carolina 27408. 



What computer{s) do you own or use? 

D IBM PC XT, or compatible 

D IBM PCjr 

DAT or 80286 

D80386-basedPC 

n Tandy 

D Laptop 

D Other 



n I don't own a computer. 

Which video display system(s) do you use? 

D Monochrome 

D Hercules 

DCGA 

DEGA 

D MCGA or VGA 

D Tandy 

Which peripherals do you ohti or use with your computer? 

D 5 '/i -inch disk drive 

D 3 '/2-inch disk drive 

D Hard disk 

D Dot-matrix printer 

D Letter-quality printer 

D Laser printer 

n PostScript printer 

D Modem 

D Mouse 

D Joystick 

n MIDI device 

n Sound card 

D CD-ROM 

How much memory^ does your computer have? 

D128K 
n256K 
n384K 
D512K 

n640K 

D Expanded memor>' 

D Extended memorv 



W^hich language do you prefer for programming? 
n BASIC 

D Assembly language 

n Pascal 

DC 

D Other 



D I don't program. 

Which version of DOS do you use? (Check one,) 

04.0 or higher 
D 3.0 or higher 
D 2.0 or higher 
D LO or higher 

Do you use Microsoft Windows? 

DYes 
DNo 



W hich columns do you like the most? 

D Editorial License 

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□ Disk Update 
a Point & Click 

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Which of the following computer-related topics do you like to 
read about? 

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D New hardware 

D How to upgrade your PC 

n Word processing 

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D Databases 

n Telecommunications 

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□ Disk management and MS-DOS 
n Programming 

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Where do you use your PC? 

DHome 

DWork 

n School 

Where did you get this copy of COMPUTET 

D Subscription 
D Newsstand 

What topic(s) would you like to see covered regularly in a 
column? 



Additional comments: 



58 



COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



See The World 




And Never Leave Home 



Discover a world beyond 

word processing and spread 

sheets. Let your computer take 

you to new lands. Take flight! 

Spread your wings and travel to 

exotic places. Let your computer 

thrill you with new experiences. 




To learn more about 
home software, call 
for our free colorful 
brochure, "The Other 




CONSUMER 
SOFTWARE 
SECTION 



Software Publishers Association 

1 1 01 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 901 

Washington, DC 20036 



1-900-860-1543 

$2.00 the first minute and $1 .00 each additional minute 
11 you are under 18 please getytHJr parsftts permission bef ore dialing. • 



Side of Computing". 
It describes the variety of software 
you can use on your computer. 
Let your computer entertain and 
educate you! 



Circle fleader Service Numbor 144 





-^^ ' 




o 



^' ii 






V*' 



^J 



HOW TO CHOOSE 
A HARD DISK 



CHOOSING A HARD DISK CAN BE TRICKY. 
HERE'S EXPERT ADVICE. 



Buying a hard disk is confusing nowadays. How big? What brand? HoW about 
RLL? There's a lot to worry about. Here's how to kick the tires and read the EPA 
mileage sticker when you're shopping for a drive (or a PC with a drive). 
Your hard disk subsystem consists of two pieces: the hard disk itself and the 
hard disk controller board. The controller is usually a circuit board in your PC, although 
some newer computers put the controller's electronics right on the main PC circuit 
board, the motherboard. 

A few years ago, you wouldn't worry about buying a controller; you'd just use the 
one that came standard with your machine (in the case of an AT-type system) or buy a 
disk/controller combination all at once (in the case of an XT-type system). Since you 
have a variety of choices in drives and controllers, you've got to make sure that they can 
talk to each other. 

Making these choices may seem a bit daunting, but read on — hard drives aren't 
tough to understand. And having a grasp of the terms found here will allow you to pick 
the right drive for your system. Here's a quick look at your options. 

Drive options. You must choose size, seek time (which affects speed), band stepper 
or voice coil, and the drive's self-parking capability. 

Controller options. Here you choose XT, AT, or PS/2; the interieave factor (which af- 
fects speed); whether or not to get an on-board cache; and the drive's sector translation. 

Matching drive and controller. There are several items that must match on the drive 
and controller, including the interface (ST506, SCSI, ESDI, or IDE) and encoding 
scheme (MFM or RLL). > 



MARK Ml NASI 



MAY 1991 COMPUTE 61 



What Size Is Best? 

Many computers these days are ad- 
vertised as coming with 40MB drives, 
but assess your needs carefully before 
jumping at such a package. The sad 
truth is that virtually every program 
you buy will demand a few megab\1es 
of your disk's space, and you'll soon 
be looking for more room. 

For example, the popular Micro 
grafx Designer drawing program gob- 
bles up five megabytes in a basic 
configuration (ii can lake much 
more), Windows 3.0 lakes up about 
seven megabytes without a swap file, 
and even old Lotus 2.1 requires a cou- 
ple of megs. 

That doesn't even consider the 
real biggies, like OS/2 (more than 
30MB when its Exi ended Edition is 
loaded). Downloadable fonts can suck 
up space in no time. And greater use 
of graphics strains the disk further. 
For example, a nongraphic computer 
screen can be stored in just 4K; a 
graphical screen can take up a mega- 
byte. Your 40 megabytes of space will 
disappear in no time. 

Economics seems to favor 80MB 
or larger drives. The typical 42MB 
drive (the Seagate ST25 1-1 is the most 
common) runs about $300.00 dis- 
counted, or about $7.50 per megabyte. 
In contrast, Maxtor's 80MB drive is 
now selling for as low as $410.00, or 
$5. 13 per megabyte. Further, the 
Maxtor is a voice-coil drive, which is 
preferable to the 251- Ts band-stepper 
design. (Fear not, explanations of 
voice coil and band stepper are com- 
ing up soon,) 

And when shopping for really big 
drives, watch out for an old scam, re- 
porting ''unformatted" drive capacity. 
Drives must give up as much as 30 
percent of their capacity for system 
overhead. For example, a 20MB drive 
may actually have 26MB of capacity, 
but the extra 6MB is required for sys- 
tem overhead. 

Every drive has this meaningless 
^'unformatted" capacity that looks im- 
pressive but is of no value to the buy- 
en Look out for unscrupulous dealers 
who report the larger, useless unfor- 
matted capacity in their magazine ads. 
(By the wsiy, format in this article 
means low-level — not the famihar 
DOS^ormat: it's something general- 
ly handled by your dealer.) 

Seeking the Fastest Drive 

Part of what makes a drive subsystem 
fast is how fast a drive can move its 
read/write head over the data you 
want — that is, how long it takes to 
find the data. The average time to fmd 
an area on disk is called the seek time, 
and it's measured in milliseconds (ms, 
thousandths of seconds). The lower 
the number, the better. 



Hard Drive Interfaces 



Interface 


Transfer Rate 


Encoding Method 


ST506 


250K-750K/second 


MFM or RLL 


SCSI 


1MB-3MB/second 


RLL 


ESDI 


1MB-3MB/S6cond 


RLL 


IDE 


IMB/second 


ARLL 



Don't buy a drive with a seek 
time larger than 28 ms> The best on 
the market are in the 10-12 ms 
range — you'll know from the price 
tag which those are. 

Band Steppers and Voice Coils 

.4 lot of what makes a drive fast or 
slow is whether it moves its read/ 
write head with a band stepper or a 
voice coil 

Cheaper drives move the head to 
and fro over the disk surface with a 
combination of flexible metal bands 
and a stepper motor, hence the name 
band stepper. They rely on a mechani- 
cal approach to find data, an approach 
that isn't reliable in the long term, as 
the mechanical parts do not display 
consistent behavior over time; telling 
a new drive head to move 1/1000 inch 
may yield different actual movement 
than making the same request of an 
older drive. 

The alternative is a voice coil. 
Named after the voice-coil circuit 
used in telephone electronics, this is a 
coil with a cylindrical rod at its mid- 
dle. When the coil is energized, the 
rod moves in or out of the coil, de- 
pending on how much energy is used. 
The rod is connected to the heads, so 
energizing the coil moves the heads in 
or out. Meanwhile, as the heads are 
moving, they're reading address infor- 
mation from the drive; that way, the 
head knows whether it's found the de- 
sired data or not 

Which is belter? The voice coil, 
for three reasons. First, and most im- 
portant, the voice coil is a constantly 
self-adjusting system; the mechanical 
parts may change with time, but the 
head will always find the data. The 
stepper acts on the unrealistic idea 
that its mechanicals will never change 
as lime goes on. Second, the voice coil 
parks its head automatically when the 
drive is shut down, thus protecting the 
disk. Most steppers require you to run 
a head-parking program of some kind. 
Third, voice coils are generally faster 
than band steppers. 

You'll find that most 80MB and 
larger drives are voice coil, so buying 
large drives will pay off in reliability 
and speed as well as capacity. 

Get in Control 

If your computer already has a con- 
troller, you needn't worry about pick- 
ing a new one. Or should you? 



Superpowerful controllers now ap- 
pearing on the market can squeeze the 
last ounce of performance out of a 
drive. 

First, make sure your PC can use 
the controller! Your controller must 
be made to work with your computer. 
Vendors sell XT-type controllers; also 
called 8-bit controllers, and AT-style 
controllers, also called I6'bit control- 
lers. An XT controller can work in an 
AT system (albeit slowly), but an AT 
controller generally won't work in an 
XT system. There are some PS/2 mi- 
crochannel controllers, but the market 
for them isn't large, as all the PS/2 
microchannel computers come stand- 
ard with a fairiy fast controller. 

Next, make sure it's a speedy 
controller. We've seen that an impor- 
tant determinant of a drive's speed is 
its seek time. Controllers also contrib- 
ute to the speed of your disk subsys- 
tem with their interieave factor. 

The seek time refers to how long 
it takes to find the data on disk. The 
interieave factor tells how quickly the 
disk subsystem can read the data, 
once it*s been found. Interieave fac- 
tors look like 1:6, 1:3, 1:1, and the 
like. A lower second number is better, 
so 1:1 is the best. Controllers that 
feature 1:1 interleave used to be very 
expensive — $400 or more for AT sys- 
tems—but now they're about $ 1 20, 
only about $20 more than the more 
common and slower 1:2 controllers. 

If you're buying an AT system 
(286, 386SX, or 386) today, insist on 
1:1. Buyers of XT systems will find 
1:3 controllers their best bargain; there 
aren't any 1 : 1 XT controllers, and the 
1:2 controllers are a bit expensive. All 
microchannel PS/2 systems come 
standard with 1:1 controllers. 

Maintaining Cache Flow 

Most 1 : 1 controllers include a speed- 
enhancing feature called on-board 
cache A cache is necessary because 
hard disks retrieve data thousands of 
times more slowly than your comput- 
er's RAM. Every time the computer 
needs to read the hard disk, it must 
twiddle its thumbs, waiting (and wait- 
ing and waiting . . .) for a device that 
seems, in terms of CPU speeds, posi- 
tively geological in time scale. 

It would be nice just to copy the 
whole hard disk to the much-faster 
RAM, but that's impractical. Buying 
even enough RAM to accommodate a 



62 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 






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□ FormGen (1630) - Design and print 
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Q FormGen Fill (1631) - Fill out 
Forn^G en-created forms more quickly 
and accurately- (requires FormGen) 
a FormGen Business Forms (1 632) - 
An excellent collection of pre-designed 
business forms, (req. FormGen) HD 
U Doctor Data Label (1717) - A pro- 
fessional mail list manager. ^0. 512K 
a Checkmate (1102) - A complete 
checkbook manager. IHandles unlim- 
ited accounts and does reconciliation. 
a Business Kit (1 656) -Two programs 
for smalt businesses: Simple Book- 
keeper and Billing Statement. 
a Solve-lt! (1618) - An excellent fi- 
nancial calculations package. 

□ Invoice-It (1664) - Keep track of in- 
voices, merchandise, vendors and 
customers at tfie point of sate. HD 

U Names and Dates (1619,1620) - An 
address book, calendar system, and 
mailing list combination. (2 disks) ^^^^< 
U ZPAY 3 (1610, 1611) - A simple- to* 
use, tult-featjred payroll package. HD 
a PC-Areacode (1 665) - Helps you find 
the areacode for any city in the U.S. or 
Canada quickly and easiiy. 



EDUCATION 



3 FREE DISKS!! 



LIMITE 



SPREADSHEET 



J Computer Tutor (1235)- Become a 
more effective computer user, 

□ School Mom (1 251 ) - Teaches kids 
2-14 the basics of art, music, speilinq, 
English and math. FANTASTICIl! 0(Sk 
Q World (1221) - A computer ency* 
clopedia of global information. CGA 
J Typing Tutor (1224) - Helps you 
improve your speed and accuracy. CGA 

□ Total Recall (1245) - This program 
helps you quickly memorize words and 
information on any subject, 

□ Algebrax (1233) - A ^reat program 
that teaches algebra. CbA. DOb 3.0 
LI Pre-Calculus (1 21 8) - Excellent pre- 
calc tutor Reviews algebra and trig. 

□ Play n' Learn (1 236) - A collection of 
learning games for children, CGA 

□ KinderMath (1262) - An excellent 
math tutor for children. Three levels of 
difficulty. Very entertaining. CGA 

Zl Word Whiz (1252) - A challenging 
word game that tests your vocabulary. 
Zl Word Gallery (1 256) - Teaches kids 
to link written words with objects. ^G^"^- 
J Our United States (1 255) - Test your 
knowledge of United States trivia, 
U Animated Shapes (1 264) - Teaches 
shapes and colors to pre-schoolers 
using animated graphics. 640K, EGA 



UTILITIES 



J Auto Menu (1409) - A professional 
hard disk menu system. Run any of 
your programs from a customized 
menu. Hu 

U ViruScan (1440) - Make sure your 
computer is vi rus-( ree with this valuable 
utility. Highly recommended! 

□ Tree View (1 41 8) - A superior"DOS 
command shell with puil-down menus. 

□ Telix (1422) - The best telecommu- 
nications program available. HD 



□ On Side (1506) - Prints your 
spreadsheets (or any file) sideways. 
a As-Easy-As (1805) - A fantastic Lo- 
tus 1-2-3 compatible spreadsheet. 

□ LotusLearningSys-(1810.1811)A 
complete package that makes it easy 
to learn Lotus 1-2-3. (2 disks) HD 



MS WINDOWS 3.0 



These programs require Windows 3.0. 
»l Almanac (1470) - An excellent cal- 
endar/information utility. 
~j Icon Library (1 481 ) - Customize your 
Windows operating environment with 
this collection of over 300 icons. 
J Wallpaper (1484) - A collection of 
wallpaper to decorate your Windows. 
J Active Life (1472) • A powerful 
system for managing your active busi- 
ness and personal life. 
J Icondraw (1478) - Create your own 
icons to use with Windows. 
3 Command Post (1 474) - Allows you 
to create custom menus that can ex- 
ecute applications automatically. 
J Metz Desktop Applications (1465) 
- Create menus and easily access files 
and d ire dories - 

3 Screen Peace (1486) * A FANTAS- 
TIC screen saver with many beautiful 
and interesting variations. 
Zi Change Cursor Utility (1487) - Al- 
lows you to design your own arrow and 
hourglass cursors to use with Windows. 



APPLICATIONS 



U Trip Planner (1331) - A computer- 
ized road map. Computes best route. 
Very popular! 

3 Melody Maker (1918) - A fun and 
easy-to-use program for new or expe- 
rienced music students. Comes with 
several songs. 

J PC Beat (1909) - Turns your com- 
puter into a drum machine. A lot of fun! 
3 Calendar Mate (1344) - A full-fea- 
tured program designed to create per* 
sonallzed calendars. 
G Lotto! (1313) - Win the lottery with 
the help of your computer! 

□ By the Numbers (1342) - Provides 
you with a complete numerological in* 
terpretation. ^'^v '>10K 

□ Bowl 101 (1346) - A user-friendly 
bowling league management program, 
a The Electric Almanac (1341) - A 
source for lots of useful information. 



GRAPHICS 



U PrintShop Graphics (1 503) - A large 
collection of PrintShop clip art, 
U Picture Label (1501) - An excellent 
label printing program that uses 
PrintWaster or PrintShop graphics. 
a Banner Maker (1502) - Prints ban- 
ners in various sizes, styles, and fonts. 
J Dazzle (1530) - An amazing ran- 
domized color pattern generator. Per- 
formance art for the eyes! t-^' ''^ or v ^^s A 



EGA GAMES 



ij The Last Half of Darkness (1 962) - 

Scary graphics and mysterious puzzles 
to challenge your mind. i-<^'A HD 
U Dark Ages (1964) - A brilliant ar- 
cade/adventure game with superb 
graphics and animation. -lOOK, EGA, 
286 or faster machine. 
U Poker Slot (1 989) - Plays just like the 
video poker machines Ypu see in casi- 
nos. Great graphics! ^^^^, mouse 
J Commander Keen (1986) - One of 
the best games we have ever seen. 
Exceptional play and graphics. EGA 
G Snarf (1 987) - Travel through various 
mazes while you pick up treasures and 
avoid the Snarfs. EGA 



HOME & FAMILY 



U Fami ly Tree Journal (1 1 22, 1 1 23) - 

Presents you r genealogical i nformation 
in book form. (2 disks) ^^^ 
J Home Inventory (1 1 05) - Keeps track 
of all your personal property. 
U Personal Budget Tools (1108) - 
Provides a simple way to plan for annual , 
semi-annual, and quarterly expenses, 
-} Edna's Cookbook (1 1 1 8,1 1 1 9) - An 
electronic cookbook with several great 
recipes * add your own! (2 disks) 
J Will Kit (1 343) - Create your own will 
valid in all 50 states. 
3 C, A.B.S. (1 1 26) - Keeps a complete 
record of your auto expenses. 
3 Cash Control (1 1 27) - Manage your 
bank accounts the fast and easy way 
with this great program, 320K 
:j Topp's Grocery Program (1136) - 
Helps you prepare grocery lists, man- 
age coupons, and track savings. ^"'^ 



WORD 
PROCESSING 



UWP 5.0/5.1 Clip Art (1875,1876) -A 

large collection of clip art to add spice to 

your WP documents. {2 disks) 

Q PC Write 3,03 (1851-1853) - A very 

popular full-featured word processor. 

(3disks)HD.5l2K 

J WP 5,1 Learning System (1865- 
1867) - Be a more proficient WP user. 
(3dlsks)HD, 612K^ 

Q Readability Plus (1340) - A com- 
puterized writing style analyzer. 
_1 Grab Plus/Laser Label (1 883, 1884) 
Takes addresses from a word proces- 
sor and sends them to the printer. ^D 
Circle Reader 



IMPORTANT 

CGA = Requires Color Computer 
EGA = Requires min. EGA adapter 

HD = Requires Hard Drive 
512K = Requires 51 2K RAM 
For multi-disk sets 
count alt disks in set 



* When you order and pay for 5 or 
more disks, select an additional 3 
disks FREE (limit 3 free per order) 



GAMES 



3 Double Blocks (1970) - A TER- 
RIFIC Tetris clone for 1 or 2 players. 
Records top scores. You will love this!! 

□ Video Poker/Ultima 21 (1 945) - The 
BEST poker and blackiack games! 

G Miramar Flight Simulator (1967) - 
You are in control of ali the speed and 
fire-power an F*1 8 h^s to offerl (will not 
work with Tandy s) CGA 

□ Pharaoh's Tomb (1974) - Face 
monsters and traps as you explore the 
pyramid. Your goal is to survive. 

G Bass Tour ( 1 925) - Fish in your choice 
of lakes. Try to win the trophy. 
D ZZT (1921) - Test your problem 
solving ability and your arcade skills as 
you battle your way through 43 rooms. 

□ Field General (1931) - Experience 
the excitement of a pro footbalj game 
from a coach's point of view, CGA. HD 
J Insanity (1936) - Find your way out 
of this maze before going insane! '- -•''^ 
Q The l^onuments of Mars! (1920) - 
Many tough levels filled with jauzzles, 
traps and creatures. 3^>0K, CC iA 



VGA GAMES 



3 Shooting Gallery (1990) - Seven 
variations of a shooting range on your 
computer screen. '■' ''-^^\ mouse 
3 VGA Sharks (1992) - Recover lost 
treasure in shark infested waters in this 
action arcade game. ^-^GA 
3 Beyond Tetris/Joust (1997) - Be- 
yond is like Tetns with a twist. Joust is 
a VGA rendition of the classic. '-^OA 
3 VGA Jigsaw (1 993) - Uses beautiful 
pfctu res to create puzzles for you to put 
back together. '-^^A 

Service Number 198 



Name_ 
Address , 
City 



State 

Phone ( ) . 
Visa/MC#_ 



,Zip. 



Exp. Date / 

Signature ^ 

Disks Ordered 

xS2.49orS1.99each...$_ 



:j Need 3 1/2" disks? 
If so - add $1 per disk 
(including Uee disks) . . . S 

Packing & Handling . . . S 3 .Q 
Foreign Shipping Charge 
(Canada S2 / Other S4) S 

jCOD (U.S. Only) 
add $4 if you req. COD S 

J Federal Express - add S4 
(Continental U.S. only) $, 

TOTAL $ 



J Check MO J Visa/MC 3 CO.D. 



GOLD HILL 
SOFTWARE 



«ul<l Hill. OK 9Zy27, 



^ ORDER TODAY m 
1 -800-234-6467 p^._ 



20MB disk would be prohibitively 
expensive. 

Computer designers have no- 
ticed, however, that most of us seem 
to return to the same areas on the disk 
over and over again. Even though 
your hard disk is 20MB in size, you 
may do 90 percent of your work in 
just 2MB or so. That's where a cache 
comes in. 

A cache is a TSR (memory-resi- 
dent) program that sets aside some of 
your PCs memory as a temporary 
holding area. It then monitors your 
disk usage. Every time DOS goes to 
read a file, the cache transparently 
copies that file's contents to its hold- 
ing area in memory. Then, if DOS 
needs to reread that file later, the 



Hard-Driving Acronyms 



ARLL. Advanced Run Length Limited is 
a data-encoding method used in IDE 
drives that allows storage of 50 percent 
more data than standard RLL and 100 
percent more data than MFM. 

ESDI. Enhanced Small Device Interface 
is an interface standard that puts some 
controller functions on the drive (tself- 
ESDI allows for data transfers of 
1 MB^3MB per second and can be used 
for drives up to 1 gigabyte in size, 

IDE. Integrated Drive Electronics, like 
SCSI, is an interface design that puts 
the controller on the drive Itself. IDE» 
however, only offers ST506 
performance. 

MB. One megabyte is 1,000,000 bytes, 
or1,000K. 

MFM. Modified Frequency Modulation 
is a data-encoding method that has 
been the standard until recently. Now, 
RLL is more common, at least for high- 
capacity drives. 

ms. One millisecond is 1/1000 second. 

Milliseconds are commonly used to 
measure a hard disk's seek time. 

RLL Run Length Limited, like MFM, is a 
data-encoding method, but RLL allows 
storage of 50 percent more data than 
MFM. 

SCSI. Small Computer System Interface 
is an interface standard that puts most 
of the controller functions on the drive it- 
self. It offers transfer speeds of 
1 MB-4MB per second. SCSI also al- 
lows as many as eight devices to be 
daisychained together. 

ST506. Shugart Technologies' 506/412 
interface is an interface that supports 
transfer speeds of about 500K per sec- 
ond and is limited to a hard disk of 
127.5MB or smaller. 



cache supplies the file to DOS, fooling 
DOS into thinking that the infor- 
mation came from the disk drive. 

The benefit? The file reread oc- 
curs by transferring information from 
memory to memory, rather than 
from disk to memorv, yielding much 
faster apparent disk performance. If 
you have expanded or extended mem- 
ory that you aren't using, putting in a 
cache program is an ideal way to 
speed up your disk subsystem. 

PC Tools, Mace, and The Norton 
Utilities all include cache programs, or 
you may want to pick up a copy of 
Multisoft's PC-Kwik (call Multisoft at 
503-644-5644). If you've got the mem- 
or>' for one, a 5 1 2K cache will speed 
up apparent disk speed quite a bit. 
Now that computer memory is so 
much cheaper, you may want to 
spend some cash on memory so you 
can spend that memory on cache (sor- 
ry — couldn't resist). 

Thus far, I've explained caches as 
add-on software. But some hard disk- 
controller designers have gone a bit 
farther and actually have implement- 
ed small hardware caches right on the 
controller. The caches tend to be 
8K-32K in size. 

It sounds like a good idea, but it 
often isn't. The problem is that a 
cache that tiny doesn't do much. An 
8K cache makes a disk look really fast 
to the kind of small speed-test pro- 
grams that computer magazines run 
when writing reviews, but they don't 
help much for real-world applications. 
Further, built-in caches can con- 
fuse many disk-tester programs like 
SpinRite, Disk Technician, and the 
like. The cache makes them think the 
system is a good bit faster than it actu- 
ally is. The bottom line is this: If your 
controller has an on-board cachCj fine. 
But make sure you can disable the 
caching so you can reliably run a disk- 
mainlcnance program in the future. 

Sector Translation 

The last thing to look out for when 
shopping for a controller is sector 
translation. When hard disks first be- 
came popular in the PC world around 
1983, they used a disk-encoding meth- 
od called A'/FA/ (Modified Frequency 
Modulation, discussed in the next 
section). 

This slowly is being replaced bv 
RLL(Run Length Limited). RLL ' 
makes it easier to build large-capacity 
drives, and it, loo, is discussed in the 
next section. 

In 1986, when RLL first ap- 
peared on the PC scene, some PC pro- 
grams had trouble talking to RLL- 
type disk subsystems because they 
looked different from the MFM-type 
disk subsystems that the programs 
had been designed to expect. 



That's not a problem with today's 
software, but at the time, the makers 
of RLL disk controllers decided to 
solve the problem with sector 
translation. 

Sector translation makes a newer 
RLL disk subsystem look like an older 
MFM disk subsystem. Most translat- 
ing controllers give you the option to 
disable translation and *'come clean" 
about their RLL-ness. 

Why disable translation? Again, 
because ofSpinRite and the crowd. 
Disk-fixer and -maintenance pro- 
grams are greatly hampered in what 
they can do for your disk if the con- 
troller is translating. Make sure you've 
got the option to disable translation. 
You'll also sec translation on some of 
the 300MB and larger drives, as well 
as on many IDE drives, discussed in 
the next section. 

Interface Basics 

Up to now, you've seen the character- 
istics that a drive or a controller can 
have; these characteristics can be 
mixed and matched in just about any 
way. But the drive and controller have 
to agree on how to communicate; 
that's determined by their interface 
type and encoding scheme. 

How does the controller talk to 
the drive? Originally (before 1983), 
you'd buy a controller and a drive 
from the same company, so you 
wouldn't worrv' about the interface. 
Nowadays, it's likely that you'll want 
to buy a controller from one vendor, 
like Western Digital or Data Technol- 
ogy, and a drive from another vendor, 
like Seagate, Maxtor, or Mitsubishi. 
This implies that both the drive and 
controller must support some com- 
mon standard interface. 

Originally, the now-defunct Shu- 
gart Technologies used something it 
called the ST 506/412 interface, or as 
it's more commonly known, ST506. 
Most PC drives use ST506 to this day. 
It can support a maximum data-trans- 
fer rate of 7.5 million bits per second 
(Mbps). That doesn't sound slow, but 
it is, and that's one reason why it's 
slowly fading from the scene. The 
other reason is that it's noise prone. 

Real muscle drives these days are 
using a replacement interface called 
£"^^7 (Enhanced Small Device Inter- 
face). ESDI, like all other interfaces 
after the ST 5 06. reduces noise and 
boosts speed and reliability by putting 
part of the controller right on the 
drive. ESDI could theoretically sup- 
port 24 Mbps. The ESDI interface has 
another useful feature; the drive can 
describe itself to the controller, which 
makes drive setup easier. 

Another interface that high-end 
machines are using more and more 
goes by the unfortunate acronym 



COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



SCSI (pronounced scuzzy and stand- 
ing for Small Computer Systems In- 
terface). IBM's recent announcement 
of some PS/2 models with a SCSI in- 
terface and the U.S. government's re- 
cent gigantic purchase of SCSI- 
equipped PCs under its Desktop III 
contract will boost SCSI acceptance in 
the PC world. 

SCSI transfers data at up to 20 
megabits per second. Eventually SCSI 
will support over 100 megabits per 
second, but for now it's in the ESDI 
range of speed. Taking things a bit far- 
ther than ESDI, SCSI actually puts the 
whole controller on the drive — the 
board in the computer really doesn't 
have much to do and is, strictly speak- 
ing, not a controller but a host 
adapter. 

SCSIs are also neat because the 
interface lets you daisychain up to 
eight devices. That means theoretical- 
ly you could run a couple of SCSI 
hard disks, a CD-ROM player (which 
also uses SCSI), and a scanner all off a 
single host adapter. While SCSI is 
probably a better interface in the long 
run, ESDI is currently better suited to 
the DOS environment and probably 
the better bet for now. 

IDE (Integrated Drive Electron- 
ics) is basically a SCSI-like approach 
to ST506. The electronics can't handle 
SCSI speeds, and the interface reUes 
on ST 5 06 technology, but the control- 
ler is, again, located right on the drive, 
allowing greater transfer rates. The re- 
sulting stream of digital data is al- 
ready Preformatted for an IBM-type 
bus on a 40-pin connector, rather than 
using the more common two-cable ap- 
proach. Compaq uses IDE extensively 
in its systems. 

Sound good? It is, basically, with 
one twist: You can't maintain IDE 
with software. You're not supposed to 
low-level formal it, and in fact I've 
seen a low-level format damage a 
Compaq drive. The Norton Utilities 
will work for some data recovery, but, 
again, disk-fixer programs can't help 
you much because IDEs tend to be 
sector-translating systems. Further, 
there's not really a standard IDE in- 
terface. In fact, one data-recovery firm 
reports at least 25 different kinds of 
IDE. There's something a bit too dis- 
posable about these drives; they're ba- 
sically reliable, but you're helpless if 
they do develop a problem. IDE would 
be a very good idea if programs could 
reformat the drive and the IDE manu- 
facturers would agree on a standard. 
These things may be the case in a year 
or two. Right now, be careful. 

What About Hardcards? 

Several firms offer hardcards, which 
are controller boards with a slim drive 
mounted right on them. They don*t 



take up a drive bay, but they do lake 
up a slot. Some, in fact, are designed 
so badly that they take up three 
slots — look out for these! 

Hardcards are nice if you need a 
means to transport a lot of infor- 
mation, such as if you had to set up 20 
identical machines in a learning lab. 
You'll probably want to avoid them, 
however, since they tend to be IDE 
and many generate a fair amount of 
heat near your other circuit boards. 

The Great Encoding Debate 

Part of a disk-system designer's job is 
figuring out how best to pack data on 
a drive. That's called the disk's encod- 
ing scheme, and it's always a matter of 
compromise — more data in an area 
means less reliability- Most PC drive/ 
controller combinations prior to 1988 
used modified frequency modulation 
(MFM). 

Around 1986, a newer encoding 
scheme, run length limited (RLL — the 
idea was borrowed from mainframe 
drive design), started appearing on PC 
systems. It took any given drive and 
packed 50 percent more data on it — a 
drive that held 20MB when connected 
to an MFM controller could hold 
30MB when paired with an RLL 
controller. 

Obviously, the extra 50 percent 
doesn't come without cost. You can't 
just hook up an RLL controller to a 
drive that's been doing MFM, refor- 
mat, and instantly get more space. 
The drive has to be engineered better 
to be able to reliably store the more 
compact RLL format. That's why you 
see drives rated as either MFM or 
RLL quality. 

For example, the Seagate ST4096 
(an 80MB MFM drive) and the 
ST4144R (a 120MB RLL drive) are 
basically the same drive — 120MB is 
50 percent larger than 80MB. The 
4144R is just buih a bit better, and it 
costs a little more. The 4096 is $527 
discounted; the 4144R is $589 
discounted. 

RLL has unfairly gotten a bad 
name in some circles because some 
computer dealers in the late 1980s 
matched up MFM-quality drives with 
RLL controllers. The result was larg- 
er-capacity, unreliable drives and a le- 
gion of headaches for PC fix-it people. 

So when you're buying an RLL 
controller, buy an RLL-qualiiy drive. 
Or you could buy a little insurance by 
matching up an RLL-quality drive 
with an MFM controller. Consider 
this: The ST4096 is a good drive, 
but why not spend $60 more for 
the ST4144R and format it under j 
MFM as BOMB? After all, $589 
is still a reasonable price for an 
80MB drive, and you'd have 
an overengineered system 



that's very reliable. 

By the way, when people advertise 
MFM or RLL drives, they really mean 
MFM- or RLL^ncoded ST506. ESDI, 
SCSI, and IDE all encode with RLL. 

Recommendations 

Growing program sizes, download- 
able fonts, and graphics make drives 
of 80MB and larger a necessity. The 
Maxtor or Seagate 80MB drives are 
both good and widely discounted. If 
you buy a 40-megger now, you'll only 
save a little money over an 80, you'll 
end up buying a larger drive in a year 
or two, and you'll be giving up a voice 
coil for a band stepper. 

For an XT system, buy a 1:3 con- 
troller like the Western Digital (WD) 
XT-GEN or the Data Technology 
(DT) 51 50 CX; both are good, basic, 
inexpensive 8-bit MFM controllers 
that can support a wide variety of 
drives. For XT RLL, try the WD 
ia04-27X. Avoid the Seagate ST-1 IR 
XT RLL controller, as it has a pecu- 
liarity that limits data reconstruction 
and recovery possibilities, and, be- 
sides, it only supports Seagate drives. 

For an AT system, WD offers the 
1006V-MM2 MFM controller and the 
1006V-SR2 RLL controller. DT's 
7280 MFM controller is also quite 
trouble-free. All three are 1:1 control- 
lers, and each can be had for about 
$120. 

If you need something larger 
(over 120MB), you'll probably have to 
go ESDI. CDC Imprimus (now owned 
by Seagate) makes good drives, as do 
Maxtor and Micropolis. 

When buying computers, think 
twice about IDE drives. Again, IDE is 
a good idea, and you'll save a few 
bucks, but it robs you of a lot of disk- 
maintenance options. That means 
you should be careful about buying 
hardcards. 

Ensure that on-board cache and 
sector translation, if present, can be 
disabled to get the maximum benefit 
from disk-maintenance programs. B 
*Gidget, the dog on our title 
page, was treated fairly 
and humanely. 



/\<^' 
■^ 







PC DISK UPDATE 



JOYCE SIDES 



There's been some confusion about 
the difference between COM- 
PUTERS two disk products: our 
SharePak disk and COMPUTE's 
PC Disk The monthly SharePak disk 
is a thematic disk filled with two ta 
five shareware programs. You can or- 
der a single disk for $5.95 for the 5'/4- 
inch disk or $6.95 for the 3Vi-inch 
disk. Or you can subscribe to the 
monthly disk. 

The subscription rate per year for 
the SharePak is $59.95 for the 5'/4- 
inch disk and $64.95 for the 3V2-inch 
disk. To see a description of the pro- 
grams on the SharePak disk, look for 
the SharePak ad in COMPUTE. 

PC Disk is different. It appears 
every two months and is filled with at 
least five commercial-quality free or 
shareware programs with a focus on 
utility and productivity software. We 
search through hundreds of programs 
and pubhsh only the best. The PC 
Disk costs $9.95 for a single disk or 
$49.95 for a one-year subscription. 

The bimonthly "On Disk" col- 
umn in COMPt/TT describes the pro- 
grams and includes four screen shots 
to help you get a feel for each. 

The ''PC Disk Update" column 
covers reader tips and questions about 
the PC Disk. Questions concerning 
the SharePak should be sent to our 
customer service department at 324 
West Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, 
Greensboro, North Carolina 27408, or 
you may call (919) 275-9809. 

No Mouse Required 

Unlike almost every other paint pro- 
gram I've used (including Deluxe- 
Paint), TurboPaint (October 1990) 
doesn't require a mouse to run. If you 
try to load other paint programs with- 
out a mouse driver installed, you 
won't get very far. 

TurboPaint includes a keyboard 
driver that uses the cursor keys to 
move the mouse pointer. The 5 key 
acts as the left mouse button, and the 
Del key works as a substitute for the 
right mouse button. You have to press 
either key twice to get a complete 
mouse click. Pressing the 5 or Del key 



once tells TurboPaint that you're 
holding the button down. Use this 
when you want to drag the mouse 
pointer. Press the key the second time 
to release the button. 

Of course, using the keyboard 
isn't as flexible as using the mouse, 
but it gives users who don't own a 
mouse the chance to try the program. 




Starry-Eyed Tandys 

Star Blaster (December 1 990) may 
not work on your Tandy. If the pro- 
gram displays a message that it can't 
find your graphics card and you know 
that a graphics card is installed, call 
our customer service department at 
(919) 275-9809 or write to PC Disk 
Problems,' 324 West Wendover Ave- 
nue, Suite 200, Greensboro, North 
Carolina 27408. 

Be specific about the problem. 
Give the program name, the issue in 
which the program was published, the 
nature of the problem, and the disk 
size you require. A disk will be sent to 
you with a version of Star Blaster that 
works on Tandy computers. We're 
sorry for any inconvenience this prob- 
lem has caused our Tandy readers. 



Mousing with Screen Saver 

If you've had trouble installing the 
mouse option (or Screen Saver (De- 
cember 1990), here's how you do it. 
First, install Screen Saver using the 
SCSAVINS.EXE installation pro- 
gram. Choose option 8, Ignore mouse 
movement, and make sure the option 
is set to No. Save your changes and re- 
boot the computer. 

Install your mouse driver. Now 
run Screen Saver by entering 
SCSAVER ON at the DOS prompt. 
The install message should say Mouse 
support enabled. 

To test the installation, run a pro- 
gram that uses a mouse. Wait for the 
timing interval to pass. When the 
screen blanks, press a mouse button. 
Please note that this option only 
works in programs that use a mouse. 

DlSKTRAK'Won 

If you get the message Advanced fea- 
ture not available . . . when you run 
DISKTRAK (December 1990), you're 
probably using a version of DOS 
earlier than DOS 3.0. 

The author, Birk Binnard, ad- 
vised me that he had updated the pro- 
gram since it was published in 
COMPUTE, The updated version still 
doesn't run under early versions of 
DOS, but it has a few bug fixes and 
added features such as path support 
for data files, a Restore function, and 
printer controls for printing reports. 

The newest version is DISK- 
TRAK 5.10, which you can get by 
downloading the program from 
CompuServe. It's located in area 6 of 
the IBM Utilities Forum. 

If you don't have a modem or a 
CompuServe account, you can send a 
formatted disk plus $0.50 for postage 
in a reusable disk mailer to the ad- 
dress below. If you'd like to register 
the program, send a check for $1 5.00, 
or if you've already registered, send 
$5.00 to cover the cost of the disk, 
disk mailer, and postage to Peninsula 
Software, 28510 Blythewood Drive, 
Palos Verdes, California 90274. Make 
sure you include information about 
the size disk vou need. E 



66 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




TIPS & TOOLS 



JOYCE SIDES 



Y 



ou can't nest FOR loops in 
batch files, as useftil as this might 
be. A Hne entered in a batch file 
like the following won't work: 



FOR %%t IN (C: \TP6 D: \TP) DO 
FOR %%p IN (*.PAS) DO DIR 
%%t %%p 

Try it, and DOS will inform you 
curtly that FOR loops can't be nest- 
ed. So what can you do when you 
want one command to apply to sev- 
eral disks or directories? You can 
fake it by employing COMMAND/C 
(So you'ihought DOS 3,3 made 
COMMAND/C obsolete?) 

The following is a liny batch file I 
use to copy all my Pascal files from 
my D drive for Turbo Pascal version 
5, and my C drive with the experi- 
mental version 6 files, all to a high- 
capacity disk in drive A. 

FOR %% A IN (D: \ TP C: \ TP6) 

DO COMMAND/C FOR %%B 

IN (%%A \*.PAS) DO copy 

iA: 



This horrifyingly convoluted program 
shows the best and the worst of the 
batch-file language. The best because 
it can do the job we want it to. The 
worst because doing it's unaesthetic! 

The %%A stands in for the 
D: \ TP directory and then the 
C: \TP6 directory. The FOR follow- 
ing the COMMAND/C is executed 
once for each directory in that first set 
of parentheses; there could be other 
directories listed as long as the entire 
line didn't exceed 128 characters. The 
COMMAND/C executes another 
copy ofCOMMAND.COM, so the 
second FOR statement has no idea 
that it's being executed from within 
another FOR statement. 

Tom Campbell 
Irvine, CA 

Windows 3.0 Switch-a-roo 

The colorful icon of a Windows 3.0 
application is probably the first thing 
a new Windows user notices. And it's 
neat that once a Windows application 



is installed in Program Manager, the 
icon for that program is automatically 
placed in the active window. 

But did you know that many 
Windows programs give you a choice 
of icons? You can change the Win- 
dows 3.0 icons with a few mouse 
clicks. For example, Core/ Draw and 
Crosstalk for Windows come 
equipped with two optional icons — 
the default icon that most of us use 
and a second icon that's there, if you 
know how to get to it. 

In Program Manager, locate the 




program that you'd like to check for 
alternate icons, Corel Draw, in my ex- 
ample. Click on the program once 
(don't run the program). 

In Program Manager's menu, se- 
lect the File menu and then the Prop- 
erties option. You1I see the window 
Program Item Properties. Click on the 
Change Icon button. 

When the Select Icon window ap- 
pears, click on the View Next button, 
and cycle through the icons that the 
program contains. Not every Win- 
dows application has multiple icons. 
For instance, Micrografx Designer 
only has one icon, but Core! Draw, 



Tetris, and Crosstalk for Windows 
have two icons each. Experiment with 
your Windows programs to find 
which ones have extra icons. 

Mark Minasi 
Arlington, VA 

Tipped Off 

Arc you thinking of turning that extra 
junk room into a computer room or 
an ofTice? You may find that there 
isn't enough desk space for your CPU 
unit, monitor, keyboard, mouse pad, 
and so on among all the other para- 
phernalia in the room. 

You could solve the space prob- 
lem by turning your desktop com- 
puter into a tower unit. Of course, to 
do this, you should have enough room 
on the floor to place the unit. You 
should also make sure the system will 
get enough ventilation. It shouldn't be 
squeezed into a place where the fan 
can't circulate the air to cool the unit. 

First, go to a computer accessory 
store and buy a stand specifically for 
converting units into tower systems. 
Then back up your hard drive (just in 
case), and install the unit in the stand. 

Some computer dealers advise re- 
formatting a hard drive once a desk- 
top system has been installed as a 
tower unit. There could be a problem 
with misalignment of the read/write 
heads which might render the data on 
the disk unreadable (hence the reason 
for backing up your hard drive first). 
Reformatting the disk corrects any po- 
tential problems. 

You don't have to perform a de- 
structive format. You can do a low- 
level format that serves the same 
purpose as a complete format for 
aligning the disk drive heads, and it 
doesn't destroy the data on the disk. 
Use a program such as Gibson Re- 
search's SpinRitell to make sure the 
job is done right. 

Peier Michaels 
San Francisco, CA 

Speed Up dBase 

If your dBase databases are growing 
large, vou can speed up processing bv 
using the SET ODOMETER com- 



M A y 19 9 1 



COMPUTE 



67 




TIPS & TOOLS 



mand When you use commands such 
as COPY, JOIN, COUNT, or SUM, 
dBase keeps you posted on its pro- 
gress by posting a running counter, or 
odometer, on the screen as it moves 
through the records. 

This slows processing because 
dBQse\i2kS to refresh the screen after 
processing each record. If you use the 
command SET ODOMETER TO 10, 
or SET ODOMETER TO 100, the 
screen will be updated ever>' 10 or 100 
records. On large databases, this saves 
significant amounts of time, yet it still 
provides you with a progress report so 
you know dBase is still working, 

SET ODOMETER TO is simi- 
lar to SET TALK OFF in that dBase 
does not report on its progress 
through the database. But unlike SET 
TALK OFF, SET ODOMETER TO 
provides a count of the records pro- 
cessed when the task has completed, 
Tony Roberts 
Greensboro, NC 

Cache the Wave 

The most demanding mechanical ac- 
tivities for a drive are starting up in 
the morning and moving the head 
throughout the day. You can relieve 
the first problem by leaving your ma- 
chine on all the time and avoid the 
second with a cache program, A disk 
cache minimizes the number of 
movements that the read/write heads 
in your disk drive must perform. In 
the process, it also helps speed up the 
system's activities. 

Disk caches transfer data from 
memory to memory, which is much 
faster than disk-to-memory transfers. 
Disk drives respond to read and write 
requests hundreds of thousands of 
times more slowly than RAM memo- 
ry responds to read and write re- 
quests. Disk caches let your system 
use the disk less and RAM more. 

Part of COMMAND.COM is re- 
read after you exit any large program. 
This means disk access. If youVe ever 
noticed a quick flash of the hard disk 
light when you exit a program, youVe 
seen the C0MMAND.COM reload. 
Rather than firing up the disk drive 
and moving the head to reread COM- 
MAND.COM, a disk cache files a 
copy of COMMAND,COM in memo- 
ry and reads the file from the copy in- 
stead of from the COMMAND.COM 
disk file. 

That's the idea of a cache. It's a 



memory-resident program that watch- 
es disk reads and writes and makes 
copies of disk activity in a section of 
memory (usually extended or expand- 
ed memory, since a cache of one to 
two megabytes is preferable). 

Disk caches relieve your disk 
drive of work, and this might save on 
disk repairs, 

SMARTDRV.SYS, shipped with 
MS-DOS and Windows, is a simple 
cache program that does the job. My 
favorite cache, however, is Multisoft's 
SUPER FOKWIK cache, which costs 
less than $100. To get a copy of SU- 
PER POKWIK call Multisoft at 
(503) 644-5644. 

Mark Minasi 
Arlington, VA 

Time Out 

If the clock in your PC occasionally 
forgets the time, the battery might 
need to be replaced. Then again, it 
might not. The problem may be 
caused by the games you're playing. 

Jack Nicklaiis* Greatest Holes of 
Golf is one example. My Northgate 
AT for]gets what time it is when I play 
the game. The clock stops during 
gameplay; however, it starts up again 
as soon as the game is over, I handle 
this problem by running the game as a 
menu choice, from a batch file run- 
ning \xndcT Automenu, You can run 
the batch file from the DOS prompt if 
you're not using a menuing system. 



CD\GAMES\JACKN 

GOLFE 

C: 

TIME 

MENU 

The batch file is called NICK, 
BAT, and you should enter the com- 
mand NICK to run the batch file. You 
should also include the correct drive 
IDs and subdirectory names to fit 
your system. 

James Condon 
Gloversville, NY 

Exporting Data the Easy Way 

Almost everyone knows how to use 
OPEN and PRINT# in QuickBASIC 
But you might not know that there's 
an embarrassingly simple way to cre- 
ate comma-delimited ASCII files. Just 
about every database program and 
spreadsheet in the world can import 



ASCII files. It's the universal format. 

The WRITE # statement is a 
quick back door to the most popular 
data-management programs in the 
world, from Lotus 1-2-3 to dBase to 
Quattro Pro. 

Try running this program; it asks 
you for information similar to what 
you might put in a customer list. To 
stop it, simply press Enter instead of 
typing in the last name, 

OPEN "DATA.TXT" FOR 

OUTPUT AS #1 
DO 
LINE INPUT "Name: **; 

NAME$ 
IF Names = ** '' THEN EXIT 

DO 
LINE INPUT "Address: "; 

ADDRESSS 
LINE INPUT **City: "; CITY$ 
LINE INPUT "State: "; 

STATES 
LINE INPUT "ZIP: '\ ZIP$ 
WRITE #1, NAMES, ADDRESSS, 

CITYS,STATES,ZIP$ 
LOOP 
CLOSE #1 

The output looks something like this: 

"Tom CampbeU*',"8 Hazelnut", 

"Irvine'\"CA",*^2714" 
"John Seagull","! McCartney 

Ave.","Holl>iiood", 

"CA",'*97114" 

Note that all the data, numeric or not, 

is surrounded by quotation marks 
when written to the file with WRITE 
#. Items separated by semicolons in 
the WRITE # statement are separated 
by commas in the record. Each record 
ends with a carriage return or linefeed. 
The most difficult thing to remember 
about using WRITE # is never, under 
any circumstances, to let anyone know 
how easy this feature was to program. 
Tom Campbell 
Irvine, CA 

If you have an i merest ing tip that you 
think would help other PC users, send 
it along with your name, address, and 
Social Security number to COM- 
PUTES Tips & Tools, 324 West Wen- 
dover Av'enue, Suite 200, Greensboro, 
North Carolina 27408. For each tip we 
publish, well pay you $2 5-$ 50 and 
send you a COMPUTERS PC LCD 
clock radio while supplies last. B 



68 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




D 



ROGRAMMING POWER 



TOM CAMPBELL 



Computer files come in different 
flavors. Some have a predictable 
structure — like text files or files 
of fixed'length records — but 
most are unpredictable. This month 
we'll learn how to read files with an 
unknown composition (notably 
COM, EXE, and OBJ files), and we'll 
see how to pick out the text strings 
hiding inside. 

But before we begin, let's step 
back and look at what files actually 
are. A file is anything stored on disk. 
This includes what you normally 
think of as data files, such as the WK2 
files from a spreadsheet, DOC files 
from a word processor, or DBF files 
from a database. But it also includes 
DOS, contained in hidden files on 
your boot disk; C0MMAND.COM, 
your command line interpreter; and 
programs like DBASE, EXE, 
WP.EXE, and XCOPY.EXE. 

If s no accident that DOS stands 
for Disk Operating System. Many 
people become confused when they 
discover that the operating system it- 
self is usually nothing more than a 
file. But because they are files, DOS 
and executable programs can be read 
like any other data files. 

That's why this month's pro- 
gram, SNOOP, can read through any 
kind of file looking for messages in 
ASCII text format. To use SNOOP, 
just enter SNOOP and a filename at 
the command line. Any messages the 
file contains will be written on the 
screen. Try entering these commands 
(supplying your system's path to each 
file): 

SNOOPQB.EXE 

SNOOP COMMAND.COM 

SNOOP MODE.COM 

Many have claimed that MS- 
DOS is arbitrary, illogical, and diffi- 
cult to learn; and that may be true of 
some of its aspects. But file handling 
is one of the exceptions. To appreciate 
how logically DOS handles files, con- 
sider the peculiar foibles of the early 
Macintosh operating system. 

Apple tried to avoid the term///e 



when the Macintosh was introduced. 
Instead, programs (executable files) 
were called applications, and the 
files they created were known as 
documents. 

It was a noble but misguided 
idea. Applying the term document to a 
200-layer CAD drawing or a database 
containing 10,000 employees didn't 
make the notion of files more con- 
crete but only added another confus- 
ing level of abstraction. 




In short, a file is anything stored 
on disk, and the steps you take in 
using a disk file are analogous to the 
steps you would take with a manila 
folder. You must 

1 . Open the file. 

2. Use the file (read it or write to it). 

3. Close the file. 

You deal with Manila folders the 
same way. You can't take anything out 
of a file before you open it, and you'll 
run into problems if you don't close 
the file and put it away when you're 
finished. 

The next larger unit of the operat- 
ing system is the subdirectory, roughly 
equivalent to a filing cabinet. DOS's 



earliest version left out subdirectories, 
and even after a tree subdirectory sys- 
tem was featured, many programs 
were unable to make use of it. 

In QuickBASIC, a formal syntax 
chart of the OPEN command looks 
scary: 

OPEN @file$ [FOR mode] [ACCESS 

access] [lock] AS [#lfilenumber% 
[LEN=reclen%] 

Indeed, the options are almost 
overwhelming, but we'll pay attention 
only to the configuration of this 
month's OPEN statements. The first 
courtesy owed a user by a program 
that uses existing files (as opposed to 
one that creates files) is to ensure that 
the requested file exists and to display 
a suitable error message if it doesn't. 

QuickBASIC like Turbo Pascal, 
doesn't have a particularly attractive 
means of doing that. You have to lie 
in wait with ON ERROR, open a file 
for sequential access (that is, as if it 
were a text file), input only, and wait 
for runtime error 53, which will occur 
when a file with that name doesn't ex- 
ist. I couldn't find runtime errors 
(which is what ON ERROR traps) 
listed in the Qw/c/c^^5/C documenta- 
tion, so this information comes to you 
by way of experimentation. Other 
modes, such as BINARY and RAN- 
DOM, create a file if the file doesn't 
already exist. Then you must close the 
file and start your program — in this 
case, by immediately reopening the 
file in binary mode. 

The first OPEN in the program, 
the dummy one whose only purpose 
in Hfe is to see if the requested file is 
available, looks like this: 

OPEN COMMANDS FOR INPUT 
AS #1 ' Make sure the file exists. 

This means Open the file named on 

the command line for sequential ac- 
cess, and use file descriptor number L 
Note that the word sequential doesn't 
appear anywhere. This is because of 
the history of file management. 
BASIC originally could open only text 




D 



ROGRAMMING POWER 



files, and other modes were tacked 
onto the syntax later. File handling is 
one of the features that seem to be 
completely different on each imple- 
mentation of BASIC on minis and 
mainframes and among dialects in 
those environments. 

As mentioned, opening a nonex- 
istent file triggers a branch to the 
user's error-handling routine at run- 
time; this month's ON ERROR has a 
hard-coded check for error 53 because 
that's ^lickBASIC's internal error 
code for File not found. If the file ex- 
ists, execution continues. We close the 
file immediately (because it's been 
opened in the wrong mode) and re- 
open it in the next statement: 

OPEN COMMANDS FOR 
BINARY AS #1 

Binary access means the file is 
treated as a row of bytes on the disk, 
which the program is responsible for 
managing. In a text file, INPUT # 
searches for delimiters such as car- 
riage returns instead of reading a cer- 
tain number of bytes. So if you 
wanted to look for text strings in a file 
such as C0MMAND.COM or 
WREXE, all kinds of nasty errors 
could happen because you have no 
guarantee that a delimiter will appear 
anywhere in a nontext file. 

The best way to deal with a file of 
bytes is to create a data type that con- 
tains only one byte. You could use 
TYPE, but the easiest alternative here 
is to create an anonymous data type 
and immediately allocate space for it, 
a trick that C has had for years, Pascal 
still doesn't have, and QuickBASIC 
has acquired recently. 

DIM NextByte AS STRING * 1 

This statement creates a variable 
called NextByte that holds just one 
byte of data. We retrieve a byte from 
the input file this way: 

GET #1, , NextByte: * Get the next 
' character from the input file. 

The empty parameter betwen # I and 
NextByte is the record-length parame- 
ter used in RANDOM mode. It's not 
necessary here, but it must be retained 
as a placeholder. In the program the 
GET statement is placed in a normal 
WHILE NOT EOF/WEND loop. B 



' SNOOP. BAS -- Finds mes&ages in a file. 

' Forroat: snoo? (d : Hpath] f llena.nie[ ,extl 

' Forward declarations--chese routines are used in the prooram 

DECLARE SUB HandleError (J 

DECLARE FUNCTION IS Alpha i (KexcBytoSt 

DECLARE FUNCTION IsPrintl (K©xtByte$} 

DECLARir SUB Paufia () 

ON ERROR GOTO HandleError 

' This creates a data type with no name. It letc us read one byte 

• at & time Irom the file, 

DIM NextByte AS STRING * 1 

coubt MinStr = 5 ' Minimum » of printable characters that form a word, 

CONST True = -i. False = NOT True * Constants for clarity. 

DEFIKT h-Z ' All variables are integers unless a suffix character is used. 

NextSyteASC =0 ■ Do a CHR on this only once, to speed things up. 

Position = " Tracks byte offset Into the file, 

Strsi^e =0 ' # of chars in printable string so far. 

Words = ■' ■ Initialise the word collect so far. 

OPEN COHMAND$ FOR INPUT AS *1 < Make sure the file exists. 
CLOSE 1 < It does. Close It. 

' READ necessary because RANDOM mode defaults to read-write. 
OPEN COMMANDS FOR BINARY AS «1 
PRINT ■ Processing file ■; COMMANDS 
PRINT "Press (Esc} to quit or {Space} to pause.* 
PRINT 

WHILE NOT EOF(l) * Continue until file 1. the input, has been read through 
GET #1, . NextByte: ' Get the next character Crop the input file. 
Pause ' The user may pause output or quit now. 

NextByteASC = ASC (NextBytal 

' If it's extended ASCII, reset the string and exit the loop. 
IF NextByteASC AND 123 THEH 

Strsize = 
ELSE 

■ If it's an end-of 'String character, 

IF (NextByte = CHRS113U OH [NextByte = CHRStOl] OR (KaxtBvte = *S') THEN 
• and the accutmlated string is long enough, 
IF StrSiie >= MinStr THEN 

• success! Print the string I 
PRINT Words 

' And start back at square one by reinitializing state variables. 

StrSize = Oi Words = " 
ELSE 

■ EOS found, but string was too short. Reset state variables. 

StrSlie = 0: WordS = " 
END IF • StrSize >= MinStr 
ELSE 

' Not an EOS characi:er. See if it's printable. 
' If there's no string yet, 
IF StrSize = THEN 

' and if this is a letter, 

IF IsAlpha(NextByteS) THEN 

' than assume the first letter of a valid string has been found. 
StrSize s ir Word$ = NextByte 

END IF " IsAlpha 
ELSE 

• This isn't the first letter of the word. 
IF IsPrint%(NextByteS3 THEN 

' Another printable char has been found, so add it to the 
' uninterrupted string of printable chars. 
StrSize = Strsize + i: WordS = Words + NextByte 
ELSE 

' A string of printable chars has been interrupted by an 
' unprintable char. This makes the whole string invalid, 
' and we must start back at square one. 
StrSize = 0: Words n •• 
END IP 
END IF • IF Strsize = 
END IF ' IF NextByte = Chr$ll3» 
END IF ' IF NextByteASC AND 128 
WEND 

CLOSE #1 * Return the file's resources to COS. 
mfD 

' Display this if a runtime error occurs. 
HandleError: 

IF ERR = 53 THEN ' Handle thfi most coOTtion caao. 
PRINT "FllA "; COMMANDS; " doesn't exist.' 

ELSE 

PRINT 'Runtime error #'; ERR 

END IF 
END 

DEFSNG A-2 

FUNCTION rsAlpha (NextByteS) 
SELECT CASE NextByteS 
CASE "A* TO 'Z' 

IsAlpha = True 
CASE "a" TO *z" 

IsAlpha = True 
CASE ELSE 

IsAlpha ^ False 
END SELECT 
END FUNCTION 

FUNCTION IsPrint* (NextByteS) 
SELECT CASE NextByte? 
CASE ■ • TO ■}' 

IsPrintt n True 
CASE ELSE 

IsFrintt = False 
END SELECT 
END FUNCTION 

SUB Pause 

GetKeyS = INKERS 
IP GetKeyS = CHRSf27S THEN 
PRINT 'Interrupted' 
CLOSE 1 
END 
ELSE 

IF G^tKeyS - ' ' THEN 
PRINT ■Pausing..." 
DO 

LOOP WHILE INKEY$ = " 
PRINT 'Continuing' 
END IF 
END IF 
END SUB 



Returns True if the character NextByteS 

is a letter. 

If it's In the range of uppercase letters, 

return a nontero value. 

If It's in the range of lowercase 

letters, return a nonzero value (True} . 

If it's net in the prescribed range, 

the function call fails. 



Returns a nonzero value (Truel if the 
character NextByteS is printable. 
Printable means not a control character 
or not an extended ASCII character. 
If ifs not printable, return a zero 
value (False} . 



Check for a keystroke. If it's the space 

bar, wait for another keystroke. If it's 

the {Esc} key, exit the program. 

(Esc) has been pressed, say so. 

Return file resources to DOS. 

Return to DOS. 

(Space} was pressed. 

If any other key, ignore. 

Print status message. 

Wait Cor any other keystroke. 

This returns to DOS if a key hasn't been 

pressed. Continues here when a key has 

been pressed. 




POINT & CLICK 



CLIFTON KARNES 



H hat's the hottest programming 
tool to hit the PC since the 
original Turbo Pascal? ^ilh- 
oul a doubt, it's Asymetrix's 
ToolBook for Windows (Asymetrix, 
1 10 1 1 0th Avenue NE, Suite 7 1 7, 
Bellevue, Washington 98004; 206- 
462-0501; $395). 

Like Windows itself, ToolBook is 
an object-oriented, event-driven envi- 
ronment. This means that a program 
waits for events from the user and 
takes action based on the nature of 
these events. The user is in control, 
and the program is passive. 

In ToolBook this environment 
has two main elements: graphics ob- 
jects and object handlers. Almost 
everything you see on the screen is an 
object, and a program communicates 
with these objects by sending mes- 
sages to them whenever an event in- 
volving the object occurs. Objects, in 
turn, act on these events by executing 
handlers written in ToolBook's Open- 
Script programming language. 

As an example, let's look at the 
familiar OK button. This button is an 
object, and when you click on it, this 
event causes the operating environ- 
ment to send a message to the button 
telling it that it has been clicked. If 
you want to do something when this 
event occurs, you attach a message 
handler to the button. In the case of 
an OK button, the message handler 
might dismiss a dialog box. 

That's the essence of ToolBook 
programming — objects and handlers, 
interacting by way of event-caused 
messages. ToolBook takes care of no- 
tifying you of events and sending mes- 
sages. You have to create the objects 
for these events and attach handlers. 

Creating objects using Tool- 
Book's design tools is a pleasure. The 
program offers a high-quality set of 
object-based drawing tools, including 
Bezier curves, which rival those 
found in many dedicated drawing 
programs. Add to that support for 
millions of colors, most in dithered 
patterns, and you have an interface 
construction set that most program- 
mers only dream about. 



To help with interface design, 
ToolBook offers two basic groups of 
predefined objects: buttons and fields. 
(A third type of object, a hotword, is 
really a special type of button whose 
object is a word.) 

Standard buttons come in a vari- 
ety of types including push buttons, 
radio buttons, and check-box buttons. 
Styles are rectangular, rounded- 
corners, shadowed, and transparent. 



TOOLBOOK 
PROVES 




Fields are used to display text or 
other objects and have as much flexi- 
bility as buttons. You can have scroll- 
ing, bordered, transparent, and record 
fields; record fields are just one ex- 
ample of ToolBook's special support 
for database construction. 

If these objects aren't enough, 
you can create your own, and you can 
combine any number of objects into a 
group. And all objects can be moved, 
resized, and recolored at any time. 

Behind the objects that make up 
a Toolbook program's interface are 
handlers written in OpenScript. As a 
programming language, it is complete, 
powerful, and very English-like. You 
can do almost anything in it that you 
can do in C or Pascal, but since Open- 
Script is interpreted, it can be slower. 



As far as large-scale organization 
goes, ToolBook was inspired, at least 
in part, by the Macintosh-based 
HyperCard md its HyperTalk pro- 
gramming language. ToolBook uses a 
book metaphor in much the same way 
that HyperCard uses the stack. 

Programs in ToolBook consist of 
one or more pages in a book. A page, 
like a book itself, is an object and can 
be used to represent almost any- 
thing — a record in a database, the 
main window of a word processor, a 
dialog box, or a page of text in a 
hyperlinked document. 

ToolBook is so powerful and 
deep that it's hard to describe. I've 
been working with it for months, and 
I don't feel like I've really tapped its 
full potential. My only complaint with 
ToolBook is its speed. Although it 
does some things extremely fast — like 
putting graphics on the screen and 
sorting — no program can ever be too 
fast or too small. With careful design 
and coding, however, a ToolBook pro- 
gram can be made fairly speedy. 

If you decide to lake the Tool- 
Book plunge, there are two additional 
packages you should know about. The 
first is Asymetrix's Author's Resource 
KiU or ARK {%A5^). ARK is intended 
for developers, and although it comes 
with a very useful utility, BookLook, 
its big draw is its license to distribute 
the ToolBook runtime. If you plan to 
market your ToolBook applications, 
you'll need ARK 

The second package is R-Spy 
(Syndetic Management Systems, 
15530 SE 1 84th Street, Renton, Wash- 
ington 98058; 206-228-4026; $125). R- 
Spy is a programmer's utility that 
gives you instant access to any Tool- 
Book script or object. With R-Spy 
you can simply click the right mouse 
button on any ToolBook object (this 
hot click can be redefined), and you'll 
see a dialog box that lets you edit the 
script of the target, the book, the cur- 
rent page, or the page's background. 
You can also change the target and 
edit or view its properties. If you're se- 
rious about programming in Tool- 
Book R'Spy is essential. Q 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 71 




ot long ago, the word laser 
brought to mind sophisticated 
weaponry, radio transmissions 
bouncing off the moon, micro- 
surgery, and other futuristic images. 
Who would Ve thought that by 1990 
Hterally millions of people would have 
laser devices sitting on their desks? 

Like every other facet of the com- 
puter world, printing has evolved sub- 
stantially. We used to be amazed at 



the speed of daisywheel printers. They 
were little more than computer-driven 
typewriters, but at speeds ranging 
around 200 words per minute (with 
no errors), they left human typists in 
the dust 

Dot-matrix printers seemed won- 
derful devices— they printed fast and 
were capable of producing graphics. 
Later, near-letter-quality (NLQ) print- 
ing allowed dot-matrix printers to be 
used for important business letters. 
NLQ involved nothing more than 
leaching the printer to put more ink in 
a smaller space, or increasing the reso- 



lution — the dots per inch (dpi). 

Increasing print quality slowed a 
dot-matrix printer significantly, how- 
ever — often to half its draft-mode 
speed. Printer technology had come a 
long way, but it was far from perfect. 
It wasn't until laser printers hit the 
market that computer hardcopy out- 
put reached exceptional quality. 

Laser Technology 

Laser printers use a technology simi- 
lar to that of copy machines: The pa- 
per is electrically charged as it passes 
through the device so that a fme black 
powder called toner will leap from a 
device known as a printer drum to the 
paper in the desired patterns. The dif- 
ference is in the way the image is elec- 
tronically etched on the printer drum. 



V\f 



I 



lam Ha 










\ 



m 



W^ 




Copiers generally feed the image of 
the page being copied to the printer 
drum through simple optics. Laser 
printers use a laser beam to transmit a 
page in computer memory to the drxmi. 

A big difference between laser 
printers and other printing devices is 
that the entire page is programmed, or 
rasterized, in memory before the pa- 
per begins its journey through the 
printer. Dot-matrix and impact print- 
ers, on the other hand, program as 
they print, printing a little of the page 
at a lime. 

The benefits of laser printers are 
many, one of the most important be- 
ing speed. In draft mode, a good 24- 
pin dot-matrix will print at some- 
where between 300 and 400 characters 
per second (cps), and considerably 
slower if it's in NLQ mode. Laser 
printer speed is measured, instead, by 
pages per minute (ppm). Many of to- 
day's laser printers will churn out 
eight ppm, and a few will do ten. Soon 
we'll see these desktop laser printer 
speeds double. On a basis of 300 
words per page averaging five charac- 
ters per word at eight ppm, a laser 
printer will approach 200 cps — about 
the speed of a dot-matrix printer — 
and all of it letter quality. 




Another advantage of laser tech- 
nology is sound — or, rather, the lack 
of it. Dot-matrix and impact printers 
are annoyingly noisy. If you have sev- 
eral printers going at once, conversa- 
tion is almost impossible, to say 
nothing of phone calls. All you hear 
from a laser printer is its fan and, 
when printing, the low hum of the 
printer engine as it carries the paper 
through. 

The most significant difference 
between laser and other printers is the 
resolution of the output. The higher 
the resolution, the cleaner the output. 
Most of today's laser printers print at 
300 dpi, though there are several high- 
er-resolution devices on the market, 
some of them printing as high as 1000 
dpi. Most dot-matrix printers produce 
somewhere around 75 dpi. Laser 
printers have allowed computer out- 
put to move into the realm of 
typesetting. 

Belter resolution means better 
text and graphics — much better text 
and graphics. Depending on the in- 
structions from the software driving 
the printer, graphic Hnes are smooth, 
gray shading is evenly dispersed, and 
text (especially in larger fonts) doesn't 
have that blocky, stairstep appearance 
associated with computer output. 

A Question of Character 

It's difficult to talk about laser print- 
ers without using some fairly technical 
typesetting terms like typeface, point 
size, and so on. Let's pause here a mo- 
ment for a few definitions. 



A typeface, such as Courier, is a 
family of fonts. Typefaces usually in- 
clude four fonts: normal, italic, bold, 
and bold italic. Fonts come in point 
sizes (abbreviated as pts — there are 72 
points per inch) from 2 points on up. 
Therefore, you would be able to visu- 
alize a 12-point italic Courier as being 
like the output from a standard type- 
writer, 1/6-inch high, and slightly 
oblique. 

Another pair of terms used in de- 
fining fonts are proportional and fixed 
spacing (or monospacing). Fixed- 
space fonts — if you are currently using 
a dot-matrix or impact printer— are 
probably what you're used to. Courier 
is a fixed-space font. The individual 
characters in Courier occupy the same 
amount of space on a line. An / is giv- 
en the same amount of space as a G, 
for example. 

Proportional fonts apportion line 
space to each character according to 
its width, and pairs of characters are 
kerned, which means that they're 
spaced in relationship to each other to 
give them a more pleasing appear- 
ance. For example, a capital T and a 
lowercase o can be squeezed closer to- 
gether than their individual widths be- 
cause the o can be moved slightly 
underneath the crossbar of the T. 

Inside Story 

Not only laser printers, but all print- 
ers, including typewriters, come with 
fonts built in. These are called resident 
fonts. Typewriters and impact printers 
have wheels or balls you can snap in 
and out to change type styles. An ad- 
vantage of laser printers is their ability 
to accept hundreds of different fonts 
in all kinds of point sizes. 

There are a number of methods 
to get fonts into a laser printer; the 
two most common ways are by using 
soft fonts and cartridges. 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 73 



Soft fonts are software that is sent 
to the printer from your computer 
through a process called downloading, 
which is a common term for sending 
data from one device to another. 
Fonts can be downloaded into a print- 
er's memory as needed for a specific 
print job (called temporary^ soft fonts), 
or they can be downloaded and kept 
in the printer's memor>' until the 
printer is shut off (called permanent 
soflfonts). 

Although there are two different 
downloading techniques, that doesn't 
mean that you need two different 
kinds of fonts. All soft fonts are capa- 
ble of being either temporary or per- 
manent. The downloading technique 
is usually determined by the word 
processor or desktop publishing 
software. 

Cartridge fonts come in car- 
tridges that plug into special slots in 
the laser printer. Once the cartridge is 
plugged in and activated, the fonts in 
the cartridge become resident. There 
are Hterally hundreds of different font 
cartridges available, with a multitude 
of font combinations. The major 
drawback to most of ihem is that, 
unlike soft fonts, you are usually 
locked into a limited selection of 
fonts and point sizes. But cartridges 
are much easier to install and use 
than soft fonts. 




High-resolution output tike this is 
standard with 1250'dpi typesetters. 
The same graphic could be printed on 
a laser printer, with significant degra- 
dation in smoothness, (Graphic used 
with permission from Dynamic 
Graphics, Peoria, Illinois.) 



PCL Has tKe Lion's Share 
of Laser Printer Sales 



97,0CX) User Printers 

with Other Languages in 1989 

67,000 Laser Printers 

with Other Languages in 1988 



175,000 PostScript 
Printers in 1989 



155,000 PostScript 
Printers in 1988 




1,048,000 PCL 
Printers in 1989 



675,000 PCL 
Printers in 1988 



L 



jiales for 1 990 unavailable 
Staiisiics provided by Daiaquest 



The Great Language Debate 

A laser printer uses a page-description 
language (PDL) to determine where to 
put toner on paper. Although there are 
several PDLs out there, two are at the 
forefront: Adobe Systems' PostScript 
and Hewlett-Packard's Printer Con- 
trol Language (PCL). Which language 
is better? The best answer is that it de- 
pends on your application. 

Among other major differences 
between the two types of printers is 
price. A PostScript printer can cost 
thousands more than a PCL printer; 
however, the prices of both kinds of 
printers have dropped considerably 
over the past year, making the deci- 
sion to go with PostScript less 
onerous. 

PostScript printers are the de- 
vices of choice for most high-end 
desktop pubHshers. The reasons are 
many. In several ways, PostScript is a 
more flexible language than PCL. 

PCL printers use a convention 
for printing fonts called bitmap. Bit- 
map fonts are produced as patterns of 
dots that are fixed in position like the 
elements of a rubber stamp. Every 
character must have its own bitmap. 

PostScript fonts, on the other 
hand, are drawn based on instructions 
that reside in memory or are down- 
loaded from your computer Fonts 
created from instructions rather than 
from bitmaps are called outline fonts. 
Since each character is drawn sepa- 
rately, it's easy to manipulate, stretch, 
or treat text with any number of other 
special effects, such as reversing (mir- 
roring), skewing, outlining, and so on. 



PostScript fonts can be rotated to any 
degree or printed with different fills. 
The only limitation is your imagination. 

Another font advantage of Post- 
Script is that most devices using this 
language come with 35 scalable fonts, 
meaning that all 35 can be sized in in- 
crements of 0.5 points, from 2 points 
to more than 700 points (depending 
primarily on your software). Any out- 
line soft font downloaded to a Post- 
Script printer can also be scaled 
accordingly. 

Although the latest PCL version 
(Version V, used in the LaserJet Series 
III) does contain some Hmited font 
scaling and a few other font special ef- 
fects capabilities, most PCL printers 
must have a separate font in the print- 
er for each font attribute and point 
size. In other words, to use Times 10 
point in normal, bold, itahc, and bold 
italic, you must download four files to 
the printer. If you also want to use 
these four Times fonts in a 12-point 
size, you must download four more 
files. 

Font files must be stored either 
on your hard disk or on floppies. They 
take up an enormous amount of disk 
space (to store three typefaces in vari- 
ous point sizes ranging from 6 point 
to 36 point in all four fonts can take 
ten megabytes or more). 

Also, soft fonts require huge 
amounts of printer memory. This 
drastically limits the number of fonts 
and the size of graphics you can use 
per document page. Another PCL dis- 
advantage is that, depending on the 
speed of your computer, it can take a 



74 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 







J 



This graphic was created in a farge size at low resolutfon and then reduced In 

size to increase the number of dots per inch. (Graphic used with permission 

from Dynamic Graphics, Peoria, Illinois.) 



long time to download fonts. Larger 
point sizes can take several minutes. 

Even though PCL font cartridges 
follow the same convention — fonts 
must be present in specific attributes 
and point sizes — they can eliminate 
some of the inconvenience. As men- 
tioned, most cartridges are limited. 
However, a number of megafont car- 
tridges have recently become avail- 
able. Computer Peripherals, for 
example, makes a cartridge called 
Supersets that contains over 400 
fonts. And several companies make 
PostScript emulation cartridges that 
give certain PCL printers all the font 
features of PostScript. PostScript 
printers, in contrast, have no need for 
cartridges. Their outline fonts use sig- 
nificantly less disk or printer storage. 

Another PostScript advantage is 
greater graphics control. Since Post- 
Script draws its lines and arches (rath- 
er than bitmapping them), the 
smoothness of graphic elements isn't 
dependent on the quality of the infor- 
mation sent from the computer (as it 
would be with a bitmapped language 
like PCL). Instead, it's dependent on 
the highest resolution of the printer. 
Any PostScript printer will provide 
output at the limits of its resolution, 
whether that is the standard 300 dpi 
of desktop laser printers or the far 
higher resolution of typesetting ma- 
chines. PostScript printers are capable 
of printing Encapsulated PostScript 
(EPS) graphics, which can contain in- 



tricate patterns and fills unavailable 
in PCL. 

Desktop publishers utilize Post- 
Script laser 300-dpi output to create 
drafts of documents that require high- 
er resolution typesetting. After all the 
revisions have been made, the docu- 
ment is then played out on Allied 
Linotype's Linotronic typesetters at 
1270 dpi or higher for excellent quali- 
ty. All you have to do is take your disk 
to the local graphics service bureau. 

The question of whether 

you need PostScript or 

PCL is not the only 

consideration. 



PCL will drive a few typesetting 

machines, but so far this type of out- 
put hasn't caught on. You could be 
hard-pressed to find a service bureau 
that can typeset from PCL files. 

PostScript is not without its dis- 
advantages. As mentioned, the price 
of PostScript printers has always been 
significantly higher than that of PCL 
printers. Laser printer prices have 
dropped dramatically over the past 
year or so. However, while the price of 
low-end PostScript primers has come 
down by 40 percent (to around 
$3,000), the price of the least-expen- 
sive PCL printers has dropped by 50 



percent (to less than $1 ,000). The gap 
narrows almost to insignificance, 
however, with the introduction of a 
$995 PostScript printer called the 
JetScript by the Printer Works (3482 
Arden Road, Ha>'ward, California 
94545; 41 5-887-61 16), One reason for 
this printer's low cost is that it uses a 
refurbished printer engine. Watch for 
a review of this machine in an upcom- 
ing issue of COjI/PLT£. 

PostScript is also notoriously 
slow. Waiting for intricate or bit- 
mapped graphics to print on a Post- 
Script device can be excruciating. 
However, relatively new technology 
has sped PostScript by as much as a 
factor of 5. Most documents will 
print with little or no delay. 

Before You Buy 

The question of whether you need 
PostScript or PCL is not the only con- 
sideration in buying a laser printer. 
Some printers don't use either lan- 
guage, which means you could have 
trouble using them with some of your 
software. Canon, for example, makes 
several printers that use a language 
called Canon Printer System Lan- 
guage (CaPSL). These printers have 
nine scalable fonts and can be upgrad- 
ed to almost the same standards as 
PostScript. However, at present not 
all software programs support Canon 
printers. There are also printers, such 
as several NEC lasers, that support 
both PCL and PostScript. 

There are many, many laser 
printer manufacturers and distribu- 
tors out there today, and you'll find 
printers with all kinds of configura- 
tions and a wide range of prices. Print- 
er RAM, for example, is an important 
feature. Many printers are shipped 
with only 512K of RAM, which is 
barely enough to download a couple 
of fonts or to print about half of a page 
of graphics. PostScript printers with 
two or three megabytes of RAM can 
store additional data while printing a 
page, freeing up your computer to 
start the next page sooner. 

Printer RAM can almost always 
be upgraded, but at a cost somewhat 
higher than upgrading your comput- 
er's RAM. 

PCL printers handle memory a 
little differently from PostScript print- 
ers, but a good rule of thumb is that 
you'll need a I MB minimum for full- 
page graphics and more than 1 MB if 
you want to use many soft fonts and 
intricate graphics on the same page. 
Printer RAM of 3MB is almost im- 
possible to overload, unless you're do- 
ing high-end desktop publishing. 

Laser printers also come with dif- 
ferent font configurations. Some, such 
as the HP LaserJet Series IIP, come 
with only a few fixed-space fonts, and 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 75 



a few PostScript printers have well 
over the standard 35 fonts resident. 
Not all PostScript printers use tnie 
Adobe PostScript, which could mean 
that Adobe Type 1 (the one used by 
typesetters) downloadable fonts are 
not supported. 

Paper-handling options are also 
important. Some printers cannot han- 
dle paper sizes smaller than 8V2 X 1 1 
inches, and many will not print enve- 
lopes. Some have paper trays that 
hold only 100 sheets of paper, while 
othen have more than one 250-sheet 
paper tray, and many printers can be 



equipped with much larger paper 
trays. Still other printers, such as the 
HP LaserJet Series IID, support du- 
plex printing — printing on both sides 
of the paper. 

These configuration questions 
should all be considered before you go 
shopping for a laser printer. Some- 
times one or two hundred dollars can 
make a world of diiference in the 
printer you finally set on your desk. 
There are many good laser printers 
available and some that are not so 
good. A safe plan would be to pur- 
chase a product that can be upgraded 



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Circle Reader Service Numbef 176 



76 COMPUTE MAY 1991 



later; you never know where your 
computer application might lake you. 

PostScript Alternatives 

Buying a PCL printer for under 
$ 1,000 is for many computer users the 
only economically feasible means for 
obtaining a laser printer. Many PCL 
users find themselves wishing later 
they had the power of PostScript To- 













"^M^ 






I' IkAlj^ 



Rotating, tinting, wrapping, and blend- 
ing — all seen in this example^ — are only 

a sample of the typographtc tricks you 
can play with PostScript. (Graphic used 
with permission from The WRITE Desk- 
top Publisher, Wntura, California.) 



day there are a number of PostScript 
alternatives for most PCL primers — 
everything from low-cost software, 
like GoScript and Freedom of Press, to 
expensive boards and other not-so- 
expensive hardware. 

Probably the most convenient 
and practical solution is a PostScript 
emulation cartridge. PostScript car- 
tridges work the same as font car- 
tridges: Just plug them in and tell your 
software to use PostScript. These car- 
tridges endow PCL printers with all 
35 scalable fonts and all other Post- 
Script functions at a fraction of the 
cost. There are several available, and 
they range from $300 to $700. Ven- 
dors include Computer Peripherals, 
Adobe Systems, Pacific Data, and 
Hewlett-Packard. 

The main thing to remember 
when buying a PostScript cartridge is 
that they all require more than the 
5 12K of RAM that comes standard 
with some PCL printers. Currently, 
most require a minimum of 2.5MB of 
RAM, but Computer Peripheral's Jet- 
Page requires a mere 1.5MB. B 




ONLINE 



GEORGE 



CAMPBELL 



Health is a key issue for all of us. 
Regular checkups and careful liv- 
ing are essential to maintain our- 
selves. Sometimes, however, we 
have questions about health issues 
and need answers. Where can we 
turn? 

Books are one solution, but pop- 
ular medical guides often don't offer 
enough information, and they aren't 
interactive. For PC users with mo- 
demSj there's a better way to get an- 
swen about health. A wealth of online 
resources are available on any heahh 
issue. 

More and more users are signing 
up to take advantage of GEnie's flat- 
rate Star Services. Among those ser- 
vices is GEnie's Medical Roundtable. 
At no extra charge, you can use the 
bulletin board area of this roundtable 
to get the answers you need. 

To access this area, just type med- 
ical dX any GEnie prompt. Once 
you're in the roundtable, choose the 
Medical Bulletin Board option on the 
menu. The bulletin board is divided 
into 1 5 categories, ranging from Clini- 
cal Consulting and AIDS to Medical 
Ethics and Ask the Doctor. Within 
each of these categories, you'll fmd 
hundreds of topics of discussion. You 
can read messages or ask your own 
questions. 

While you can't expect to use this 
service as a substitute for regular med- 
ical care, it's a terrific place to go for 
any medical questions you might 
have. If you ask a question in one of 
the bulletin board areas, you can be 
sure of a quick and accurate response, 
usually from a physician or other 
health professional. 

Just browsing through the topic 
list is fascinating. You'll find discus- 
sions on topics ranging from cancer 
and chiropractors to x-ray safety and 
even mundane topics like foot odor. 

Getting all of that information 
costs no more than using any GEnie 
Star Service. However, you can also 
access the Medical Roundtable's file 
library at GEnie's normal hourly 
rates. Here you'll find files ranging 
from collections of medical papers to 



medicine-related programs for your PC, 
If you're a GEnie user, take a few 
minutes the next time you're online to 
explore the Medical Roundtable. 
Youll be glad you did. 

GEnie offers other medical ser- 
vices, most at an additional cost. To 
get a list of them, give the INDEX 
command at any GEnie prompt; then 
use medicine as a search keyword. 



ANSWERS TO 
QUEST ONS ABOUT 


' 


L 




s 


i 


[ 


1 


1 


^ 


H 





While CompuServe doesn't offer 
the low-cost Hat-rate service that 
makes GEnie so popular, its medical 
forums are extensive. CompuServe 
users seeking health information 
should enter the command GO 
GOODHEALTH at any CompuServe 
prompt to reach the Health and Fit- 
ness forum. 

This forum offers a message area 
where you can ask questions or read 
discussions on almost any heahh- 
related issue. There's a special section 
for teenagers, a section for drug and 
alcohol abuse questions, and sections 
on mental health, nutrition, and many 
other specialized areas. 

As with GEnie, hundreds of files 
and programs are also available for 
downloading in the software library. 



Ranging from transcripts of online 
conferences to a guide for selecting a 
therapist, these files are just one more 
reason to get online. 

CompuServe also offers other 
medicine-related services. There*s a 
forum for diabetics (enter the com- 
mand GO DIABETES), collections of 
articles on AIDS (GO AIDSNEWS), a 
cancer forum (GO CANCER), a fo- 
rum for people with disabilities (GO 
DISABILITIES), and a forum on hu- 
man sexuality (GO HUMAN). Each 
forum offers the same mix of BBS-like 
messages, a library of files, and real- 
time conferences. 

Finally, at an extra cost, you can 
access several databases to search for 
articles and other information from 
medical journals. These services, 
however, are designed for medical 
professionals, and the costs are pro- 
hibitively high. 

For a Ust of forums and health- 
related areas, give the command GO 
INDEX at any CompuServe prompt; 
then search for topics using the word 
medicine as a keyword. 

If you donH use commercial on- 
line services, you still have plenty of 
options for online medical infor- 
mation, Youll find that hundreds of 
BBSs across the country specialize in 
medical issues. Wherever you live, 
there's likely to be a medically orient- 
ed BBS nearby. 

Edward Del Grosso, M.D., oper- 
ates a BBS that acts as a clearinghouse 
for the medical BBS community. His 
BBS, the Black Bag (302-731-1998), is 
a rich source of information on other 
online systems as well as being an ex- 
cellent health-oriented BBS itself 
Read Bulletin H, which lists hundreds 
of active health-oriented systems na- 
tionwide^ — most charge nothing for 
the service, and many of these are run 
by physicians. 

As you explore the world of on- 
line medical information, remember 
that although these BBSs are a source 
of information to help you participate 
in your own health care, none can 
substitute for the care and advice of 
your personal physician. H 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 77 




HARDWARE CLINIC 



MARK MINASE 



Buying a new PC or upgrading an 
old one? Want some good ad- 
vice? Don't buy speed. For the 
past three years, big corporate 
buyers and the PC trade rags have 
been beating the drum about the great 
new PCs: 25- and 33-MHz 386 and 
486 systems have become de rigueur. 
In fact, one large magazine recently 
said that 25-MHz 386s were the new 
entry level system. 

Phooey on that, I say. Your best 
bet is to buy a 16- or 20-MHz 386 or 
SX, save a pile of money over the 
"faster" models, and plow that money 
into faster video and disks. The result 
will be a faster and cheaper system 
than that 33-MHz pile driver you 
wish you could afford. Here's why. 

Your computer's speed is mainly 
determined by four things: the CPU's 
speed, its memory subsystem, its disk 
subsystem, and its video subsystem. 
Making just one of these parts super- 
fast is of no value, since the relative 
pokiness of the other parts holds back 
the whole system. In essence, the sys- 
tem is no faster than its slowest part. 

Let's look first at the CPU. You 
definitely want a 386 or 386SX. 
There's little price difference over a 
286, and the 386 family can do so 
much more than the 286. Don't worry 
about losing in the long run by buying 
an SX; soft ware- wise, it works just 
like a full 386 (a full 386 is officially 
called a DX). You don't buy 386- 
family PCs for the speed; you buy for 
the capabilities, like Windows 386- 
enhanced mode. 

What do megahertz cost? Com- 
paring the prices of a few representa- 
tive bare-bones motherboards, you'll 
find that a 16-MHz SX motherboard 
costs $325 and a 25-MHz DX mother- 
board costs $900. How do they com- 
pare when doing real work? My 
advice is to try it. You won't be able 
to tell the difference for most real- 
world applications. Why is a 16-MHz 
SX so similar in apparent speed to a 
25-MHz DX? It has to do with the 
video and the disk. You see, the video 
is controlled by a video board, which 
plugs into the PC's bus. The disk is 



similarly controlled by the disk con- 
troller board, which also plugs into the 
PC's bus. And there's the mb. 

Virtually all PC systems today 
run their buses al 8 MHz. Spend a zil- 
lion dollars on a 33-MHz DX, and it's 
really only the CPU that runs at 33 
MHz. All the expansion boards run at 
a mere 8 MHz. Every lime that 33- 
MHz computer talks to the video 
board, the whole system slows down 
to 8 MHz — ditto for every disk access. 
Even worse, it probably doesn't run at 
a full 8 MHz, since the video or disk 
board may well be running slower 
than 8 MHz. 




That's why it's silly to pour mon- 
ey into fast CPUs while hobbling 
them with slow peripherals. By spend- 
ing less on the CPU and more on 
drives and video, you balance your 
system. Here's how. 

First, get a fast disk. Disk speeds 
are called access lime or seek time, 
and they are measured in milliseconds 
(ms), thousandths of seconds. With 
access time, the smaller, the better. 
There is no reason why you should get 
stuck with a disk with an access time 
slower than 28ms, yet I see clonemeis- 
ters siill dumping 65ms drives on the 
public! Insist on 28ms or faster. 



Get a fast disk controller. Disk 
controllers are rated by their inter- 
leave factor. Most 286 and 386 sys- 
tems nowadays contain a 1:2 disk 
controller, a $90 item. For $20 more, 
you can purchase a 1: 1 disk controller. 
Such a controller can read the data off 
your disk at twice the speed of a 1:2. 
Why does anyone ship 1:2 systems, 
when 1 : 1 costs only a bit more? Until 
recently, 1:1 controllers were four 
times the price of 1:2 controllers. As a 
result, 1 :2 controllers became a stand- 
ard, and old habits die slowly, I guess. 

Get a fast video board. Ensure 
that you have a 16-bit VGA board, 
rather than the slower 8-bit VGA 
board. Once, 8-bil boards were half 
the price of 16-bil boards, but no 
more. Good 16-bil VGA boards can 
be had for around $80. 

Your PC's memory subsystem 
also affects both your PC's upgrad- 
ability and its speed. You've probably 
heard the terms memory^ cache, inter- 
leaved memory, and wait states. They 
all refer to methods of interfacing the 
CPU to its memory. There's not 
enough room here to explain all of 
them — memor}^ would provide 
enough fodder for several articles. Ba- 
sically, though, no one today makes 
inexpensive memory that is fast 
enough to keep up with today's CPU 
speeds of 16 MHz and up. So manu- 
facturers hook up fast CPUs with slow 
memory and build tricks into the sys- 
tem to minimize the effects of this 
mismatch. Wait states are the worst 
way to handle the speed mismatch, in- 
terleave is a much better way, and 
cache is the best of all. Cache, unfortu- 
nately, also costs more — perhaps too 
much. Don't settle for wait states, 
however; you want a no wait-state, 
interleaved-memory system. 

So you see that buying the 33- 
MHz screamer with the 8~bit video, 
1:2 interleave, and 48ms hard disk 
isn't such a good idea after all. I re- 
cently bought a 16-MHz SX with 16- 
bit video, 1 : 1 interleave, and a 1 20MB 
hard drive (28ms access time). Lots of 
folks think it's a 25-MHz, and heck, 
who am I to dispel their illusion? H 



78 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



Enhance Your Tandy 



Hard Cards and Hard Drives 

IBM /Tandy Switduble, Pre-fonutted for PLUG N" PLAY 



Hard Cards for 1000, 
A,SX,TX,SL,TL,SU2 
|TL/2,TLy3,IBM &comp>tibk. 

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32 Meg 40 MS $289 
21 Meg 40 MS $279 
65 Meg 39 MS $429 



External Hard Drives 

forEX/HX. Includes 

cable and controller 

43Meg39MS $399 
32 Meg 40MS $389 
21 Meg 40MS $379 
65 Meg 39MS $489 



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PC Sprint $75 

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Floppy Drive Solutions 

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•ForaU e»ept 1000, A, EX. HX. SX 
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360Kor720K $129 





Memory to 640K 


1000,Ato640KW/aock,Ser. $229 




256KEXorHXto640K $189 




256K1200 orIBMto640K $189 




384KSX,EX,HX,SLto640K $49 




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Memory Above 640K 




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Redirection, pipes, and filters are 
tools that let DOS users accom- 
plish seemingly impossible tasks. 
First, we need a few definitions. 
Your keyboard is the standard input 
device, and your monitor is the stand- 
ard output device. Together, the key- 
board and monitor are known as 
CON, or the console device. Most 
DOS input comes from the keyboard^ 
and most DOS output is displayed on 
the monitor. 

Redirection allows DOS to accept 
input from a source other than the 
keyboard and to direct output to a 
destination other than the screen. The 
greater- and less-than symbols are 
used to accomplish the redirection, 
and these symbols point out the direc- 
tion of the information flow. 

For example, DIR > DIRFILE 
redirects the output of the DIR com- 
mand (which displays a directory list- 
ing) to a file called DIRFILE, That file 
can then be edited, printed, or treated 
like any other file. 

If DIRFILE had already existed, 
the command would' ve erased the ex- 
isting file and created a new one. Re- 
directed information can be appended 
to the end of an existing file by using 
two greater-than signs: DIR » DIR- 
FILE. Redirection also can be used to 
fetch information from a source other 
than the keyboard. To do this, use a 
less-than symbol to reverse the direc- 
tion of the data flow, as in SORT < 
INPUT.TXT. This command sorts 
the information in the INPUTTXT 
file and displays it, in alphabetical or- 
der, on the screen. 

Piping is similar to redirection, 
but it allows the output of one pro- 
gram to be used as the input for an- 
other program. The vertical bar is 
used as the pipe symbol. 

Many computer users steer clear 
of redirection and piping because the 
results seem unpredictable. The key to 
setting up successful commands lies in 
knowing the distinction between redi- 
rection and piping. Redirection links a 
program with a device or a file; piping 
connects two programs. 

Filters, which modify streams of 



data, are often used in conjunction 
with redirection or piping. DOS 
comes equipped with three filters — 
M0RE.COM, HND.EXE, and 
SORT.EXE. To use these filters, the 
program files must be on your sys- 
tem's default disk or path. 

MORE is a filter commonly used 
to display text files. It displays a file 
one screenful at a time and pauses un- 
til the user presses a key. MORE can 




be used with redirection or with pip- 
ing, depending on the situation. For 
example, TYPE SAMPLE.TXT I 
MORE uses piping because two pro- 
grams (TYPE and MORE) are in- 
volved. The output of the TYPE 
command is piped through the 
MORE filter. The command MORE 
< S-AMPLE.TXT accomplishes the 
same thing, but it does so using re- 
direction. The MORE command gets 
its input from the SAMPLE.TXT file. 

SORT can be used with redirec- 
tion as indicated above, but if you 
want a sorted directory listing, you 
must use piping because SORT and 
DIR are both commands. DIR I 
SORT pipes the output of the DIR 



command through the SORT filter. 

There are several options you can 
use with the SORT command. You 
can sort a directory listing by file ex- 
tension, for example, using the com- 
mand DIR I SORT /+ 10. The /+ 10 
specifies that the sorting should be 
based on the tenth character in each 
line, the file extension. It also is possi- 
ble to reverse the direction of the sort 
by including the /R switch. This 
would order entries from Z to A, then 
from 9 to 0. 

Both SORT and MORE create 
temporary files on the default disk 
while they work, so be certain the disk 
is neither full nor write protected, or 
you'll get an error. 

The FIND filter locates specific 
text strings in text files. The syntax for 
this filter is FIND switch ''text string'' 
filename. For example, FIND *Tred" 
NAMES.TXT displays all the lines 
containing the name Fred in a file 
called NAMES.TXT. FIND looks for 
an exact match, so if you're looking 
for Fred, you can't spell it FRED. 

You can specify more than one 
filename for FIND to scan, but wild- 
cards are not allowed. The switches 
that are used with the FIND filter are 
/N, which supplies a line number for 
each line it displays; /C, which simply 
counts the number of occurrences of 
the text string; and /V, which displays 
all the lines not containing the text 
string. Here are two examples of how 
to combine filters, piping, and 
redirection. 

CHKDSK /V I HND ^BAT" 
runs CHKDSK with the /V (verbose) 
switch, creating a list of all files on the 
disk. That list is then piped into the 
FIND filter, which searches for the 
string .BAT, the batch-file extension. 
What you see onscreen is a catalog of 
all the batch files on your disk. This 
command can locate a group of files 
or a single file. Just be sure to type the 
filename in all uppercase letters. 

SORT < NAMES.TXT > NA- 
MES. SRT uses SORT to alphabetize 
the names in the NAMES.TXT file. 
The sorted output will be placed in a 
file called NAMES.SRT. E 



eo 



COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




ARTS & LETTERS 



ROBERT BIXBY 



Everyone agrees that there needs to 
be a friendly, smoothly operating 
graphical interface for the PC. The 
bare command line interface of 
traditional DOS-based computers is 
frightening to newcomers and beloved 
by only a small minority of the com- 
puting public. 

Most of us cope with it as best we 
can. This coping has generated a 
hungry market for shells, macros, and 
task switchers. 

Most computer users also agree 
that the PCs graphical interface isn't 
necessary for everything. Spread- 
sheets, databases, and word proces- 
sors generally operate more quickly 
when text based because the text 
screen can be updated more quickly 
than the graphics screen. 

The graphical interface is best for 
layout and drawing programs that 
help you visualize an eventual print- 
out. There's no argument about 
whether artists need a graphical inter- 
face, only whether Windows is the 
graphical interface we need and 
whether Windows 3.0 is a step in the 
right direction. 

With its slightly friendlier inter- 
face, Windows has helped computer- 
phobes by reducing some of the 
anxiety associated with an empty 
screen. Almost no one cringes when 
the opening Windows screen appears. 

Furthermore, Windows has es- 
tablished an operational standard. 
Even without a good manual, you can 
usually figure out how a Windows 
product works. 

As you move from one Windows 
program to another, menus work the 
same way, dialog boxes work pretty 
much the same way, toolboxes work a 
little bit the same way, and so on. This 
similarity among programs allows you 
to master programs more rapidly. 

But despite these advantages, 
there are problems. The major prob- 
lem with Windows (and I am not the 
first to point this out) is that if s slow. 
It's ponderous. Sometimes it's glacial 

Artists of all kinds live on feed- 
back. If you are working with crayons 
or oils, you can see your graphic even 



as it is being made. The line of motion 
through the center of the canvas or a 
shadow remains visible. 

Compare this to working with a 
graphics program running under Win- 
dows. If you've just begun your draw- 
ing, you'll see rapid refreshes of the 
screen. The more complex the draw- 
ing, the longer it will take before you'll 
be able to see it displayed in full. 

Based on my experience with 
Windows graphics programs, my 
drawings must be out on the fringe in 
terms of complexity, because I'm al- 




ways crashing programs or causing 
them to beg for mercy because there 
are too many objects on the screen. 

Sometimes (and particularly 
when the project includes extensive 
text, each letter of which is treated as 
an individual graphic element), the 
text literally crawls onto the preview 
screen letter by letter. 

Programs that take maximum ad- 
vantage of Windows' muliiXSisking are 
particularly bad in this regard, indicat- 
ing to me that the problem is with 
Windows or the hardware rather than 
the application. 

I'm not the only person who has 
trouble operating Windows, At a re- 



cent Windows seminar, the embar- 
rassed presenter had to do some fast 
clicking and dragging to make his ap- 
plications operate. A warning box 
kept appearing telling him that too 
many applications were running and 
asking him to close some windows. 
(Here's the punch line: Nothing was 
running on his multi megabyte 386 but 
the Program Manager.) 

Maybe Windows isn't the pana- 
cea we've been led to believe it is. 
Take as an example Ventura Soft- 
ware's port to Windows of Ventura 
Publisher, It's an excellent program 
(no less so than the GEM version), 
which in a single step was upgraded to 
the professional level and took on an 
alien environment. 

Unfortunately, this advance was 
not without some pitfalls. New re- 
leases may be better, but the version I 
received crashes semiregularly. 

Save early and often, the standard 
advice with all software, applies dou- 
bly to complex software like Ventura 
Publisher, but despite similar warn- 
ings in my book on GEM Ventura, I 
have never seen Ventura Publisher 
version 2.0 crash. From that stand- 
point, you might say that the Win- 
dows port represents one great leap 
forward and half a great leap back. 

Fortunately, Ventura has elected 
to continue supporting the GEM op- 
erating system version, which it has 
had two years to debug. I hope Ventu- 
ra will remain loyal to the original in- 
terface for a long time to come. 

What choices do you have if you 
want to work with graphics but you're 
driven to distraction by the inadequa- 
cies and delays that seem to be built 
into Windows? 

There are a few options open, in- 
cluding graphics programs that oper- 
ate under other shells and programs 
that dispense with a shell entirely and 
go it alone against DOS, providing 
their own collections of menus, dialog 
boxes, macros, and so forth. 

We'll talk about a grab bag of 
graphics packages that provide an al- 
ternative to Windows programs in the 
next "Arts & Letters" column. m 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 01 



#HOME OFFICE 



WORKPLACE 



DANIEL J ANAL 



For $ 1 0,000 you can hire a fancy 
designer, print a couple of thou- 
sand brochures, stuff them into en- 
velopes, buy a whole lot of stamps, 
and send the brochures to everyone 
you hope will buy your services. 

Or you could write a book, build 
credibility, and establish yourself as 
an expert. This is the wonderful, true 
story of how you can be a published 
author. All ii takes is a great idea, dis- 
cipline, marketing savv7, salesman- 
ship — and a PC. 

I had always wanted to write a 
book, ever since the second grade. I 
went to a top journalism school, 
worked at a great American newspa- 
per chain for eight years, won awards, 
and rose through the editorial ranks. 
Then I went into public relations and 
handled big-name computer accounts 
for four years. When I started my own 
agency five years ago, I learned tactics 
that I realized would help people run 
their companies better. So I decided 
to write a book called How to Publi- 
cize High-Tech Products and Services. 

I wrote 80 percent of the book be- 
tween Christmas and New Year's 
1 989 while everyone else was party- 
ing, I showed the book to friends, who 
suggested changes and additions. I 
sent the manuscript to a big-time edi- 
tor. He liked it but told me he could 
not publish it because the topic was 
narrow^ "YouMl sell 10,000 copies," 
he said. "But you^Il sell them. We 
can't." 

Ironically, an industry guru also 
said rd sell 1 0,000 copies. I decided to 
publish it under the lOK Press im- 
print (10,000 copies, lOK^get it?), 
figuring the name sounded computer- 
ish and also active (like a IDK race). 
Also, because people don't value 
^'vanity press'* publications, I didn't 
use my name in the publishing 
imprint. 

I tried to design the book with my 
desktop publishing software. However, 
there are so many design issues — mar- 
gins, leading, borders, cover art, mar- 
rying text and graphics— that the best 
design I did looked amateurish. I de- 
cided to spend real money and get the 



job done correctly. I asked friends to 
recommend designers. 

Each designer works and charges 
differently. One designer quoted me 
two prices: one if he entered all the 
codes on his computer and a second, 
lower price if I did the coding on my 
computer based on his design. Prices 
ranged from $25 to $75 an hour. I set- 
tled on a designer who offered a fixed 
price for designing the cover, text, 
and brochure— about $3,000 plus 
expenses. 




If you're planning to self-publish 
a book, look for a designer who has 
experience creating books. There's a 
world of difference between designing 
a book and designing a brochure. An 
experienced designer will save you 
time, money, and credibility. 

After the book was designed, I 
called for printing bids. Through re- 
ferrals, I found a company that prints 
only books. I gave that bid to a friend 
in the business, and he matched it. I 
was able to get 3,000 copies for about 
$5,000. 

Next came the marketing. I put 
the book, still in its WordPerfect for- 
mal, into a three-ring binder and rent- 
ed a booth at a trade show for people 
in the high-tech industry — the very 
people I thought my book would help. 

At that show, an important thing 
happened. I created new markets. My 
book targets small companies that do 
their own publicity because they can't 
or won't hire a public relations agen- 



cy. Bui when a PR agency represenia- 
live walked by, I told him it would be 
a great training tool for newly-hired 
employees. He agreed. One woman 
wanted to use ihe book as an incen- 
tive to gel people to sign up for her 
seminars. Another woman who oper- 
ates a convention hall wanted to give 
books to exhibitors. ,A major maga- 
zine bought 200 copies to turn their 
advertisers into better marketers. The 
Software Publishers Association 
bought 1 50 copies to give to new 
members. This wasn't just a book; it 
was a premium incentive as well, I re- 
ceived enough orders to pay almost all 
my expenses. 

To make selling easier, I arranged 
to take VISA and MasterCard orders. 
Since banks don't like giving cards to 
home-based companies or mail-order 
firms, I had to convince the banker I 
was more than just your average home 
office worker I sent him a two-page 
backgrounder and copies of articles 
about my business that had appeared 
in USA Today, Success, and several 
other periodicals. I also told him I 
sold the book at conventions and 
seminars. When he asked about mail 
order, I repealed my assertion, I never 
lied. He didn't pursue the question, 
and I didn'i volunteer information. 

If you want to turn yourself into 
an expert, then write and publish a 
book. Just keep in mind these essen- 
tial steps: 

• Write a book that appeals to a lot of 
people. 

• Find an experienced and economical 
designer. 

• Shop around for a printer. 

• Find companies that might buy mul- 
tiple copies. 

• Create new markets. 

• Sell. Sell. Sell. 

The beauty of this marketing 
strategy is that even if you don't sell 
the book, you can give it to prospects. 
They'll think you're smart because 
you wrote a book. And if they hire you 
for a project, you just might earn back 
your publishing costs. h 



82 



COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




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THE ESSENTIAL 

HOME OFFICE 

TOOLBOX 



WHAT ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT TOOLS 

FOR THE HOME OFFICE? THESE ARE 

THE FAVORITES OF FOUR PROFESSIONALS 

WORKING AT HOME. 



Tony Roberts 
I operate a public relations and desktop publishing 
business out of my home. I spend most of my ener- 
gies writing, laying out pages, and compiling data- 
bases of contacts at newspapers and radio stations. 

Interface. Windows made a run at earning my vote 
for best interface, but it still falls short. I like Windows 
3.0, but it can be slow and cumbersome even with a 
386 and many megs of memory. Since I need several 
Windows-basQd applications, I use it often, but I keep 
dropping to DOS, specifically 4D0S, when I need 
more than a program launcher. 4D0S is a command 
processor that replaces C0MMAND.COM. It adds 
new power to most DOS commands and soups up the 
batch processor, 4 DOS, which is what DOS ought to 
have been, is distributed as shareware. Try it.E> 



CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 



1 



14 



MAY 1991 



O tA P U T E 85 



Word processor. I doubt that any 
word-processing program will ever 
top Xy Write in my mind. Xy Write is 
fast, versatile, and best of all, text- 
based. I string together a lot of words 
in the course of a day; when I write, I 
want to concentrate on the words, not 
on how they look in different fonts 
and sizes. The makers of Xy Write 
support their product well, constantly 
updating it to make sure it's not left 
behind as new equipment, such as la- 
ser printers, and new platforms, such 
as Windows, change the way we work. 

Utilities/desk accessories, Fm no 
fan of pop-up calendars, calculators, 
or card files. For me, a hand-held cal- 
culator works far better than any pop- 
up, and it never creates a memory 
conflict no matter what software Fm 
using. I can get along fine using my 
traditional desktop calendar and Ro- 
lodex. A file finder, though, makes a 
great utility. There are dozens avail- 
able, and they go by names like Wher- 
eis, Locate, and File Find File finders 
often come as part of larger packages. 
A good file finder will save you hours 
a week tracking down misplaced and 
forgotten documents and programs. 

Disk management. Fve relied on 
PC Tools Deluxe for years for backing 
up and optimizing hard disks, unde- 
leting files, and sector editing. The 
software is easy to use and, best of all, 
effective, Fve had no problems restor- 
ing backups when necessary, and the 
disk optimizations are fast and effec- 
tive. PC Tools includes a DOS shell to 
help with file-management chores, but 
I use it rarely. Because Fve had such 
good luck with this program, Fve had 
little reason to look elsewhere for 
disk-backup software. 

Telecommunications. Telix, a 
shareware program, meets my needs 
as an easy-to-use telecommunica- 
tions program that does it all. Telix 
covers the gamut of file-exchange 
protocols and can handle nearly any 
configuration. The software's script- 
generating language allows you to cre- 
ate extremely 




sophisticated programs to handle tele- 
communications chores automatically. 

Database/file management. 
Ashton-Tate's dBASE III Pius is a 
heck of a program, and it's done great 
work for thousands of businesses. 
What I like best about dBASE is its 
programmability and its flexibility. It 
may be more than you need to track 
your videotape library, but if you're 
dealing with hundreds of inventory 
items and thousands of customers, it 
can do the job. Because dBASE is so 
ubiquitous, most other software^ — 
spreadsheets and mail-merge applica- 
tions, for example — makes some pro- 
vision for importing dBASE data. So 
far Fve stayed clear of problem-plagued 
dBASE IV, but it may be time to look 
into it, as the latest release appears to 
have resolved most of the difficulties. 

Personal information manager. 
Info Select, a recent enhancement of 
the long-popular Tornado, handles 
information management on my sys- 
tem. This program is speedy and ef- 
fective. Answer the phone, and before 
the small talk has finished, you can lo- 
cate and display acres of pertinent 
information having to do with your 
caller. This program, more than any- 
thing else, has helped me organize cli- 
ent lists, project information, 
deadlines, and siblings' birthdays. 

Spreadsheet/financial, Quicken is 
clearly the best financial program for 
the general public. For a household 
and/or a small service-based business, 
it's all you need to handle the check- 
books, budgeting, accounting, and re- 
porting. For a decade, people have 
talked about using computers to bal- 
ance their checkbooks. With Quiclcen, 
this notion finally makes sense. Intuit 
has announced a new version of the 
program, Quicken 4.0. 1 haven't seen 
it yet, but I ordered the upgrade right 
away. In the spreadsheet arena, don*t 
overlook Quattro Pro, soon to be up- 
graded to Quattro Pro 2.0. This is a 
major-league spreadsheet with a ma- 
jor-league list price, but Borland*s Phi- 
lippe Kahn has sent me at least 15 
letters in the last year offering me a 
$99 special. If you're on any high-tech 
mailing list, you've received one, too. 
If you need a high-end spreadsheet, 
find a way to quaUfy for Kahn's offer. 

Graphics/DTF. When desktop 
publishing for clients, I use both Aldus 
PageMaker and Ventura Publisher, 
depending on the client and the job. If 
a client owns one of the programs, Fm 
usually asked to work in that format. 
Of the two, I lean toward PageMaker, 
maybe because I learned it first. Also, 
I prefer PageMaker's Windows envi- 
ronment to Ventura's GEM environ- 
ment. ( Ventura Publisher has a 
new Windows version, but I 
haven't tried it yet.) 



Programming language. Over the 

years Fve programmed in BASIC, 
Pascal, and machine language. In the 
early days of personal computing, pro- 
gramming was often the only way to 
get software tailored to your needs. 
Today's systems are much more com- 
plex, and my programming abilities 
haven't kept up. Besides, good soft- 
ware can be found for most applica- 
tions these days, I stiil enjoy 
programming, though, and I find I 
can be most effective on small pro- 
jects^ — writing telecommunications 
scripts, creating DOS batch files, and 
inventing useful macros for my word 
processor and spreadsheet. 

George Campbell 
As a computer journalist and 
shareware author, I spend long 
days at home in front of my com- 
puter. Top-quality software is essen- 
tial to my work. Many times 
shareware programs fill my needs for 
a low cost. 

Interface. Since I started using 
IBM-compatible computers in 1983, 
Fve always been a command line fa- 
natic. That's beginning to change now, 
with the introduction of Microsoft 
Windows 3.0. While I still prefer the 
classic DOS prompt for many jobs, 
the multitasking tools in Windows, 
along with Windows applications like 
Ami Pro from Lotus, have begun to 
lead me astray. 

These days, I spend about half 
my computing time in the Windows 
environment. Still, for file operations 
and many of the programs I use, the 
command line makes the most sense. 

Word processor. I make my living 
with words, so my word processor is 
very important to me. When Fm work- 
ing with pure text, I use Microsoft 
Word 5.0. 1 like its logical interface, 
fast editing tools, and powerful macro 
language. By the time you read this. 
Word 5.5 will be available. Its new 
WindowsAikii interface makes it even 
easier to use, so Fm planning to 
switch as soon as I can. 

When I need to add graphics, 
charts, or complicated layouts to my 
documents, I fire up Windows and 
run Ami Pro. With its ease of use, 
WYSIWYG display, desktop publish- 
ing features, and powerful graphics 
tools, it's a great program. 

Utilities/desk accessories. I use 
several utility programs regularly, but 
two stand out above the others: Ver- 
non Buerg's List and Phil Katz's 
PKZIP. For reading ASCII text files, 
there just isn't a better program than 
List, With its scrolling, searching, and 
file-selection tools, it makes dealing 
with text files a breeze. 

PKZIP takes care of all my file- 
archiving needs. It has become every- 



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Lotus® 1-2-3 Release 3T □ 701533 D 701535 

Lotus® 1-2-3 Release 2.2... , D 701523 0701525 

Lotus® 1-2-3 Release 2.0 D 701503 D 701505 

Lotus® 1-2-3 Macros D 701513 D 701515 

WoixiPerfect® 5.1„.„ D 726113 D 726115 

WordPerfect® 5.0 □ 726153 D 726155 

MS-DOS* 4.01 D 700243 D 700245 

MS-DOS* 3.3 .....D 700233 D 700235 

dBASE in PLUS'^ n 703403 D 703405 

Symphony''' D 701803 D 701805 

Using the PC D 700513 D 700515 



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Circte Readtr Sorvice Number 164 



one's standard file-compression utili- 
ty. Since I spend a lot of lime online, 
downloading files, I use this program 
dozens of times each day. 

Disk management. To keep my 
hard disk organized and running 
smoothly, I use PC Tools Deluxe, 
However, I only installed parts of the 
program on my disk. 1 use its PC Shell 
to move files around quickly and to 
maintain the structure of my 80MB 
hard disk. The Compress program is 
the only other part of PC Tools I use. 
This disk-optimizing program quickly 
takes care of fragmented files and 
helps keep my busy hard disk clean 
and efficient. 

Telecommunications. Since I 
spend several hours a day online with 
my modem, I need a powerful com- 
munications program. ProComm Plus 
is my choice for this job. It offers the 
power I need along with an easy-to- 
use interface and a powerful script 
language that automates my online 
sessions. 

I also run a busy BBS. I looked at 
several BBS programs before choosing 
Wildcat! from Mustang Software. It's 
easy for callers to use and needs a 
minimum of maintenance by the sy- 
sop. And, since it can support multi- 
ple phone lines, it will let me expand 
the BBS. 

Database/file management. Jim 
Button's PC-File 6.0 is the database 
that fills all my needs. I started using 
PC'File years ago and have upgraded 
the program with each new version. 
Its low cost, dBASE compatibility, 
and powerful features make it perfect 
for maintaining customer lists, ad- 
dress books, and even a database of 
my video collection. 

Best of all, it*s available in a 
shareware version, which lets you try 
the program out to make sure it fits 
your needs. While it probably 
couldn't handle the database needs of 
a Fortune 500 company, it sure works 
for me. 

Personal information manager. 
I've looked at a few personal infor- 
mation management programs but 
just haven't found any need for them. 
I keep my address book in a PC- File 
database, use Microsoft Word for note 
taking, and write my appointments 
and deadlines by hand on a wall cal- 
endar. Call me old-fashioned. 

Spreadsheet/financial. My fi- 
nances are pretty simple. I use the 
shoebox method of accounting and 
manage pretty well. I find that it takes 
more time to enter my limited finan- 
cial records in a financial package 
than it does to add everything up at 
tax time. 

I do use a spreadsheet program, 
however, to create charts and gridlike 
comparison sheets of products I re- 

aa COMPUTE MAY 1991 



view. For this simple chore, I chose a 
shareware spreadsheet, TurboCalc, 
from P & M Software. It has all the 
power I need and can export files in 
DIF format for use by other spread- 
sheets. COMPUTEI's PC included 
TurboCalc on its January 1990 disk. 

Graphics/DTP. Since I switched 
to Windows for my graphical 
interface needs, I've found that 
the Paintbrush program includ- 
ed with Windows 3.0 satisfies the 
artist in me. The PCX files it creates are 
compatible with every apphcation I use, 
and I never have to leave Windows. 

I occasionally produce a flier or a 
small newsletter for a user group. I 
once used Ventura Publisher for these 
chores, but now I've switched to Ami 
Pro, It can easily handle a ten-page 
newsletter, and it's far easier to use 
than Ventura Publisher. 

Programming language. Like 
most PC users, I began to learn pro- 
gramming with the GW-BASIC inter- 
preter included with my copy of MS- 
DOS. These days, I produce share- 
ware software, so I need a compiled 
language. Fortunately, I didn't have to 
give up BASIC I use QuickBASIC 4.5. 

Its use of a structured program- 
ming style, along with easy access to 
BIOS functions, lets me write state-of- 
the-art software quickly. Best of all, 
programs written in QuickBASIC are 
easy to maintain, since B.ASIC is more 
like English than most of the widely 
used programming languages. 

Alan R. Bechtold 
I have enslaved several personal 
computers to help edit Info-Mat 
Magazine, an electronically dis- 
tributed news weekly published by 
BBS Press Service. I edit the magazine 
and write many of the news and fea- 
ture items. I also freelance, writing 
and editing newsletters and other pub- 
lications, including Online Digital 
Music Review, I can't remember what 
it was like to type on a typewriter. 

Interface. Vm still attached to the 
DOS command line, probably be- 
cause I'm always finding something I 
want to do in DOS that one shell or 
another won't let me do easily, if at 
all. The command line always lets me 
do it. It's this trust in the command 
line that makes The Norton Com- 
mander o. faworitQ, At first, 1 dressed 
up my system with Commander's 
wonderful windowed point-and-shoot 
menus. It wasn't long, however, before 
my command line addiction took over 
and I found myself trying to get back to 
the basics, aborting out of the menus 
I'd designed. Without the menu inter- 
face, Norton Commander is basically 
a disk-management system that al- 
lows constant access to the DOS com- 
mand line. I can always live with that. 





/ 



Word processor. 
WordStar 4.0 is my choice, 

plain and simple. I tried 4.5 and 
5.0 and 5.5 and went right back to 4.0. 
Mv first word processor was Word- 
Star 2.3 for CP/M and 4.0 on DOS. 
It's what I'm used to. I've tried others 
that claim to emulate WordStar, 
Many do a good job, but they're not 
good enough to keep me using them. 

Wordstar 4.0 maintains the pur- 
est feel of the WordStar I know and 
love and offers advanced features, 
such as the built-in spelling checker 
and thesaurus, that make it far more 
useful than the earlier versions. 

Utilities/desk accessories. The 
utilities I use most often are 
PK Ware's PKZIP and PKUNZIP 
(both available as one product) and 
System Enhancement Associate's 
ARC + PLUS pro^TRm, These pro- 
grams let me squeeze one or more 
files into smaller single files to make 
the many file transfers I do every day 
faster and less expensive. Otherwise, I 
don't even use an onscreen calculator. 
WordStar 4.0's math function usually 
ser\^es all my addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, and division needs. 

Disk management. The Norton 
Commander handles any disk man- 
agement tasks that I don't care to han- 
dle at the DOS level I use it most 
often to move files from one nested 
subdirectory to another and to clean 
up my hard disk. When your directory 
tree has many branches, just typing 
out those long paths is a chore. Norton 
Commander reduces this to a simple 
point-and-shoot operation. The pro- 
gram's split-screen layout provides a 
clear view of two different directories 
at once. Even an old command line 
addict like me can see the benefits of 
vastly reduced keystrokes. 

Telecommunications. ProComm 
Plus is my telecommunications pack- 
age of choice. There are a lot of good 
communications programs, and I've 
tried most, but I always go back to 
ProComm Plus because it offers a 
wide variety of file-transfer protocols 
and the most efficient and persistent 



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utilization of each 
protocol it ofTers. This variety 
and reUabiUty, combined with the 
program's easy menu-driven opera- 
tion, huge automatic diaHng directory, 
and extensive macro language for use 
when creating your own automated 
communications sessions, make it a 
hands-down choice for me. I've also 
run a bulletin board system, for client 
and general pubUc access, for over 
five years, and TBBS is the choice 
there. The program's ability to handle 
up to 32 incoming telephone hnes on a 
single AT is simply uncanny. 

Database/file management. 
dBASE is my favorite database man- 
agement program. As with WordStar, I 
started out running dBASE II on a 
CP/M computer, so it's a program I've 
long been famihar with. I tried dBASE 
IV and went back to dBASE III Plus. 
dBASE IV was too bulky, required too 
much hard disk space, and didn't run 
with the speed and agility of dBASE 
III Plus, which handles all the data- 
management tasks I throw at it. 

Personal information manager. 
This was a completely new software 
category barely a year ago. Because I 
spend almost every working day ma- 
nipulating information, I immediately 
fell in love with the category itself I 
also fell in love with Lotus Agenda, 
one of the most flexible, powerful, and 
imaginative products to come along 
in years. I like the way Agenda lets me 
enter my data free-form and then ar- 
range it any way I please after the fact. 
That's the way information really 
happens, after all. Agenda 1.0 created 
this category, and 2.0 is keeping it on 
the leading edge. 

Spreadsheet/financial. Unfortu- 
nately, Fve never manipulated as 
much cash as I do information, so I've 
never had the need for a spreadsheet 
program, For home use, I run CheX, 



the shareware checkbook 
program I got from COM- 
PUTEI's PC {Maich 1990). 
In my office, I use Quick- 
en, which maintains the 
checkbook approach 
that CheX uses but of- 
fers the kind of report- 
generation, billing, 
and check-printing 
capabilities that are 
necessary for run- 
ning a small busmess. 
Graphics/DTP. 
I draw with PC 
Paintbrush. It's a 
full-featured, pow- 
erful drawing pro- 
gram that allows 
me to sketch freehand 
or draw with all the straight- 
edge, curve, circle, and square 
drawing aids I need. I love the variety 
of shading and pen styles. PC Paint- 
brush drawings can also be easily incor- 
porated into page designs created with 
my favorite desktop publisher, Time- 
works' Publish It!. I prefer Publish It! 
over others because it's reasonably 
small and will run on a standard 8088- 
based laptop PC without too much 
trouble or the need for a hard disk. 

Programming language. I'm still 
stuck on BASIC for general program- 
ming purposes, but I also write some 
programs in dBASE III Plus. BASIC 
is just that — basic. It's simple and 
straightforward. But most important, 
it's the one I've learned to use — and I 
haven't had the lime it takes to learn 
another language. dBASE III Pius was 
simple to learn because so much of it 
is based on straightforward English. 
It's a language I can put to work on all 
my database operations. 






■om Campbell 

I'm a columnist for COMPUTE 
and chief developer of Builder for 
Hyperkinetix. My memorable first 
exposure to programming was using a 
Commodore VIC-20 and devouring 
every word of COMPUTE! magazine 
starting with the September 1983 is- 
sue. My writing style was strongly in- 
fluenced by the writing of Jim Butter- 
field. I use computers for writing and 
programming at home and at work. 
Interface. My favorite interface 
on a PC is the DOS command line. I'd 
gladly trade it for the Macintosh 
MultiFinder but never Windows, 
OS/2 Presentation Manager, or any 
other replacement currently available 
on the PC. The command line is lean, 
logical, and universal. The others only 
supplement it, and none can replace it 
completely. 

Word processor, Microsoft Word 
by a mile. Word isn't for everyone, 
but here's why it's the standard at my 



company. First of all, its style sheets 
mean that with a small amount of 
training anyone can produce attrac- 
tive, richly formatted documents that 
all look as if they came from the same 
company (you'd be surprised at how 
few organizations of any size can say 
this). Style sheets also make mainte- 
nance a breeze; Change the style sheet 
for business letters, and everyone's 
letters will inherit the change with no 
individual effort. Second, its ability to 
generate indexes and tables makes 
Word the only game in town. We rou- 
tinely produce manuals over 300 
pages long, and in this business, you 
can't do an index by hand every time 
a manual changes. Programmers here 
use QEdit. It's fiexible, reconfigurable, 
easy to learn; and it loads quickly. 

Utilities/desk accessories. The 
Norton Utilities' Quick Undelete is 
worth the price all by itself, and SYS- 
INFO also gets frequent workouts. 
We bought PC Tools Deluxe for back- 
up, and it became the company's 
standard database manager and ap- 
pointment maker as well. Except for 
Borland's languages, there's no better 
value on the market. 

Disk management My compa- 
ny's own HYPE utilities are my 
choice for disk management. They're 
absolutely free (we don't sell them; we 
only give them away). HYPE is avail- 
able on BBSs everywhere. I use the 
file finder, the disk statistics, and the 
memory statistics utilities every day. 

Telecommunications, I'm not 
thrilled with any telecommunications 
program. The ones I use are Pro- 
Comm Plus (95 percent of the time) 
and PC Tools Deluxe (the other 5 per- 
cent). I have never yet felt comfort- 
able with a telecommunications 
program or with most BBS software. 
I'm a regular on CompuServe, but 
learning to use it was a nightmare, and 
having to run a telecomm program on 
lop of that was no fun. I look forward 
to the telecomm program that's so 
easy even / can like it. 

Database/file management. For 
DBF files, 1 normally use PC Tools 
Deluxe. I'm irritated by its 5000- 
record limitation, but otherwise it's a 
godsend. But nothing beats Hyper Pad 
for putting together small or free-form 
database systems. It has the ideal 
combination of a language and appli- 
cations generator for someone like 
me. I need to create small databases 
quickly every month or so, then dis- 
tribute them throughout the compa- 
ny. The new version lets me include 
the HyperPad Browser ($99.95 to reg- 
istered HyperPad ustrs) with any ap- 
plication I want to send out. 
HyperPad ^ves me tremendous turn- 
around time and just the right set of 
features. It even imports DBF files. > 



90 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



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BUSINESS/ACCOUNTING/FINANCE 

a Business Forms (117} - 100 form letters for ail purposes (enptoyment forms, coniracts. etc 3 

a Business Kit (1 18) - Two pfograTis for smaSS businesses, Sunple Bookkeeper and Billing Slaiement. 

3 Contact Plus (140, 141)- Aeon taci nranagement system, rolodex. autodials r, and mail Usi manager. hD 

,i Form Master (142) - Afi easy-to-uSG tJusiness tofm genaraiof Create any form easily' 

D Legal Forms (149) - A dont-yourseJf legal forms kn 

a Pony Express (1S8) - Compafes cost and delivery nme Ot Posia! Servfce and UPS delivofy opiions, 

a Zlpkey (159) - A complete city level directory of 5-digil zip codes and 3-digit telephone area codes, M:J 

QZPAY 3 (184,185) - A fufllealured. simple-to-use payroll package ■: i ■, , h1 

3 Solve-Jll (186) - Dogs all necessary financial caSculations (IRR. PV, FV. annuitiesj. 

D Slock Cliarting System (188) - A portfolio managemenl system. Supports all lypes of transactions. 5 1 2K 

LlTaktn' Care of Bu*iiie»» (192-197) - A fully integrated menu driven accounting system. ..i 1:1 .kf.i 



SPREADSHEET 

a At'Eaiy-As (255) - A fantastic Lotus 1-2-3 com pa I idle spreadshem program. 

Q Lotus HAacros (265) ■ A collection of powerful n^acros (or 1 -2-3 or compat>ble programs 
a Lotus Templates (269) - Lots ol use'ul templates for Lofus compaiible programs. 
a Pivoli (262) 7 Pfint your spreadsheets sideways, Dotmainx prmier needed 

WORD PROCESSING 

D PC-Wiite 3,03 (325-327) - Full-featured word processing witti spell checking, ,3 rj L^■^^^ 

3 WP 5.0/5,1 Ari/Graptiks (375.376) - A big collection of clip- art in^ges for WordPerfact (2 disknj 

iJ WP 5.0 Learning System (380.381) • Learn to use WordPerfect 5.0 quickly and easily, (2 disks) 

□ WP 5.0/5.1 Macros (385,386) ■ Over 100 excellent macros for WordPedect. ,2 j i-^i 

Q Readability Plus ( 804) - Helps yC"^ J^j^^_^_yo^'' writing siyle to tt>e imaf^Oedaudience. 

UTIUT IES 

D400S (415) - Adds many new and enhanced commands to DOS ho 

D Disk Spoot II (416) - Sets up a print spooling environment wnere printed output is spooled lo diSk, HD 

LI HD Backup (424) • An easy-lo-use program that backs up your hard dnve on floppy disks, - ID 

a List 7.3 (430) - The best file wiewmg utility ever created' A must- ha ^^e program. 

U Masterkeys (436) - OisK multi-utifity like Norton Utilities, Youtl u&e this one a lot! 

□ TreeView [472) ■ A su pen or DOS cChTimand sheSl with pull*down r>enus. 
D Viruscan (473) - Scans the eniire co-nputer system for vrnjses. Excelfent! 



J 
i 



EDUCATION 

LJ Algebrsx (604) An eitcelient algebra tutor for the beginning lo advanced student, CGA 

□ Computer/DOS Tutor (609) - Makes learning to use the compuler easy — and funi 

Q PC-Glossary (61 6) - A great source of hundreds of definitions and explanations of computer termtnology, 

O French I & I! (616,619) * Master the French language with this 2 disk set, Requ.res BASC 

J Googol Math (629) - A math teaming system with great graphcs and several levels Of difficulty. CGA 

3 PC-FastType (637) - Watch your WPM soar as you praciice wish this interactive typng teacher, CHA 

■J play 'n Learn (64S) - A coiioction of si*, learning games for small chilOren 2-5 years, fi-v 

3 Sctiool Mom (654) - lessons on math, art, music, and sposing for children £-12 years oW, CGA 

J Spanish I & tl (658,659) - Th(S 2 disk set makes <earn-ng Spanisfi vocabulary easier n* n . tc^ BASIC 

Zi Spe«d Read (66S) - Teaches you the principles and concepts of speed readang, 

U Total Recall [671} * A menu-driven learning environment that helps you learn almos: any subject, 

3 Typing Teacher (673) ■ Helps you practice and improve! Tracks and displays your progress. 

G Our United States (677) • A fun U,S invia game with questions atx>ul each state. 

□ Verbal Vanquish (680) - Teaches le^l-taking strategies for the verbal portion of entrance exams. 5t2K 
a Animated Alphabet (686-688) - These colorful animations teach children Ihe alphabeL (4 disks) EGA 
O World (690) - A fascinating electronic database Of world geography, 

LJ Magic Crayon (691) - Allows children to explore and experiment wflh co4^fS add sJwipes, EGA m<5,i'>'^ 



APPLICATIONS 



a Trip Planner (766) - Plan a detailed tnp with this fantastic computerized road map. 

L) PC-Musician (789) - Compose, edit, and play back your musical creations, 

:il Astrology (802) • Let this program teach you about Western and Eastern astrology, 

_l Earth Walcfi (830) ■ A real-time, moving Mercatot Projection map of Ihe world, Crj A 

J Lotto! (832) - See i( your computer can help you win the lollery 

J Resume Shop (552) - This program helps you write a botrer, more effective resunw 

J SUMS Management Systefn (860) - Analyzes your stress and leaches you to recognize warning signs. 

Q WIidoiTi of the Ages (863*385} > Over SQOO quotes from history s greatest minds. - : ' -^ 



GRAPHICS 



J Draft Choice (509) • An excelleni menu*dnven CAD program with optional mouse support. 

J Finger Paint [521) - Use your keyboard (or a mouse) lo draw great color pkctures, criA 

J PC-Key Draw (542-545) - Powerful design program Works with keybcard or mouse, ii cli;,k;,l HD CGA 

J VGA Paint (548) ■ A super-duper paini program — only for you lucky people wi;h ,GA 5T2K 

J fianner/Sign Makers (556) - Prmi your own banners and sfgns on your Epson contpatlbte prinler. 

U On Side (591) - Pr.rls spreacsheeis cr anything) sideways, 

J Print Master Graphics (593,5&4) - A large collection of clip-art for Print Master users, i2 disksi 

LI PrintShop Graphics (596,597) - A great collection of graphics for PnntShop. ; :; ..m, 

J CompuShow(507) ■ A "antastic giapncs viewing utihly for GIF. PCX. MacPaint, RLE. and more, 

J Cars (480) - Several .GIF oream cars, including a Porsche and Corvette, FGAor VGA 

J WlldtJfe (491) ■ Beautiful Wildlife pictures m GIF formal V i>i 

J Planes (493) - Several pictures of planes (mostly warp I anas) m ,GIF formal, EGA or VGA 

U VGA Coltectlon t (495-499) - A great collection of GIF pictures for VGA systems only, \z> diSksi VGA 

3 VGA Collection It (47S-479) - More beautiful pictures for inose of you with VGA systems. iS d sitss VGA 

Lt VGA Cotlectkwi ftl (5OO>»04) - Another collection of excellent GIFs fof your enpyment. (S disks) VGA 




HOME & FAMILY 



J Brother's Keeper (702,703) - Document your family's history wjth this genealogy program, (2 disks) 

3 C.A.R,S, (705) - This program makes it easy to keep a record 0! all your aulo expenses 

□ pf)K - Personal Record Keeper (723) - A system that Iracks a variety 0* your personal info. CGA HD 

a Home Legal Guide (725,726) - A 2 disk set ol legaS forms plus full text of some important statutes, HO 

Q Cash Control (726) - Manage your checking, savings, or charge accounts Ihe fast and easy way. 320K 

U Home Inventory (738) - Keeps a record of all your personal possessions. 

3 Will Kit (771) ' Save artorney's fees by treating your own will valid in all 50 states. 



GAMES 

Q Pyramid Solltsire (920) - Two nice sohiaire games Pyramid Solitaire and Accord<on Sotitaire. 

□ Moraff's Entrap (921) Tnis sogic-based 3-D game combines a challenging puzzle with great graphics, 
3 Rock 'n Roll Trivial Matters (922) - A great tnvia game for rock n roll buffs, 

H Cipher (927) ■ Try to decipher these famous quotations, 

J The Monuments ol Mars! (926}- Explore 20 unique levels filled with puMlas, traps, and creatures, CGA 

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P.O, Box 2302 
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= S^ 



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Circle Reader S«rvicd Number 199 



Personal information manager. I 
must admit that normally I use QEdit 
and view or update a to-do list about a 
dozen times a day. Throughout my 
company, PC Tools Deluxe is the pre- 
ferred program. I use it when I abso- 
lutely must remember an appointment 
and need to be beeped. Otherwise 
QEdit and my Mickey Mouse wall clock 
make do — a hardware/software com- 
bination that cost about $100 total 

Spreadsheet/financial. Qiiatiro 
Pro is my spreadsheet, 1 much prefer 
Wingz, but I don't run Windows 
enough to justify it, and 1 need to ex- 
change Lo/w5-compatible work sheets 
with my co-workers, who are 1-2-S 
jocks, Quattro is quite fast, comes with 
the font and mouse support that I need, 
and has the simple graphics I want, 

Graphics/DTP. Microsoft Word 
is my desktop publishing program, I 
need strong font control and moder- 
ately complex formatting. The for- 
matting must be automated because 
long stretches of the manual must use 
the same layout, and only Word and 
Ventura Publisher give me what I 
need. Since Word is also a word pro- 
cessor, I use it and have completely 
dropped dedicated desktop publishing 
packages. It also costs a few hundred 
dollars less, but Fve been upgrading 
Word since 1985, so that's not of di- 
rect concern to me. 

Programming language. Pro- 
gramming languages are my liveli- 
hood, so my preferences are clear and 
wide-ranging. For systems utilities on 
the PC, nothing can match Turbo Pas- 
cal Professional 6,0, with the fastest 
compiler of all time and a great inte- 
grated environment. For programs 
that need to run in non-PC-compati- 
ble environments, ANSI C is the only 
way to go, I prefer the Borland envi- 
ronments, so I use its C+ + Pro sys- 
tem. Both .ANSI C and C++ come 
with an excellent assembler, good doc- 
umentation, and one of the best de- 
buggers that ever walked the planet. 

For fun, if s a tie between Quick- 
BASIC and Turbo Pascal. Quick- 
BASIC lacks dynamic memor>' 
allocation and strong type checking, 
but its integrated environment is a 
joy. It also has extensible online help 
and a no- wait compiler for the inte- 
grated environment, both of which 
are features that ought to be manda- 
tory' in all compilers. While I generally 
lean toward Turbo Pascal for short 
utilities, QuickBASIC steps into the 
fray as often as not. 

When a program has to be in as- 
sembly language, I edit with QEdit 
and assemble using Borland's TASM, 
which is part of Turbo Debugger and 
Tools, but QuickAssembler*^ online 
help is slowly becoming a permanent 
and welcome part of my life. B 



Products Mentioned 



Aidus PageMaker 4.0, $79500 

Aldus 

41 1 First Ave- S 

Seattle, WA 98104 

(206) 622-5500 

Ami Pro, S495.00 
Lotus Agenda 2.0, $395.00 
Lotus Development 
5600 Glenrfdge Dr. 
Atlanta. GA 30342 



Mickey Mouse Clock, $40.00 
The Disney Store 
3333 Bristol St.. #1849 
Costa Mesa. CA 92626 
(714)979-2920 

Microsoft QulckBAStC 4.5 

S99.00 

Microsoft Windows 3.0 

SI 49.00 

Microsoft Word 5.5 



Quattro Pro 2,0, $495.00 
Turbo C-f + Professional 1.0 

S299.95 

Turbo Debugger and Tools 2.0 

SI 49.95 

Turbo Pascal Professional 6,0 

$299.95 

Borland tnternational 

1 800 Green Hills Rd. 

P.O. Box 660001 

Scotts Valley, CA 95067-0001 



{800)831-9679 


3450.00 


(408)438^5300 


or 


Microsoft 




Lotus Development 


One Microsoft Way 


Quici(en 4.0, $59.95 


55 Cambridge Pkwy, 


Redmond. WA 98052-6399 


Intuit 


Cambridge, MA 02142 


(800) 426-9400 


P.O. Box 301 4 


(800)223-1662 




Menio Park. CA 94026 




The Norton Commander 3,0 


(415)322-0573 


/IflC-hPLUS 7.1, $89.95 


S149.00 




System Enhancement 


Tfie Norton Utilises 5.0 


TBBS 2,18 (single line) 


Associates 


$179.00 


S299.95 


925ClittonAve. 


Symantec 


TBBS 2.1 M (16-iJne multfline) 


Cimon.NJ 07013 


10201 Torre Ave. 


$895,00 


(201)473-5153 


Cupertino, CA 95014-2132 


TBBS 2.1 M (32-lme multiline) 




(800)441-7234 


SI .495.00 


CheX 2.43 




eSoft 


$20.00 (shareware registration) 


PC.Rfe6.0.S149.95 


15200 E. Girard Ave., Ste. 2550 


Rich Young 


Button Ware 


Aurora, CO 80014 


6060 Ashley PL 


P.O. Box 96058 


(303)699-6565 


Goletta.CA 931 17-1773 


Bellevue, WA 98009 




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(600) 528-8866 


re/fx3.12 

$40.00 (5V4-inch disks) 


dBASE/V 1.1 


PC Paintbrust) /V 1.0, S99.95 


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S795,O0 


PCPaintbrusfilVPIus^.O 


Exis 


SI 75.00 (upgrade from 


$199.95 


PO. Box 130 


dBASE III Plus) 


ZSoft 


West H ill. ON 


dB4SEW/P/us 1.1, S695.00 


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Canada Ml E4R4 


Ashton-Tate 


Marietta, GA 30067 


(416)289^641 


20101 Hamilton Ave. 


(404)428-0008 




Torrance. CA 90509 




furiboCalc 


(800)227-4866 


PC roo/sDe/uxe 6.0, $149.00 


$40.00 (shareware registration) 




$40.00 (upgrade) 


P & M Software 


400$ 


Central Point Software 


3104 E. Camelback Rd., #503 


$35.00 (disk only) 


1 5220 NW Greenbrier Pkwy. 


Phoenix. AZ 85016 


S50.00 (disk and manual) 


Ste. 200 


(602)285-9914 


J. P. Software 


Beaverton, OR 97006 




P.O. Box 1470 


(800)888-8199 


^ntura Publisher 3.0, S895.00 


E.Arlington. MA 021 74 




Vtentura Software 


(617)646-3975 


PKZiP'iA 


15175 Innovation Dr. 




$25.00 (shareware registratron) 


San Diego. CA 92128 


HyperPad 2,0, $149.95 


$50.50 (registration and 


(800)822-8221 


HyperPad Browser 


manual) 




S99.95 (registered users) 


PKWARE 


fcV//dcaf/ 2.55, $129.00 


Brightbiil- Roberts and Co. 


9025 N. Deer wood Dr. 


Mustang Software 


1 20 E. Washington St.. Ste. 421 


Brown Deer. Wl 53223 


P.O. Box 2264 


Syracuse, NY 13202 


(414)352-3670 


Bakersfield. CA 93303 


(315)474-3400 


ProComm Plus 2.0, $119.00 


(805)395-0223 


HYPE Uf//Wes, Free 


Datastorm Technologies 


Wingz 1Ja, S499.00 


Hyperkineiix 


P.O. Box 1471 


Informix Software 


666W.BakerSt..Ste.405 


Columbia. MO 65205 


4100BohannonDr. 


Costa Mesa, CA 92626 


(314)443-3282 


Menlo Park, CA 94025 


(714)668-9234 


pLfb//sh/f.M. 2, $249.95 


(415)926*6300 


Info Select 1.12 


Timev/orks 


WordSfar 6.0, $495.00 


S99.95 


444 Lake Cook Rd. 


WbrdStar International 


S49.95 (upgrade from Tornado) 


Deerfield.lL 60015-4919 


201 Alameda del Prado 


Micro Logic 


(708)948-9206 


P.O. Box 6113 


P.O. Box 70 




NovatO, CA 94948-9802 


Hackensack, NJ 07602 


Q£d/Mdi^aficGd2.1,S54.95 


(800)227-5609 


(201)342-6518 


SemWare 






4343 Shallowford Rd., Ste. C-3 


XyWrlie 3.56, $445.00 


Ust 


Marietta, GA 30062-5003 


Xyquest 


$20.00 (shareware registration) 


(404)641-9002 


44 Manning Rd. 


\%rnon Buerg 




Bilferica. MA 01821 


139 White Oak Or. 




(508)671-0888 


Petaluma,CA 94952 







92 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

FOR 

COMPUTE DISK 

SUBSCRIBERS 

COMPUTE offers two different disk 
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SharePak disi< and PC Disk. SharePak 
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price of $59.95 for sy^-inch disi<s 
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numbered monttis and has a sub- 
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MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 93 




you know the incredible 
learning a foreijm 



^ Whether for travel, 
business or entertain- 
ment, conversing in a foreign 
aguage will open up whole new 
worlds to you. And now there's a 
method that makes learning a 
;n language simpien Pain- 
And faster than you ever 
thought possible. The first 15 
tapes of this package are the 
ver)^ same tapes used by the 
US. State Department to 
train career diplomats. 
Tiiey'ce tried and proven 
effective. But it s the sec- 
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die latest European 
learning techniques that 
make this system so spe- 
cial This marriage of two 
teaching. concepts liter- 
ally gives you two 
courses in one ...the 
best of both 
worlds In 
inguage 
nstruction. 








FRENCH 

.^1 cassdtes 
plus triple bonus 

$245.00 


^H 


^m 1 




m F 


1 






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F 


SPA-MSH 

us triple bonus 

$245.00 


GERMAN 

pliL^ triple honus 

J245.00 


ITALIAN 

plus lrip[(? bom 

$245.00 



BREAKTHROUGHS in language technology 

by European learning rescarciier Dr. Georgi 
Lozanov are ilic basis of the remarkable 

Accelerated Learning 
Unguage Series. 
The series is so effective^ 
we guarantee youl! be 
hearing, i*eading, under- 



"American managers with 
language skills open more 
doors/* 

mil ^reetptmial EiMmal 
July 25. 1988 



Standing and beginning to converse in your 
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This unique new system links the left side 
of the bi-aln (language and logic) with the 
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the words to a song ^""^^^ 

with little or no effort. sequence ISy 
Accelerated Learning Analysis 

u.ses Baroque music 

to "un-stress" 

the learn tng process. 

Boost your memory 

with music. 




"(the superleanimg method 
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are eximordinan'." 

Praf, Lawrence Hull 
Hamvil I iiiveratv 



I lave you ever wondered w^hy you can re- 
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conscious effort? Music stimulates right brain 



^ 



^ 



A * Jou>el - tc Gdi'-tile A-lou-ct - te. A - lou-et • tt Jc ic plu^me-fal. 

activity. Speech is a left brain activit}'. Wien the 

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your memory is much 

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'Tm 52 years old, and if 
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Joseph A, Kordick 
Ford Motof Company 



TWo laaguage courses in one. 

Utilizing these untapped mental capacities of your 
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To correctly converse in a 
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"1 decided to concentrate on 
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Industrialist 



Ordering Information 

CALL TOLL FREE WITH YOUR CREDIT CARD ORDER 



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Or send your check, money order 
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350 W. COLORADO BOULEVARD 
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#DISGOffRY 



PATHWAYS 



STEVEN 



A N Z O V I N 



Mars, the red planet, looms 
ahead. Flying at spacecraft 
speed above the orange and 
umber terrain, you swoop past 
awesome Martian landmarks. Ahead 
is the vast canyon of the Valles Marin- 
eris, 3000 miles long and more than 
3000 feel deep. Towering above the 
Martian plains is Olympus Mons, the 
tallest volcano in the solar system. Its 
base is the size of Nebraska; its peak 
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mosphere. Beyond are endless seas of 
red dust, alien fields of stone, dustings 
of carbon dioxide frost that evaporate 
at the first touch of the cold sun. 

No, this isn't a scene from the 
1950s science fiction film TheAngn^ 
Red Planet. IX'sMars: The Movie, an 
amazingly accurate virtual reality sim- 
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ated by NASA's Jet Propulsion 
Laboratory. The JPL used actual elec- 
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probes to create a two-minute 
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mountain range out of clay, though a 
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Lighting, shadows, colors, and 
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surfaces — impact craters, soil, vegeta- 
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vincing. In Mars: The Movie, JPL 
used image enhancement techniques 
to bring out small details, smooth the 
edges of landscape features, and seam- 
lessly stitch together the edges of ad- 
joining maps. All this makes Mars: 
The Movie and its JPL siblings, in- 
cluding Miranda: The Movie (Mir- 
anda is a moon of Uranus) and Earth: 



The Movie, too real not to believe. 
And believability is the true test of 
any simulation. (You can get a video 
copy of these and other simulations 
for $19.95 from Video Publishing 
Group, 5055 NW i59th Street, Mi- 
ami, Horida 33014; 305-621-7283). 




While virtual reality landscape 
simulations can be art in their own 
right, they are also useful for line-of 
sight surveys, previews of large-scale 
civil and architectural engineering 
projects, environmental impact fore- 
casting, exploration of exotic envir- 
onments, and other applications 
involving sites too hazardous, diffi- 
cult, or costly to visit in person. But 
suppose you simply wanted to make 
My Town: The Movie. Interestingly, 
you don't need a JPL supercomputer 
to do the job. In fact, all that's re- 
quired is an Amiga 500 (one of the 
lowest-cost home computers around) 
and a program called Vista, from Vir- 
tual Reality Laboratories (234 1 Gana- 
dor Court, San Luis Obispo, Cali- 
fornia 93401; 805-545-8515; $99.95). 
Like the big-time 3~D landscape simu- 
lation software, Vista can take 2-D 
elevation and contour data and con- 
vert it into a 3-D virtual reality that 
can be viewed from any angle. To 
make a fly-by movie, you move the 
viewpoint along a path and save pic- 



tures at set intervals to an animation 
program or VCR. 

Vista can generate 4 billion frac- 
tal landscapes, but most people are 
using the program to simulate real 
places. Vista accepts the United States 
Geologic Survey's Digital Elevation 
Mapping (DEM) files, which currently 
cover about 40 percent of the country. 
A DEM file contains essential ly the 
same information found in a USGS 
paper contour map, but in database 
form. Getting DEM data into Vista is 
not a task for the faint of heart. Once 
youVe called the USGS to find out 
whether the area you're interested in 
has been digitally mapped, the Survey 
will send you (for a fee) an MS-DOS- 
formatted tape with the relevant 
DEM file. (How many of you have a 
tape drive at home?) Then you*ve got 
to convert it to an Amiga-readable 
format, which requires programming 
skills in C. If you take the time to 
master the file format, you don't 
have to limit yourself to USGS 
data — you can enter any topographic 
values you like. So, for example, you 
could create a 3-D map of your back- 
yard, assuming you want to go out 
and measure all the bumps in the 
lawn. It doesn't have to be a land- 
scape — one user has adapted Vista 
for molecular modeling. For nonpro- 
grammers. Virtual Reality Labs is 
trying to make things easier by offer- 
ing data disks with the most-request- 
ed DEM files, plus other goodies like 
3-D projections of the latest Magellan 
probe maps of Venus. 

Reality simulation in your own 
home — is it a more practical use of 
your time than balancing your check- 
book? According to Susan Woeltjen, 
one of the developers of Vista, the 
U.S. military thinks it's practical. Ap- 
parently, the Department of Defense 
has been looking into Vista as an en- 
gine for cheap, fast simulations of 
Iraqi terrain. If s interesting to con- 
template that the success of a multi- 
billion dollar military operation in the 
Middle East might just depend on the 
virtual reality created with a $600 
computer and a $99 software package. [3 



96 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 






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RAD GAD 



CAD HAS HELPED BUILD OUR BRIDGES AND FLY US TO THE MOON. 
WHAT DOES IT OFFER THE NEXT GENERATION? 



GAD? In the schools? Educators who have en- 
joyed success with innovative computer simula- 
tions like Voyage ofMimi, Balance of Power, or 
The Oregon Trail shouldn't be surprised to hear 
that computer-aided design (CAD) is moving into the 
schools, starting in kindergarten. 

CAD was once the exclusive province of engineers 
and architects. But the aerospace, machining, and elec- 
tronics industries now share this versatile technology with 
such diverse fields as clothing and interior design. Even 
archaeologists have found a use for this tool in the recon- 
struction of ancient ruins. 

Since CAD use is so widespread in the working 
worid, its use is coming to be seen as a basic skill, as im- 
portant to conceptualizing as English is to communicating. 
Kids are discovering that design work can be as com- 
petitive and fun as videogames. Teachers are finding all 
kinds of new ways to put CAD to work in helping students 
conceptualize, organize, manipulate, and learn. 

Canned CAD 

What kind of CAD program is right for young people? 
Since the introduction of the CAD concept begins early, a 
"canned" CAD program such as Stickybear TownbuHder 
(Optimum Resources) is used. This program lets a child as 
young as five construct his or her own town. When the 
town is completed, the student can drive around in a 
simulated car to get the feel of the layout. 

Slightly older children get into design with Car Build- 
er {OpXimnm Resources). If s organized similarly to 
Stickybear TownbuHder, Car Builder challenges students 
to select components from a database until they have as- 
sembled a simulated car. Then the car can be modified 
and tested for wind drag and overall performance. 

Junior high and high schoolers are crazy about Sim- 



City (Maxis Software). Just about everybody seems to like 
it This award-winning software has been a bestseller for 
months. Based on the American Urban Architecture mod- 
el, SimCity zWov^s students to construct a city in an area 
ten miles on a side. In their simulated cities, students can 
bulldoze land and place roads, parks, airports, police and 
fire stations, stadiums, factories, and residential areas. 

Once the city has been constructed, the user must act 
as mayor and deal with all the classic problems of a grow- 
ing city, including not only predictable urban headaches 
such as tax fiight and pollution, but also disasters like 
earthquakes and fires and even a marauding sea monster 

Learning to Love Design 

But how do the kids react to these simulations? Do they 
approach the software as something challenging and fun, 
or as just one more boring school activity? 

The best person to ask is a teacher. David Ellison is a 
long-time user of introductory CAD programs as a com- 
puter coordinator and classroom teacher at Barnard- 
White Middle School in Union City, California. 

"Initially, many of the students balk at the CAD pro- 
grams when they discover that more thought is required 
than is needed with most videogames," he comments. 
'*Once they gel into it, however, they start to appreciate 
the value of the computer as a design tool. We even have 
contests to see what team can design the fastest car or the 
most efficient city." 

Employing a more open-ended format, Lockart Mid- 
dle School (grades 6-8) in Oriando, Florida, has students 
use a CAD program cA\td AutoSketch (Autodesk) to de- 
sign monorail trains and then build physical models based 
on their CAD designs. 

AutoSketch allows them to create perfectly symmetri- 
cal drawings that can be moved, stretched, copied, mir- 1> 




Wr '":C^^^^^^ 



MICHAEL C. PERKINS AND KELLY RIVERS 



MAY 1991 COMPUTE 90 



rored, scaled, or rotated as needed in a 
two-dimensional format. Using CAD, 
the Lockart students' drawings are 
cleaner and more accurate than hand 
renderings. As a result, they develop 
more successful physical prototypes of 
their trains. 

Eighth graders at San Jose Mid- 
dle School in Novato, California, will 
be using the same kind of CAD soft- 
ware to learn drafting. The plan, how- 
ever, is to extend these skills into 
subjects beyond drafting. Principal 
Nancy Cooley says, "'Our goal for the 
1990-1991 school year is to develop a 
more interdisciplinar>' approach in 
which, for example, a social studies 
class studying ancient civilizations 
could use CAD software to draft up a 
working model of a Sumerian city and 
its various structures." 

On a high school level, two 
schools in Ohio — Perry- High School 
in Massillon and the Libby Skill 
Center in Toledo— have been using 
a more complex design program, 
AutoCAD (Autodesk). 

At Perry, students learn the CAD 
software by copying shop documents; 
then they practice creating architec- 
tural, electrical, and other types of 
drawings. The second year of CAD in- 
volves real-world drafting assign- 
ments that include three-dimensional 
drawings, shading, and isometric 
views. 

At Libby, students work with 
flow charts and assembly drawings to 
develop work-cell models for use in 
industrial automation. 

Students at both schools are as- 
sisted in getting summer jobs and in- 
ternships where they can put their 
CAD skills to use. 

Synergy 

Taking a different approach, tenth 
graders at Sir Francis Drake High 
School in San Anselmo, California, 
like their counterparts at San Jose 
Middle School in Novato, will be ex- 
ploring the virtues of computer-aided 
design through an innovative new 
program. The program, the Marin 
Education Collaborative (MEC), was 
organized by Autodesk, whose com- 
pany headquarters is in SausaUto» 
California. 

Rather than working in a strict 
engineering and drafting context like 
the high school students in Ohio, stu- 
dents in the program at Sir Francis 
Drake work with data from their biol- 
ogy, math, and English studies. 

One proposed project involves a 
study of the evolution of costume de- 
sign. Students using CAD software 
would learn how to create costumes in 
much the same way modern clothing 
designers use computers to construct 
and generate garment patterns. 




AutoCAD is professional designware. 

Students then study changes in 
costume and fashion in various his- 
torical periods and cultures in the 
light of physical environmental fac- 
tors (for example, colder weather in 
Northern Europe or desert climates in 
the Near East). Once the study has 
been completed, students will draw 
upon their English skills to write a re- 
port on the project and make an oral 
presentation. 

Another proposed project in- 
volves a study of water conservation 
at Sir Francis Drake High School and 
in the San Anselmo community at 
lar^e. Students will use CAD software 
to re-create and study the current lay- 
out of water pipes. They'll use anima- 
tion software to study the flow. The 
students seek to discover how much 
water is being used, whether the water 
is being used in the most economical 
way, and how the use of water can be 
improved. 

Ron Fortunato will be serving as 
a consultant to the MEC program. 
Currently he's a technology consultant 
with the Glenbrook High School Dis- 
trict in Glenview, Illinois. As coordi- 
nator of the NORSTAR Student 
Research Institute in Norfolk, Virgin- 
ia, he helped develop the first space- 
flight program run by high school 
students. 

According to Fortunato, the main 
goal of the MEC programs is *'to cre- 
ate an educational environment in 
which students are using technol- 
ogy—including CAD— to generate 
new data that can ultimately be used 
to solve real-world problems." 

Fortunato will also be assisting 
the MEC programs to develop ties to 
NASA's Ames Research Center in 
Mountain View, California, and the 



Christa McAuliffe Center at Stanford 
University. 

Barbara Granicher, principal at 
Sir Francis Drake, characterizes the 
program's multi subject, interdisci- 
plinary approach as an experiment in 
thematic problem solving, rather than 
a strict computer program limited 
solely to drafting projects. Other 
CAD-relaied ideas include projects fo- 
cused on urban development, trans- 
portation, and pollution control. 

The project instructors hope to 
bring in other computer applications 
such as database, word-processing, 
and desktop-publishing software in 
order to store the data generated by 
the projects, to produce the reports, 
and to serve as graphic aids in the pre- 
sentation of the results. 

In the Material World 

Uhimately, the use of CAD by kids 
can achieve a number of practical 
goals. It helps all students better un- 
derstand the use of computers in the 
everyday working world, and it helps 
them discover aptitudes in their own 
use of the computer as an instrument 
of design. 

Student designers should learn 
CAD for the same reasons budding 
journalists must learn word-process- 
ing skills and future fmancial analysts 
must learn the power of the spread- 
sheet. As students decide to become 
architects, engineers, molecular chem- 
ists, city planners, cartographers, and 
designers of all kinds, they must learn 
to use the appropriate CAD program. 

Though school computing was 
once looked down upon as the exclu- 
sive province of nerds and dweebs, it 
is now becoming a basic necessity for 
all students to have computer skills. H 



Stickybear TownbuHder 

and Car Builder 
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SimCity 
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100 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



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#ENTEII1AINIIII[NT 



GAMEPLAY 



ORSON 



SCOTT 



CARD 



Try as they might, gamewrights 
don't have complete control over 
the way you experience their 
games. As more and more games 
rely on nonstandard devices — some- 
thing besides the keyboard, the screen, 
and the hard disk — your enjoyment 
depends more and more on the right 
tools. 

But where to turn for guidance? 
Where can you find the right tool that 
will bring life to the game^ without in- 
terfering with the quality of the play? 
Ask another game player — like me. 
Here's my guide for the game player's 
indispensable toolkit. 

Sticks, Fve used a lot of joysticks 
over the years, and for a long time I 
thought there was no such thing as a 
good PC joystick. Once you've played 
with that tough old bird, the original 
Atari joystick, with its firm resistance 
and delicious tactile feedback, those 
wimpy little toothpick joysticks you're 
forced to use on IBM-related ma- 
chines are faintly disgusting. 

Does any game actually use the 
IBM-joystick's capability of register- 
ing how far you've moved the stick? I 
don't think so. They only register the 
same things that the Atari stick report- 
ed so cleanly and simply — up, down, 
left, right, or center. So we put up with 
all that wimpiness just so the IBM 
stick can report information that no 
game ever uses. 

Despite my dislike of the whole 
idea of the IBM joystick, I'm glad to 
report that somebody actually makes 
a good one. Epyx's hand-held joystick, 
the 500XJ, is the most comfortable, 
responsive joystick in the IBM 
world — and it's the only one that be- 
longs in the same league as the Atari 
stick. 

Balls. What the IBM joystick's 
designers didn't anticipate was the lit- 
tle box with the ball in it — the mouse 
and the trackball. When we want sub- 
tle information about how far and 
how fast, that's what we use. 

Fve tried a lot of mice, and for 
the sheer feel of it, there's no compari- 
son to the Microsoft mouse. It cradles 
in the palm of your hand, it responds 



beautifully to natural and easy wrist 
movements, and when it gets dirty 
and binds up, you just pop off the col- 
lar, drop out the ball, and blow the 
box clean. 

There is something better, but I 
don't think it*s made its way to the PC 
world yet. On my Amiga I use the op- 
tical Boing Mouse from GfxBase 
(408-262-1469). It doesn't give quite 
the tactile feedback of the Microsoft 
mouse, but it has the advantage of 
never getting dirty and binding up hke 
a shopping cart wheel. 




On my upstairs machine, the 
portable that I use for my writing, I 
need a mouse for a few jobs. (Well, all 
right, for a few monochrome games.) 
But the way I use my desk doesn't 
work well with a mouse. I surround 
myself with the piles of books and 
notes that I'm using for current pro- 
jects; I can't afford to keep a mouse 
pad's worth of space free and clear. 

So I decided to buy a trackball. I 
first tried the most traditional de- 
sign — big ball in the middle, buttons 
above it. It was awflil. What was I 
supposed to do, move the ball with 
my palm? 

My next try was a nice hefty pool- 
ball-sized item with big buttons fram- 
ing the ball on either side. It was 
much better, but my fingers just aren't 
dexterous enough to move the ball 
with speed and assurance. 

Then I bought Logitech's Track- 
man, and Fm happy. This is the track- 
ball that has you move the ball with 



your thumb, while your fingers rest on 
the buttons off to the side. Logitech's 
promos aren't hype; they're true: The 
thumb really is more dexterous than 
the fingers. With the ballistics feature 
turned on, I can move all over the 
screen with simple, quick, intuitive 
movements. It still isn't as comfort- 
able and easy as a mouse, but where a 
mouse won't do, the Trackman will. 

Sounds » I always figured that 
when I wanted good sound, I'd use the 
Amiga. But then it became clear that 
too many good games with good 
sound were being put out for PCs 
only, and I wanted to hear them. So I 
sprang for the bucks to buy the Ro- 
land MT-32. The only trouble is its 
memory conflict with the Racei laser 
drive (a rewritable optical disk drive) 
I use for backup. When faced with 
that choice — well, backup comes 
before play. 

When I got my 486, 1 moved the 
MT-32 into it and fell in love. It 
sounds great. In the meantime, I 
bought an Ad Lib board for my 386 
machine, and it had no conflicts with 
the laser drive. While it isn't quite as 
lush-sounding as the MT-32, it still 
sounds great — and many games make 
good use of both sound boards, either 
for sound effects or for background 
music. (Both boards require you to 
buy a simple amplifier and a pair of 
speakers.) 

There are some peculiarities, at 
least on my systems. When Fm play- 
ing Railroad Tycoon, there are times 
when the Ad Lib board doesn't get the 
message to turn off a particular sound 
effect, so I have to spend several min- 
utes hstening to a whine or a hiss 
before I can get the thing to shut 
down, Ver>' unpleasant. 

The MT-32, on the other hand, is 
consistent: Every time it's first used, 
no matter where I have the volume 
set, it turns on at full blast and calms 
down only after I've fiddled with 
the knob. 

But hey, once you've played with 
either sound board installed, playing 
without it feels like watching a movie 
with the soundtrack turned off. B 



102 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 






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J he fog was so heavy that the crew of 
the SS Carlton could barely make out 
the stern of their ship. Yet despite the 
fog, the Carlton and 34 other cargo ships 
were headed single-file out of the harbor at 
Hvalfiord, Iceland. They were moving toward 
the Soviet coast with $700 million worth of 
war materials. 

The Carlton had been unlucky ever since 
she left Philadelphia several months earlier on 
Friday the thirteenth. She was towed back 
from her previous attempt to cross the Barents 
Sea as a result of a near-miss air attack. That's 
when her gunner managed to shoot down a 
British Sea Hurricane aircraft. Now she was 
headed back out as part of the most disastrous 
convoy of the war, Convoy PQ-1 7. > 



RICHARD SHEFFIELD 



MAY 1991 COMPUTE 105 




Yon ulll if yoirrt* cm a cniisi- 
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IWl Ospn vUr. S-n.' 102 



It seemed that no one was very 
keen on the Iceland-to-Russia con- 
voys, from the British Admiralty, who 
called the operation **unsound," to 
Seaman James Atkins, who would 
write, "We were loaded with . . . 450 
tons of high explosive, loaded fore, 
aft, and amidships: they were not tak- 
ing any chances on our getting 
through to Russia." 

But Roosevelt, who provided 
most of the material and ships, and 
Stalin, who needed that material to 
stop the German advance along the 
Russian front, put enormous pressure 
on Churchill to get the convoy mov- 
ing, though they had intelligence that 
the German navy was cooking up 

106 COMPUTE 



something special for PQ-17. 

Il was probably too much good 
intelligence that led the British to be- 
lieve that the convoy was in immi- 
nent danger of attack by a strong 
surface force. Believing they were out- 
gunned, the British gave the disas- 
trous order to withdraw the covering 
warships and disperse the convoy. 

Starting Over 

But what if things had been different? 
Two new simulation games let you set 
up PQ- 1 7 and see how it plays out. 
In fact, WolfPack from Brederbund 
and Action Stations from Conflict 
.Analytics let you set up just about 
any scenario, real or imagined. 



The ability to make up your own 
scenarios finally frees the game player 
from the designer's view of how the 
game should be played. Canned sce- 
narios are nice, but once you've 
played them once or twice, the game 
starts to lose some of its zip. When 
you can make up new scenarios and 
rewrite history, a game can remain in- 
teresting almost indefinitely. 

With WolfPack and Action Sta- 
tions, you can cover both ends of the 
spectrum when il comes to scenario 
building. The Mission Construction 
Set in WolfPack is mouse driven, 
highly graphic, and easy lo use; but it's 
also rather shallow in detail. The Sce- 
nario Builder with Action Stations, 
however, is complex and highly de- 
tailed, but it's more difficult to use. 

Though the Germans' plan was 
lo destroy PQ-17 with a surface force, 
they also had 1 1 U-boais (code-named 
the Ice Devil pack) in the area to track 
the convoy. What if the Germans had 
decided lo attack the convoy early 
with Ice Devil instead of tracking? 
You can easily set up and play this 
scenario with WolfPack. The only 
problem is the size of the forces and 
convoy. WolfPack tends to slow down 
when a large number of ships are 
used. Fortunately, this is easily coun- 
tered by reducing the forces on both 
sides by half. 

Actually building the scenario is 
very' easy. Using a point-and<lick op- 
eration, you just pick a patch of ocean 
and populate it with ships. The con- 
voy of 20 ships is set up to follow one 
ship as a leader, so you only need to 
plot the course for that one ship. 
Around the convoy are placed seven 
destroyers, either in repeating patrol 
routes, which move with the convoy, 
or in advance positions on their own. 
Then it's just a matter of placing the 
six U-boals and picking their captains. 
This feature lets you choose how the 
U-boats will function when you're not 
controlling ihem. Some captains are 



ANATOMY OF A BLUNDER 

If you're interested in learning more 
about Convoy PQ-17, here are two ex- 
cellent books on the subject: 

The Destruction of Convoy PQ-U, by 
David Irving (St. Martin's, New York, 
1989). This heavily researched book 
was initially banned by the British Admi- 
ralty, since it explained their blunders in 
great detail. A superb operational 
history. 

A Cold Corner of Hell: The Story of the 

Murmansk Convoys 1941-194 5, by 
Robert Carse (Doubleday, New York, 
1969). The complete story of the Ice- 
land-to-Russia convoys, from inception 
to completion, with a large section on 
PQ-17. 



MAY 1991 




SW0CH 



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Actual Screens from MS -DOS Version 




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Bane of the Cosmic Forge raises and redefines 
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To order: Visit a Dealer or call 1 (800) 447-1230 



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Wolf Pack lets you re-create realistic sub battles. 



relentless attackers, and others won't 
attack at all 

Put the U-boats on an intercept 
course with the convoy and start the 
action. Once engaged, you can lake 
control of any U-boat in your group 



or watch them operate on their own. 
Though the setup is easy, there 
isn't a lot of detail that can affect the 
outcome, WolfPack makes no pro- 
vision for selling the level of visi- 
bility or sea state. And the convoy 



Das Boot 

Richard Sheffield 



Das Boot puts you in command of a Ger- 
man Type VII U-boat, the scourge of the At- 
lantic during World War jf. Type VII boats 
were responsible for sinking millions of tons 
of Allied shipping. Had they been used prop- 
erly and in greater numbers, they might have 
affected the outcome of the war. 

The name Das Boot comes as a pro- 
motional tie-in with the book (provided free 
with the game) and movie of the same 
name. But it should be made clear that 
there is no attempt made in the game to re- 
create the action in either. 

Learning a game like this is usually 
very difficult, what with all the various sta- 
tions and moving around in the boat. But 
Das Boot has an excellent training mode 
that lets you operate each battle station in 
an arcadelike combat sequence with plenty 
ot targets. In the training mode, you can 
use the antiaircraft gun against Allied 
planes, shoot the deck gun, make surface 
and submerged torpedo attacks, maneuver 
through minefields, and practice sub-versus- 
sub warfare. The practice sessions are 
scored to let you know how well you did. 

After a little practice you are ready for 
your command and one of the five mis- 
sions. From the Arctic to Gibraltar to the 
North Atlantic to Norway to the Bay of Bis- 
cay, you'll find no shortage of enemy con- 
tacts. Allied bombers are a constant threat. 
There are three levels of difficulty, and the 
introductory level is definitely recommend- 
ed for new players. You can further fine- 
tune the difficulty using the Historical 
Accuracy selections. Torpedo per- 
formance, on-board repairs, and new- 



equipment introduction can be tailored to 
make your mission easier or more difficult 

The game fully supports 256-color 
VGA and does present some Interesting 
graphics. But they fail to take full advantage 
of this high-powered video adapter by 
using digitized images of enemy ships as 
do some of the other sub simulations. 
Sound-board support includes both Ad Lib 
and SoundBlaster and is well used. The 
mouse interface also works well. Gameplay 
was satisfactory, but I had several system 
lockups and a recurring bug: The bottom 
portion of my screen woul6 not paint until I 
moved the mouse back and forth over it. 

Actually, the biggest problem with this 
game is what is left out. What's there works 
pretty well but seems incomplete. My big- 
gest complaint is the lack of a Save Game 
feature. With the ability to call for a Miich 
cow resupply sub, some of these missions 
can go on for hours. Asking the player to 
complete them in one sitting is just not real- 
istic, and forcing him or her to scuttle the 
sub to quit in the middle is downright mean. 
Also missing is a campaign/career mode 
along with promotions or medals. It would 
have been great to see how victories at sea 
affect the ground war as you sever the Al- 
lied supply lines. The manual could use 
some v^rork as well. 

The work completed on Das Boot is 
well done, but she seems to have been 
launched a bit prematurely. Until a few 
more hatch doors are installed, I'm afraid 
that she will leak rather badly when com- 
pared to other World War II sub 
simulations. 



doesn't change course or disperse 

once the attack starts. 

Call to Action 

Action Stations, on the other hand, 
presents a much more balanced sur- 
face battle — which the Germans had 
code-named The Knight's Move. Ac- 
tually, convoy PQ-1 7 is one of the sce- 
narios that comes with the game. This 
turns out to be a good thing, since 
building the battle from scratch is 
quite a lengthy and complicated pro- 
cess. Very little is overlooked in the 
building process. The details include 
sea state, wind direction and speed, 
sea direction and speed, day and night 
visibility, time of day, and optional 
storms and squalls. .And that's before 
you ever plot your first ship. 

There are also quite a few details 
to fill in for each ship you include, but 
the most complicated process is plac- 
ing the ships on the map. Instead of 
pointing to where you want the ship 
to be on the map, you provide x,y co- 
ordinates without even seeing the 
map. It's best to follow the manual's 
advice and first plot the whole thing 
out on graph paper. 

Because PQ-1 7 is one of the 30 
scenarios included with Action Sta- 
tions, it's much easier to use the Edit 
function to change a few things in the 
way the scenario is set up. The scenar- 
io comes set up with two German bat- 
tle groups placed together, attacking 
the convoy from the south. Set up this 
way, the British must hold off the 
Germans until the covering cruiser 
force can arrive from the north. Play- 
ing this way, I got an even battle with 
heavy losses on both sides. 

But when I play what if and use 
an alternate German plan of an envel- 
oping attack, things shift a little to the 
Germans. In this setup, the German 
force that's positioned around the bat- 
tleship Tirpitz comes in from the 
north. Before it can attack the convoy, 
it engages the British covering force. 
By staying at long range, the Tirpitz 
can keep this force occupied while the 
Second Battle Group, consisting of the 
'* pocket battleships" Luizow and Ad- 
miral Scheer, attacks the convoy and 
destroyers with 1 1 -inch guns. 

You can't add or remove ships 
with the Edit program, but a program 
on the optional Utilities disk will let 
you do this. Using the Swap-Add pro- 
gram, you can really start to play what 
if What if the Bismark wasn't sunk in 
1 941 and was available for The 
Knight's Move? What if the convoy 
had twice as many torpedo-carrying 
destroyers or a King George V-class 
battleship? The possibilities and re- 
play value of the game are endless. 

Scenario builders are becoming 
so popular that they're almost a must 



108 COMPUTE 



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Product List 

Here are the products used by Richard Sheffield, and some other submarine combat products you might enjoy. 



Action Stations 

Conflict Anatytfcs 

395 Del Monte Center, Ste. 189 

Monterey. CA 93940 

iBM PC and compatibtes, 640K RAM. CGA; 

mouse optional— $49.95 

Utilities dtslc— $12.95 

Ancient Art of War at Sea 

Broderbund Software 
17 Paul Dr. 

San Rafael, CA 94903 
{415)492-3200 

IBM PC and compatibles, 256K RAM. 
graphics adapter; mouse or joystick option- 
al— $44.95 

Apple II version— $44.95 
Macintosh version— $44.95 

Das Boot 

Three-Sixty 
2402 Broadmoor 
BIdg. B. Ste. 201 
Bryan, TX 77802 
(409)776-2187 

IBM PC and compatibles. 640K RAM, CGA 
(1 0-MHz 286 or better with VGA recom- 
mended); Microsoft mouse supported but 
not necessary— $49.95 



40 Great Submarine Stmuiator War 
Adventures 

COMPUTE Books 
324 W. Wendover Ave., Ste. 200 
Greensboro, NC 27408 
(919)275-9809 

Use Silent Service to re-create great World 
War II submarine battles— $14.95 
Harpoon 
Three-Sixty 
2402 Broadmoor 
Bldg. B, Ste. 201 
Bryan, TX 77802 
(409)776-2187 

IBM PC and compatibles, 640K RAM, CGA 
(286 or 386 with EGA or higher recom- 
mended); Microsoft mouse recommend- 
ed— $59.95 
Amiga version— $59,95 
Macintosh version — $59.95 

Hunt for Red October 

Software Toolworks 

60 Leveroni Ct. 

Novate, CA 94949 

(415)883-3000 

IBM PC and compatibles, 51 2K RAM. CGA 

or EGA; mouse supported— $29.95 

Amiga version— $29.95 

Apple II version— $29.95 

Atari ST version— $29.95 

Commodore 64 version — $29.95 

Macintosh version — $29.95 



Pirates! 

MicroProse 

ISOUkefrontDr. 

Hunt Valley MD 21030 

(301)771-1151 

IBM PC and compatibles, 256K RAM, CGA. 

EGA, and Tandy 1 6-coior— $44.95 

Amiga versson — $44.95 

Apple II version — $44.95 

Atari ST version — $44:95 

Commodore 64 version — $44,95 

Macintosh version— $59.95 

Siient Service U 

MicroProse 

180LakefrontDr. 

Hunt Valley, MD 21030 

(301)771-1151 

IBM PC and compatibles, 640K RAM. CGA, 

EGA, VGA, and Tandy 1 6-color; supports 

Ad Lib, SoundBlaster, and Roland sound 

cards— $59.95 

WolfPack 

Broderbund Software 
17 Paul Dr. 

San Rafael, CA 94903 
(415)492-3200 

IBM PC and compatibles, 51 2K RAM, 
graphics adapter; mouse or joystick option- 
al— $54.95 
Amiga version — ^$54,95 



for new military sims of this type. But 

if the idea is to play what if, Td like to 
see the publishers go a step further. 
They could let you set up a battle, sit 
back, and watch the computer play 
both sides. You might even be able to 
watch the action from a number of 
vantage points, as in Ml Tank Platoon, 

Courting Disaster 

So what finally happened to the real- 
life PQ-1 7? After the order to disperse 
the convoy, things got bad in a hurry. 
Without destroyer cover, many ships 
were taken individually by U-boats 
and bombers. A few seaworthy ships 
were beached and abandoned by their 
crews on the first patch of dry land 
they found. In all, 24 ships and 1 53 
Allied seamen were lost. 

The SS Carlton was torpedoed 
the day after the convoy scattered, 
and most of her crew members were 
taken prisoner. The crew's bad luck 
continued when their transport ship 
hit a mine and sank. Having been 
through this before, the crew of the 
Carlton distinguished themselves by 
calmly handing out life preservers to 
the panicked German ground soldiers 
on board and organizing the rescue. 
They were later thanked by the ship's 
captain for saving the lives of hun- 
dreds of men. Q 



caniiPUTE 




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"if s easily explained. You wouldn't buy me a computer, remember?" 



110 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



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Circle Reader Service Nymber 13S 










64/128 VIEW 



TOM NETSEL 



First of all J I'd like to remind all 
user groups to get in contact with 
us if you want to be included in 
this year's listing. We've sent 
forms to all the groups on our world- 
wide list, but you'll be excluded if we 
don't hear from you. If you haven't 
received a form by this time, send us a 
card or letter with your group's name, 
address, and any BBS information. 

Now I'd like to thank aU of you 
who've responded to our Gazette 
Readenhip Survey. This is the fourth 
year we've run such a survey, and 
your feedback provides us with a good 
idea of how we're doing. We appreci- 
ate your taking the time to mail them 
in. Incoming survey forms have 
slowed to a trickle now, so let's take a 
look at what you've told us. 

It comes as no surprise that the 
majority of you own and use a 64 (77 
percent); 42 percent of you own a 128. 
Of those responding, 3 percent own 
an Amiga, 2 percent own a Macin- 
tosh, and 6 percent own an IBM or 
compatible. Of course, many of you 
own more than one computer and 
have an interest in more than one 
brand. More than one of you indicat- 
ed that you own all the brands men- 
tioned in the survey. 

Of those who use a computer at 
work, 57 percent use a PC, 23 percent 
use a 64, 9 percent use a 128, 8 per- 
cent use a Macintosh, and 3 percent 
use an Amiga. 

We were curious about how 
many of you are computer novices 
and how many are veterans. It seems 
5 percent of you bought your 64 with- 
in the past year, and twice that figure 
have two years' experience. The sur- 
vey indicates that 3 percent of you 
bought a 64 the first year it came out. 
The average length of ownership is 4.7 
years. Interestingly enough, ten read- 
ers said they bought a 64 the year 
before it was introduced. Maybe they 
were thinking of the VIC-20. 

We also found that you spend 
quite a few hours each week at your 
keyboards. The average is 1 1.5 hours, 
but a few superusers spend 50 or more 
hours at their computers. One reader 



in Ontario, Canada, spends 20-50 
hours keeping church and election re- 
cords on his 64 and 1 28, teaching chil- 
dren how to program, and working 
with handicapped people. Another 50- 
hour user does everything from play- 
ing games to controlling his home's 
hghting system. Others in the 50-60 
hour category say they keep their 
computers busy doing real estate ap- 
praisals, keeping tax records, operat- 
ing ham radio stations, drawing, 
writing newsletters, and helping in the 
classroom. 

The champion heavyweight user, 
who reportedly spends 60-80 hours 
each week at his 64, says he gets his 
copy of COMPUTE from his father, 
plans to buy another 64 this year, buys 
"a lot" of mail-order software, doesn't 
use Gazette's programs, but might if 
there were more business programs 
offered. 

While most of you are satisfied 
with your computers, 1 8 percent of 
you plan to buy a new one within the 
next year. The PC market will gel the 
biggest share, with 28 percent of you 
moving to an IBM or clone. Brand 
loyalty is reflected by the 45 percent 
who say they'll stick with Commo- 
dore. Of those planning to buy a new 
computer, 16 percent say they'll get 
another 64, and 17 percent plan to up- 
grade to an Amiga. An interesting 
note is that 12.5 percent plan to buy a 
128. Since Commodore no longer 
makes the 1 28, people interested in 
this gone-but-not-foiBOtten computer 
will have to turn to the used-equip- 
ment market to buy the computer 
they want. (Montgomery-Grant ad- 
vertises that it still has 128s in stock, 
but that's the only 128 ad I've seen re- 
cently.) With this much interest in an 
orphaned machine, count on Gazette 
to continue its 128 support. Now's a 
good time to remind programmers 
that we actively solicit 128-speciric 
programs. 

Next month, we'll take a look at 
some of the other information provid- 
ed by the survey, including what you 
want to see in Gazette in the fiiture and 
how you feel about our new format. H 



64/128 View G- 

TOM NETSEL 

Gazette Readership Survey 

results start to pour in. 

News & Notes G- 

EDITORS 

Ultima VI Pick 'n Pile, and 
high-speed data conversions 
for the 64. 

Feedback G- 

EDITORS and READERS 

Painting with Light G- 

PAUL HUGHES 
Use your 64 v^ith painting 
software to unleash your 
artistic talents. 

Reviews G-1 

REVIEWERS 

Micro League Baseball J/, Mega 

Pack, Pro Tennis Tour, Dragon 

Wars 

Machine Language G-1 

JIM BUTTERFIELD 

Beginner BASIC G-S 

LARRY COTTON 

Programmer's Page G-2 

RANDY THOMPSON 

D'lversions G-2 

FRED DTGNAZIO 

TYPE-iN PROGRAMS 

Castalia 

Multi-Reader 

Radonium 

Xtrax 

Loader-Maker 



COMPUTE ©-1 



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SD-40 $549.95 • SD-100 $899.95 • SD-200 $1199.95 



More tnan a repiacemeni for the deskTop, the gate Way offers a unk^ue, streamlined approach to fie 
management under GEOS. With a resizable Note Pad, proportional slider and fuel gauge, the gateWay 
makes it easier to get where you're going. In designing the gateWay, we took a good hard look at the 
deskTop to make sure that none of the functionality would be lost. Then we added feature after feature 

- capabilities that you. the serious GEOS user, have found lacking in the deskTop. At CMD, there's a lot 
more going on than powerful new hardware development • we're creating new ways to use \l 

• FUI three drive support, indudiog sulo-swappjng for appHcalions which will not allow use of drive C. 

• Loadable d[sl« drivers become memory resident and replaces the need for CONFIGURE. 

• Full CMD device support for RAMLInk, RAMDrive and HD hard drives aHowtng for partition sizes up to 16 
Megabytes and Macintosh styl« folders. 

• Supports using the CMD IHD hard drive via parallel for faster hard drive access. 

• RAM disk drivers ailow um of as much avaiiabfe RAM as possible * no longer limiting you to a 1 S4t or 1571 
sized RAM disk. 

• Integrated Control Panet r«plac«s the Preferencss Manager and allows you to contour the gateWay to your 
choice of coiorB, scrMn pattem, printer driver and input driver. 

• Task switching via our Switcher allows you to move Instantly between two applications. 

■ An all new trash can structure which allows you to retrieve multiple files from the trash can. 

• A proportional gadget for moving easily through the directory listing on the Note Pad. 

- Status boxes to indicate files remaining for copy and erase (eatures, plus new file and disk Info boxes. 

• A browse feature which helps in quickly locating files on the currently active device. 

gateway 64 $29.95 * gateWay 128 $29.95 • Both $39.95 • Shipping: UPS Ground $5.00 
Note: The gateWay requires a Commodore G4 or 126, minimum ol ona disk drive, a mouse or Joyskk arvj GEOS 10 lor operaiior. 



gatcWa^ 

A Whole New Way of Working with GEOS 



1 fjios I (iction ; KA^m \ select j 



e8-D€C-9e 95:44 I 



i reiet 



Of 






BCEOSPELL 
5T£XT GRABBER 
5CE0MERCE 
BCE0LA5EJ) 
BPAIMT DRIUERS 
@Hcird Drive 
@6AH DISK 
^iconFonl 

^EPS nSERI 11X1 



s« disl< icon \ 

shutdo'nh' 

open partition OP 




Disli Driu«r 
PifJ! Driver 
UtJt 

i^p(it<U<t 4ot.. 



Ilk IN) M 

Kh Ml 4\sk 

m on 4isk 

ISk m 4\sk 

Mk on i\sk 

^\i or) dislc 

ijh on disk 

1h on disk 

lit on disk 



mmrm..,:, MMmM i Fii^iii 



Lkii 



V6.0 



The Ultimate Disk Drive Enhancement System 

JiffyDOS 64 or SX-64 - $59.95 JiffyDOS 128 or 128D - $69.96 

Eacti system in dudes computer Kernal HOM(s) and one drive ROM. 

Please spedly corrpuier and drive model numbers and serial numbefs when ordering. 

Additional Drive ROlUb • $29.95 each 



OTHER CMD HARDWARE & ACCESSORIES 

Lt. Konnector - Allows use of U Kemal drive mechanisni with CMD HD Syslem $19.95 I 
Disk Drive Power Supply - Heavy Duty Replacememfor t54MI, 1581, & CMO HD $49.95 
J if (y MON M L Monitor - 64 Mode ML and disl^ drive Monitor (requires JitfyOOS) $19.^ 
Serial Cables - Quality 36' Commodore Serial Cables (6 pin D!N male lo male) $3.95 | 

^Shipping (U.S.): U. Konnector $5.00. Power Supply $6.00. JrtfyMON S2.00. Serial Cables $2.00 J 



See all of the CMD 8 bit 




products at 

WORLD OF 
AMIGA 



IN NEW YORK CITY 

Passenger Ship Terminal Pier 90 1 
Booth 121 April 5-7 10am-5pm 



Ordering Information and Shipping Charges 

H D tnd SD Hird Othitti (kntnental US: $25.00 per divQ (UPS ^ourvl), $35.00(^d-Day), $4S.OO (KwVDiy), Canada: $50.00 (AJfinafl). COO b U.S. or^ I 
$4.00 ad^n chared. Fcidigrt pric^ 20Mb. £699.95. 40)«. $399.95, 1D0M), $!2499S, 200Mb. S1 599.95 Postage: S35.00 

Jitty DOS: Add $5.00 pa order {UPS ground), S9.00( End-Day Air), plus $l,SO to APO, FPO, AK. HI. aid Canada, cr SI 5.00lcf over saasadws, | 

NoaJdiianaJ slippng if ordered with any hard drira. COD'slo US onty • addl S4,0O 

Tai: MA rdsidenb add 5% sales tax. 

Tfif m 1 : Wa acoep t VISA, MasterCard , Money Orders, CO. D..., and personal checks (al ow 3 weeks for personal dieck£ lo dear) . Cred t I 

card orders prwide the (oOowng ; Card hddert namo. bling addr ess. ho(nei^«f ok phone, card number, ea ptnBo«i dale and isaing 
* WE VERIFY ALL CflE&ffCARD INFORMATION AfJD PROSECUTE WOIVIOUALS AnEMPTING TO PERPETRATE FRAUD ■ 

Nan: Pncat md tp«fic£Jar«iiul^«t!Bchu^w«ButmtcL QEO&. GEOS ZO, QE€&6tATtp,QBOmm. GfOPAhT, GEOS CONFtGURE. ird GEORAU n rafpittrM 9tiitmmk% »« 

B&^Wf Sfli^O'ki; he.. CRW It t tJ(J«miH at Q^rtd HasetKtv Corrmato™ 6*. Cwiwiado™ IJlH Cam*nixJa» SX-W. Onft;oder» 1360, Conrr.od»t 1 TOO, 17&*. (7M tni C^mfnodutt 
RAMOOS irt ragi$aar*d rurntrlis of CofruEodorg hamiuniJ. A/nigi ii i ii^emmkttZMtnfnoaen^Jifn^i. Uaantsai a i notm vii d Appi« Computf, EM c ■ Qwtefnuk g4 hitrittonal 



CMD / Dr. Evil Labs SIV/FTLink-232 Serial Cartridge 

A Real RS-232 Sartaf Port for the Commodore 64 or 128 

SWlFTUnk-232 gives you alaie RS-232 port with Ihe ability to communicaie al speeds 
from 300 to 38.400 bps, plus true 1 200 and 2400 bps using Hayes compatible modems. 
Experience tbe power oi high speed modems and fast data transfers directly to other 
computers, SWIFTLink plugs easily into your computer's expansion (cartridge) port and 
provides an industry standard IBM-AT style serial port. As an added bonus, SWIFTLink 
comes complete with file transfer software (FTP) plus many popular shareware terminal 
programs such as Desterm 1 28 and NovaTerm for the C-64. SWIFTLink is compatible 
with most hardware devices designed forthe Com modore 64 and 1 28. Note: SWIFTLink 
serial Cable {DB-9 to DB-25) is required for use with most modems. 
SWIFTLink-232 Carlridgo $39,95 SWIFTLink Cablo $9,95 

Shipping: US: $5.00 (Cartridge). $3.00 [CdhlB), $6.00 (Both). Car^da add $4.S0. 



CMD / Dr, Evil Labs SID SYMPHONY Stereo Cartridge 

The Realism of Stereo Sound on your Commodore 64 or 12B 

The STEREO S!D Cartridge etfectively adds a second complete SiD chip to yojr 
Commodore 64 or 128, giving you a total of 6 separately controllable voices. SID 
SYMPHONY may be attached to your home stereo or most amplified speaker systems 
to provide you with whole new dimension in sound. Create your own stereo music using 
the Robert Stoerrle's Stereo Editor (which we include free with ComputBi's Enhanced 
SID Player book), or just enjoy the many hundreds of available songs by using Mark A. 
Dickenson's Stereo Player software (included free with the SID SYMPHONY Cartridge). 
If you're interested in creating your own music files, be sure to get a copy of Compute's 
Music System for the Commodore 128 afKi 64: The Er\han<^ SID Plsyer. 
SID SYMPHONY CadfidgG $39.95 Compute's Music System Book $22.95 
Shipping: US: $5.00 (Cartridge}, $3,50 (Book), $7.00 (Both). Canada add $4.50. 




Power Backed REU Interface and 






-•£'/ 



^m^?:-:- 


- -■■"■■■■■? /-S^^^tit^JiS- 


»*^^^_^: - ■l«S«SSSS^ 






--—"•■• • -i 



RAMLink is a multi-purpose hardware intedace designed to overcome the limitations of existing 
RAI^ expansion units (REU's). RAMLink delivers the performance and compalibiiity lacking in 
past REU's by incorporating CMD's proprietary RL-DOS and advanced features into a compact 
unit which allows most software to utilize Commodore 1700 series REU's, GEORAM. PPI's 
RAMDrive, and CMD's RAf^Card as if it were a disk drive. Optional RAMCard installs internally 
and can be used alone or in combination with the storage of an external REU for a maximum 
capacity of 16 Megabytes. 

* Supports Commodoru 1700, 1764, 1750, Berkeley Softworks GEORAM and PPI's RAMDrJve. 

• Optional RAMCard allows RAMLink to be used as a RAM Disk with or without a separate REU. 
User Expandable from 1 Mb to 15 Mb using standard SIMMs. 

• Pass-Thru connector allows use of cartridge port peripherals such as utilfty cartridges. 

* Reset, Disabis, Direct Access mode and SWAP functions are all standard features. 
> RAM pofi provkies power back-up to REU's, 

* Parallel port pfovkJes ultra-fast data transfer when connected to CMD HD series hard drives. 

• Includes separate power supply - optional battery available to protect against power failure. 
RAMUr* {without RAMCard) $1 79.95 RAMUr^ Battery back-up unit J24.95 
RAMUnk w/ RAMCard (0 Mb) $219.95 Parallel Cable for CMD HD $14.95 
RAMCard w/ Mb (i1 purchased separately) $59,95 1 Mb RAM SIMMs {CALL for current price) *$59.95 
•RAM pries when Ad was aeated, Fcx current prices on al capadlas • CALL Prices and sped Icalons abject to change witticul rKJtice- 

Shipping: US: $10.50 (UPS). $18.00 (2nd day), COD add $4.00. Canada $20.00. 



Both RAMLink and RAMDrive Include RL-DOS 

• Allows commerciat software to access all available RAM as a high-performance RAM Disk. 
> gatoWay software for GEOS use available al no addrtiorni charge. 

• RL DOS perfomis up to 20 times faster than Commodore RAMDOS. up to 4O0 limes faster 
Ifian a stock 1541 and provides full DCS command compatbiiity. 

• Up to 31 1541/1571/1581 emulation or Native mode panilions, plus true subdireclorks, 

• Includes buIJt-in JiffyDOS Kemal for high-speed access to JrffyOOS equ|)ped disk drives. 

• Software tor copying files (FCOPY) and complete disks (MCOPY) included. 

• Many other features, including CMDs exclusive device number SWAP functions. 



RAMLink or RAMDrive - Which one Is right for you? 

Both RAMUrJc and RAMDrive give Commodore users powerful features never before available tn 
a RAM ejqjander. RAMDrive is intended mainly for those who do not require the high RAM capacity 
of RAMLink ( up to 1 6 Mb ), RAMUnk's Pass-Thru pon o r the paiallel port for communicating with 
the CMD HD Series of hard drives, RAMDrive is an excellent choice for those who desire portability 
since the internal battery pack can keep the come ms of RAMDrive intact forseveral days. RAMLink 
is the perfect choice for GEORAM owners who want ihe ability to use that device with programs 
other than GEOS. RAMLink has a built-in RAM Port for easy use wrih a GEORAM or Commodore 
REU. No matief whch CMO RAM device you seteci. yoi/ll benefit from the fantastic capafairrties 
of a high speed RAM disk equipped with RL-DOS ar\d the outstanding value oi CMD support. 



RAMDrive • A High Perfornfiance Battery Backed RAI\fl Cartridge 

RAMDrive is a fresh new approach to RAM expansion for the Commodore S4 and 128. 
RAMDrive is a self contained battery backed cailridge with capacities of 5 12K,1 Mb and 2 Mb. 
RAMDrive incorporates RL-DOS, an ultra-fast^ easy-to-use operating system similar to the 
HD-DOS found in CMD HD Series hard drives. This DOS allows various types of partitioning 
along with compalibiiity and speed unsurpassed by previous RAM Expansbn systems. 

* Compatible wKh vast amounts of commercial software as an ultra*fast RAM disk. 

• Power back-up eliminates the Joss of files upon powering down the computer while the 
built-in battery protects data during transportation or power outages, 

• Available in 51 2K, 1 Mb and 2 Mb nmdels at Incredibly low prices. 

« DOS Includes Jiffy DOS Kernal routines for high speed disk access with Jiffy DOS equipped 
disk drives. 

• Software for copying and GEOS compatibility included. 

* Reset switch allows computer reset without loosing data In RAMDrive. 

* Reset, Disable and SWAP functions are all standard features, 

RAMDrive wyS12K $149.95 RAMDrive w/1 Mb $199.95 RAMDrive w/2 Mb $289.95 

Shipping: US: $7.50 (UPS). $14.00 [Ind day). COD add $4.00. Canada $15.00, See Ordering and Shaping 

jniormation elsewlwfs in this ad for credit card infonnalbn. RAMDrive designed and manufactured by Performance 

Periipherab, Inc. Prices and spec rficat ions subject to change without notice. 



CMD 



Creative Micro Designs, Inc. 




nve 



m-^-m 



iill 



50 industrial Dr., P.O. Box 646, East Longmeadow, MA 01028 
ORDERS ONLY: 800-638-3263 BBS: 41 3-525-01 48 

Questions/Support: 413-525-0023 FAX: 413-525-0147 



CMD 



Circle Reader Service Number 157 




NEWS & NOTES 



Ultimately Bad 



Origin (110 Wild Basin, Suite 230, Austin, Texas 78746) announces the re- 
lease of two new titles for the 64: Lord British*s Ultima Vt ($69.95) and Chris 
Roberts's Bad Blood ($49,95). Uncover the mystery of the gargoyles in the 
sixth episode of the Ultima saga. As Avatar, you and your tnjsty band of 
friends venture forth from the shores of Britannia to the dark reaches of the 
underworld. 

In Bad Blood you must save the mutant survivors of a nuclear holocaust 
from the hatred of their human foes. The new leader of the pureblood humans 
seeks to enslave, and eventually destroy, the entire race of mutants. You have 
been sent from your tribal village to scour the bombed-out cities in search of a 
way to overcome centuries of bad blood. Just be sure to arm yourself to the 
teeth for battles against gun-toting slavers and airborne buzars. 




Croc 

Croc by Vincent D. Zahnle of Martinez, Georgia, 
is this disk's Picture of the Month. 

Welcome to "Gazette Gallery:" Each month Gazette Disk features a collec- 
tion of the best 64/128 artwork submitted by our readers. We pay $50 for 
each piece of art we accept and an extra $50 for the one selected as Picture of 
the Month. Send original art to Gazette Gallery, COMPUTE Publications, 
324 West Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, Greensboro, North Carolina 27408. 



Fast Hat 
Trick 

Hatronics (145 Lincoln Street, 
Montdair, New Jersey 07042) an- 
nounces its HART (Hatronics 
Asynchronous Receiver/Trans- 
mitter) interface for the 64 and 
128. This high-speed RS-232 in- 
terface (s capable of sustaining in- 
terrupt-d riven sehal-to-parallel 
and parallel-to-seria! data conver- 
sions at speeds in excess of 
19.2Kbaud. 

HART connects via the com- 
puter's cartridge port and is fully 
programmable in BASIC, 6502 
and 8502 assembler, and other 
languages. Although still under 
development, HART will be pro- 
vided with programming infor- 
mation, terminal software, and 
file-transfer programs for use with 
most modems and IBM PCs. 



Great Balls 
of Fire 

A multitude of colored balls are 
falling from the sky, and it's your 
job to make them disappear. 
That's the aim of Pick 'n Pile 
($29.95), a new release this spring 
from the French company Ubisoft 
and distributed by Electronic Arts 
(1820 Gateway Drive, San Mateo, 
California 94404). 

To make the balls disappear, 
you must stack columns of identi- 
cal balls. The column must be sur- 
rounded by others in order to 
make it vanish. Once a column 
has been completed, it disap- 
pears. If you are skillful enough to 
clear the screen of the balls, 
you're off to the next level. This 
exciting and frustrating game is 
designed for one or two players. 
Joysticks required. b 



G^ COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



FOR ORDERS AND ^ AAA -VB-A Ar-AIT 

u1!['»Kll 1 -800-759-6565 

Orif cr Hours: M<in-T(iur«, 9iim-7pm/Fri, 9aat-6:30pm/aOSED Sal/S«in,9:30'6{n) 



Wf INVITE CORPORATE & EDUCATIONAL CUSTOMERS 

DISCOUNTS FOR QUANTITY ORDERS 

RUSH SERVICE AVAILABLE! 




COMPUTE 

(GAZETTE) 

5/91 



SSSii (718)692-0790 - 

MOiyiGOMtftY GRANT: MJUL ORDER DIPT. ^ 

P.O. BOK 58 RROQKm NY, 11230 

FAX #7186923372 / TEEX 422132 MCRA»T 

RETAiL OUTLET PENN STATION, MAUV CONCOURSE 

(Reneath Madison Sq. Garden) NYC, NV lOQOt 

Sigic Hrs: MONWED 97/THURS 9 VFRI 9-S:30/aOSED SATURDAY/SUN 9:30 7 

FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE CALL: (718) 692^1148 

CUSTOMEfl SERVICE HOUHS: MON-TMUHS 9am-5|ini/FRI 9ain-4iim/SUH lOBm-lpm 



C^Commodore 128 

C-128D w/Built-in Disk Drive 
Includes 1 FREE Game 



C-Commodore 



® 



Includes: 

* GEOS PTogram • Quantum Link Software 
^ One Joystick 



(a $19.95 Value) 



^399 

128D COMPLETE 
PACKAGE 

•Commodore 128-D Computer 

with Built-in Disk Drive 
•80 Column Printer 
•12" Monitor 
•FREE Game (a $19.95 Value) 

'499 





FREE 

Joystick (Ncccssaiylo 



128D DELUXE 
PACKAGE 

•Commodore 128D Computer 

with Built-in Disk Drive 
• RGB Color Monitor 
80 Column Printer 
' FREE Game (a $1 9,95 Vaiue) 

'999 

WE CAN RECONFIGURE ANY OF OUR COMPUTER 
PACKAGES TO YOUR SPECIFICATIONS. CALL FOR DETAILS! 



64C 

TEST PILOT 

PACKAGE 

■Commodore 64C 

Computer 
•Commodore 154*1 

Disk Drive 
'Ace Joystick 
■GEOS Program 
'Quantum Link 

Software 

/^ 5 SOITWARE 
PACKAGES INClUDESt 

• Advanced TacliulRghiw ■ inRtraioril . 
garner > Crazy Cars . Tomohairi^ 



COMMODORE 

64C COMPLETE 

PACKAGE 

•Commodore 64C 

Computer 
•Commodore 1541 

Disk Drive 
•80 Column Printer 

• 12" Monitor 
*GEOS Program 

• Quantum Link 
I Software 



PRINTER 
SPECIALS 




IBM 

Ccmpad, 80 Column Thermal 
Printer 



*29 



95 



LOW COST COMMODORE 
INTEnFACB^^.. IN STOCK 



STAR 

NX-1000C ._.......$1 79.95 

NX-1000C Rainbow.. .$227.95 

NX-1001 .$159.95 

NX-1020Rairbow $199.95 

NX-2420 $309.95 

NX'2420 Rainbow $349.95 

EPSON 

LX-atO ....$189.95 

LQ-S10 $279.95 

FX-B50 $329.95 



CITIZEN 

GSX-UO ........$264.95 

200GX $169.95 

COLOR OPTION 
KITS.............. CALL 

PANASONIC 

KXP-11B0... $159.95 

KXP-1191 $244.95 

KXP-1124 $279.95 

KXP-1624 $349.95 

COMMODORE 
MPS 1230 $189.95 



'299 '359 



COMMODORE 

64C COLOR 

PACKAGE 

•Commodore 64C 

Computer 

* Commodore 1541 

Disk Drive 
■ 80 Column Printer 

* Color Monitor 
•GEOS Program 

* Quantum Link 

Software 



>499 



COMMODORE 1520 

40 Column Color Ptotler Printer 



^19 



95 



SANYO PR-3000 

Daisy Wheel Letter Quality Printer 



S59 



95 



COMMODORE 1571 
DISK DHIVE 

RAPID ACCESS 
FD-168 

COMMODORE 154111 
DISK DRIVE 

RAPID ACCESS 
FD-148 

COMMODORE 1084 
MONITOR 



CALL 
<249 
SI 69 

SI 99 
«279 



MAGNAVOX 13" COLOR 
COMPOSITE MONITOR 
(64, 64C Compattblo) 

MAGNAVOX 13" COLOR 
RGB/COMPOSITE MONITOR 
(€4,640,126, t2€D, Amiga 
Compatible} 

1750 CLONE 
RAM EXPANSION 

OTHER ACCESSORIES FOR YOUR 

coMMooDRE coMPUTm hmmiij 



«179 

$259 
^89 



PERIPHERALS FOR COMMODORE 

COMMODORE 1700 RAM Expansion S79.95 64, 640 Power Supply ......$29.95 

COMMODORE 1764 Expansion Module.$1 19.95 COMMODORE 1351 Mouse.,,. $49.95 

CAROCO G-WIZ Interface....... .....S49.95 XETEC S. Graphix Jr. Interfaca........... $29.95 

COMMODORE 1660 Modem S19.95 XETEC S. Graphix Sr. Inlerface $49.95 

COMMODORE 1670 Modem S79.95 | Micro C-128 Power Supply....... $59,95 | 



NO SURCHARGE FOR CREDIT CARD ORDERS 
CUSrOMER TOLL FREE TECHNiaL SUPPORT 

!,ppimia, DiiMsra 

- . , ,^^ ^„„ ^«,,„,^- i,„«,„uimg P.0.8, Non- 

.^. , , «KSliiietearance. Pf(ccs and availabimv»ub(cct 10 change without 
nolicc. Not reBponiibloror typographic orrors. Rciurn o1 defective mcrchandjsc! must Ravo prior 
return authorizatTon number or returns will nol be accepted. Shipping & Haudlmg oddilional. Second 
Day & Next Day Air available at extra coal. Canadian orders please call lor shippin g rates APO FPO 
o Jera pleaseSdd lO-- ahipping & handling. Alt APO f POoSterfaSiKpSJI^PrS^ 
AH orders can be shtpped atrexpresa.CatlTor details. Wecheck for credit card theft, DCAaBOtftll 



SEE OUR AD IN THIS MONTH'S AMIGA SECTION OF THIS MAGAZINE FOR GREAT AMIGA SPECIAL VALUES 




DBACK 



EDITORS 



AND 



READERS 



Pope Gregory Did It 

I realize Module 64 (January 1 99 1 ) is 
not primarily a calendar program, but 
rather a demonstration of how the 
program can load routines from a disk 
and link ihem together. I take issue, 
however, with the statement that 
Module 64 will print any month be- 
tween the years and 2300. The years 
1700, 1800, 1900, 2100, and 2200 are 
not leap years, as the demo indicates. 
Also, I see no notice of the fact that in 
the year 1 582, ten days were omitted 
from the calendar when we switched 
from the Julian to the Gregorian cal- 
endar. In 1 582, the day following Oc- 
tober 4 was October 1 5. The Module 
64 calendar is correct only from 
March 1900 to January 2100. 

RUSSELL E. HOLT 
CANDIA. KH 

You're right, Russell While time 
may flow in a continuous stream (if 
we discount what some science fic- 
tion writers may say), trying to 
track it with calendars introduces a 
few holes and gaps. Pope Gregory 
made calendars more accurate 
when he devised his calendar with a 
leap year adjustment, but he unwit- 
tingly made it tough for computer 
programmers. Several readers 
pointed out these and other prob- 
lems. See the following letter. 

A shortcoming with the Module 64 
calendar is that the program allows for 
years prior to 1 582 to be selected. For 
the Gregorian calendar, these years 
didn't exist. Also, for use in the Unit- 
ed Slates and Canada, the program 
should limit the dales prior to 1752 — 
September 14 to be exact. This was 
the date that the Gregorian calendar 
came into use in the British colonies. 

ROBERT C MARCUS 
ST. THOMAS, ON 
CANADA 

That*s an interesting historical 
point you don 't see mentioned with 
most perpetual calendars. We're 
glad to know that Module 64 works, 
even if the demonstration's accura- 



cy is questionable. For those readers 
who may need to know the day of 
the week for any date on the Grego- 
rian calendar, including those pesky 
end-of century, nonleap years 
whose numbers end in 00 but are 
not evenly divisible by 400, COM- 
PUTE programmer Bruce Bowden 
offers this simple program. By the 
way Romania didn't accept the 
Gregorian calendar until 191 7. 



MJ 5 



MH 


10 


RB 


20 


QJ 


30 


CC 


40 


BJ 


50 


FS 


60 



GB 7t 



PIH 80 
KC 90 



REM GREGORIAN DAY OF THE 
{ SPACE }WEEK - BRUCE BOWDE 
N 

D$ = *»MM/DD/YYyY" 

PRINT "ENTER THE DATE AS 

{SPACE} ";D$: INPUT R$ 

IF LEN(R$)<>LEN(D$} THEN 
20 

M=VAL{LEFT$(R$,2)) :D=VAL 

(MID$(R$,4,2)) :Y-VAL(RIG 

HT$(R$,4)) 

F=365*Y+D+3L*(M"1) 

IF M<3 THEN F = F+INT ( (Y 

-1)/4)^INT(.75*(INT(((Y-' 

1)/100)+1))) 

IF M>2 THEN F = F-INT(.4 

*M+2.3)+INT (Y/4)^INT{.75 

*(INT (Y/100)+l) ) 

DY = F-INT (F/7) *7 

PRINT"WITH SATURDAY=0, T 

HE DAY IS"?DY 



A Different Calendar Lament 

Can you help me with Monthly Calen- 
dar (March 1 989)? Various hnes in 
the calendar printout don*t line up. I 
have a 1280, a Star SG-10 printer, 
and a G-Whiz interface. 

R. H. LENTZ 
JOSHUA TREE, CA 

I have a fix for Monthly Calendar. 
The program won't work with the set- 
up that I have. I have a Star NP-10 
printer and a G-Whiz interface. I had 
to change the following two lines to 
make it come out right. 

1030 PRINT#4,CHR$(18);"(2 SPACES) 
SUNDAY(6 SPACES)MONDM (5 
SPACES)TUESDA\ (3 SPACES) 
WEDNESDAy(2 SPACES)"; 

1040 PRINT#4,CHR$(18);'^THURSDAy 
(4 SPACES) FRIDAY(4 SPACES) 
SATURDAi^(3 SPACES)";GM$ 



1 hope this helps some people who 
may have had trouble with the 
printouts. 

RICHARD BUTTERFIELD 

atascadero, ca 

Thanks, Richard. That seems to be 
just the fix that Mr. Lentz needs. 
When readers with certain hard- 
ware configurations have problems 
getting programs to run, it 's difficuh 
for us to offer solutions when we 
don't have the same hardware on 
hand. That's why we encourage 
readers to send in tips or Bug-Swat- 
ters that can help others with simi- 
lar problems. 

Best CAD 

What are the best CAD programs for 
the 64 and the 128, and who makes 
them? 

BRIAN TREASE 
ERIE, MI 

It's tough to say which of any kind 
of program is best, and we would 
hesitate to tryi Since there aren 't too 
many CAD programs available for 
the 64 or 128, however, we can men- 
tion a few titles. Chances are we'll 
leave one or two out — and I'm sure 
we'll hear about the ones we do — 
but the following programs are still 
readily available, 

CADPak 64 ($39,95) and 
CADPak 128 ($59.95) from Abacus 
Software (5370 52nd Street SE, 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 49512) 
are fine programs that have been 
around for some time. CAD-3D 
($53.95) from IHT Software (2269 
Chestnut Street, Suite 162, San 
Francisco, California 94123) is 
another. 

For more specialized pro- 
grams, there's Home Designer 128 
($39.95) from Free Spirit Software 
(58 Noble Street, Kutztown, Penn- 
sylvania 19530). If you want to de- 
sign printed circuit boards, check 
out Printed Circuit Board 64 
($75.00) from Microsentinel Sys- 
tems (RO. Box 4135, San Pedro, 
California 90731-4135). B 



<|^ COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



GAZETTE 
D\SK L/BRARY 

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AT AFFORDABLE PRICES 

All Gazette disks are menu-driven for ease of use — ^and they feature oomplete 
documentation. Just load and you're ready to go! 



SpeedScrlpt $ 1 1 .95 

COMPUTE Publications' most popular program 
ever, Powerful word processing package includes 

SpeedScripf for the 64, SpeedScript 128. spelling 
checkers for both 64 and 1 28 versions, plus an 
additional dozen support programs, including 
mail-merge and word-count utilities. 

Gazette Index $7.95 

Every article and department from Gazette — July 
1983 through December 1989 issues — Is indexed: 
features, games, reviews, programming. "Bug- 
Swatter." "Feedback/' and the other columns. 
Disk features pull-down menus, help screens, 
superfast searching/sorting capabilities, and 
much more- 
Best Gazette Games $9.95 
Best dozen arcade and strategy games ever 
published in Gazette all on one disk. All games for 
Commodore 64. Titles: Crossroads II: Par)demo~ 
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VolleybalL Mosaic. Power Poker, and Scorpion II, 



Gazette's Power Tools $9.95 

Fourteen of the most important utilities for the 
64 ever published in Gazette, For serious users. 
Titles: MetaBASIC. Disk Rapid Transit. Mob Maker, 
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PrintScreen. 1526 PrintScreen. Fast Assembler. 
Smart Disassembler. Comparator. Sprint II and 
Turbo Format. 

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Gozeffe's best 1 3 programs for GEOS and GEOS 
1 28 users. Selection includes utilities, applications, 
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Dumper. Font Grabber. GeoPuzzle. and 
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128 Classics $11.95 

Thirteen of Gozefte's best 128 programs, including 
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" For delivery outside the U.S. or Conodo, odd Si for surfoce maif or $3 for awmoi AJI orders must be in U.S. funds drown on o U.S. bank. 



with %wht 



USE YOUR COMPUTER 
TO UNLEASH YOUR ARTISTIC TALENTS 



^^f f you're an artist who wants to express your creative 
|AJ talents, your 64 can be an exciting medium. Let's 
^W take a look at the wonderful world of Commodore 
^^ graphics. To begin with, there are benefits and ad- 
vantages of creating an on a computer over using more 
traditional methods. Unlike using tools such as brush, 
pen, pencil, charcoal, or pastels, which wear out and have 
to be cleaned, drawing on a computer's digital canvas isn't 
messy, and the medium is renewable. Also, there's no ad- 
ditional expense for new supplies. 

You can create unlimited patterns and textures with 
different brush tips and nibs that you can save and use 
many times. The ability to experiment and change your 
mind as you work is open to you. By generating art on 
your computer, you can save the stages of your work in 
progress to disk for later retrieval. If you make a mistake, 
you can easily undo the last action. If you "spill" color 
somewhere, you don't have to grab a cloth and worry that 
your painting is ruined. You have the freedom to let your 
creativity How, to make decisions as you work, and not to 
feel locked into a particular route. 

If you decide that an earlier course was a better one, 
call up the last image and start with a fresh new approach, 
rather than starting from scratch. Also, by saving in stages, 
you'll have a visual record of sequences from sketch to 
finished artwork and learn from past efforts. 

Cut-and-Paste Artist 

The ability to duplicate portions of your image by cutting 
and pasting sections saves you from the tedious task of re- 
drawing multiple objects by hand. Because you are work- 
ing on an exact replica of the original, you can share your 
images with fellow computer users. So it is very easy to 
duplicate your electronic images and share originals by 
swapping disks or uploading to a BBS. 



Tools of the Trade 

As with traditional artists, choosing the right tools is im- 
portant to a computer graphic artist. As a traditional artist 
chooses the right brushes and nibs, you'll have to decide 
which is the best input device to suit your needs. Then 
youMl have to decide on a paint program. 

A joystick is fine for arcade and maze games in which 
up, down, left, right, and diagonal movements are re- 
quired, but it is not well designed as a drawing implement. 
A trackball might be more useful for drawing smooth free- 
hand curves, but it is very slow and unstable for doing 
straight lines. 

Using a touch tablet and stylus that emulate pen and 
paper might seem more natural to some; unfortunately, 
they are not very accurate and are rather jittery. The Koa- 
la Pad touch tablet is popular but no longer made, but the 
pad that comes with Animation Station is a good replace- 
ment. 

Using a lightpen is very close to drawing with an air- 
brush or paintbrush, but be careful of static when touching 
the monitor screen. Also, your hand and arm may become 
cramped by holding the lightpen in the air without sup- 
port. The lightpen pointer, or cursor, may get lost in dark 
or red areas of the image, and you will be unable to move 
it. Many lighlpens are cheaply made and are not precise. 
An exception of high quality is the Flexidraw Inkwell 
Lightpen. 

The input device that provides the most accurate re- 
sponsiveness and best follows the movements of your 
hand is a true-proportional 1351 mouse. Many computer 
artists find this to be the optimal input device. 

Two Graphic Modes 

The 64 has two graphic resolution modes. Multicolor, 
sometimes referred to as medium resolution, is the most 



G^ COMPUTE 



A rr L 

MAY 1991 



H U 



H 





^^ 


Ay 


^ ^rg=^^ ^.--<I^^ff''"^ / 






k 




popular formal and is often used for 

game title screens and graphics. It has 
a 160 X 200 pixel display and allows 
more colors to be used closer together. 

High-resolution mode is com- 
posed of a bitmap image of 320 X 200 
pixels. This mode allows for more 
pixel detail but limits placing colors 
in close proximity. Hi-res mode is 
used mostly for printer output rather 
than for screen displays. Koala is the 
standard format for multicolor, and 
Doodle is the popular format for high- 
resolution graphics. These programs 
were the first to exploit the graphics 
capabilities of the 64. (See ''Bitmap 
Graphics on the Commodore 64.") 

Many of the graphics packages 
that have followed Koala and Doodle 
have advanced to the point that they 
include many state-of-the-art drawing 
tools that would have been found only 
on programs for more expensive 
graphic computers. Each of the pro- 
grams mentioned includes the basic 
drawing tools of freehand, line, box, 
circle, zoom, copy and paste, and 
undo. But they also have their own 
unique features that set them apart. 

Graphics Galore 

Because the 64 is a powerful yet inex- 
pensive computer for creating graph- 
ics, a plethora of paint programs 
quickly sprang up, but only a handful 








r 



V' 



I 







Excellent examples of a 64*8 black-and- 
white and color graphics are these 
prctures of a cabin, by Perry Miller, and 
a frog, by T. Preston Chesser. 



of them have endured the test of time. 
In the past if you wanted to draw in 
both multicolor and high-resolution 
modes^ you had to buy two separate 
packages. Advanced Art Studio is an 
easy-to-use menu-driven^ multicolor 
program that supports multiple input 
devices. This British import also 
comes with Advanced OCPArt Studio, 
which is basically the same program, 
but in high-resolution mode. 

Advanced Art Studio is unique be- 
cause of its pull-down menu system. It 
offers three levels of magnification in 
zoom mode (2 X , 4 X , 8 X), as well as 
scaling, mirroring, and rotating sec- 
tions of the screen and saving them 
for later access. It includes a spray- 
paint feature and built-in editors for 
defining custom pens, brushes, pat- 
terns, and fonts. It includes a gray- 
scale printer dump option. 

Digital Artist is an all-purpose, 
state-of-the-art, full-featured, high- 
resolution graphic design program 
that supports a 1 35 1 mouse or joy- 
stick and RAM expansion units and 
allows for editing on a virtual page 
larger than the viewing screen. Many 
features set this program apart from 
its competitors. These include a 
unique graphical user interface, digital 
parameter display of coordinates for 
precise alignment, rotation of selected 
object at any arbitrary angle, turbo- 



yi TIME 

. ^ AND 

' MONEY 

Yes, save time and money! Subscribe to the Gazette 
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grams for your Commodore 64 or 128— already on 
disk! 

Subscribe today, and month after month you'll 
get all the latest, most challenging, and fascinating 
programs published in the corresponding issue of 
COMPUTE, 

New on the Gazette Disk! In addition to the 
programs that appear in the magazine, you1l also 
get outstanding bonus programs. These programs, 
which are often too large to offer as type-ins, are 
available only on disk— they appear nowhere else. 

As another Gazette Disk extra, check out 



"Gazette Gallery," where each month we present the 
very best in original 64 and 128 artwork. 

So don't waste another moment. Subscribe to- 
day to COMPUTE'S Gazette Disk and get 12 issues 
for only $49.95. You save almost 60% off the single- 
issue price. Clip or photocopy and mail completed 
coupon today. 

Individual issues of the disk are available for 
$9.95 (plus $2.00 shipping and handling) by writing 
to COMPUTE, 324 West Wendover Avenue, Suite 
200, Greensboro, North Carolina 27408. 



YES! 



Start my one-year subscription 

to COMPUTES Gazette Disk right away 
for only $49.95.* 

n Payment enclosed (check or money order) 
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Mail to COMPUTE'S GazBtte Disk, P.O. Box 3250, Harlan, )A 51593-2430 

• Residente of WC and NY. pleaso add appropriate sates tax for your mm. Canadian 

ord«rs, add 7% goods and services tex. 



The Best Prices & Service 



Lowest Prices Ever on 
Commodore-Ready Printers! ^ 





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THF COMPUTER PRINTER J- V/ ^ 




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speed draft at J 44 cps features the new paper parking 

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Telecommunications for Your Commodore! 

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work with ALL communications softv;are for the 64. b^C, and 
1 28 Key fcaiures include seven status indicators. Busy Detect, 
DTP srgnal support. High Speed Detect Line, cind Auto Answer/ 
Auto DiS includes MuJtiterm 64 and 1 28 software so you can 
start communicatjng right away, plus a free trial hou' on 
CompuServef Fuf 1-year warranty, 

Best Buys on 
Commodore Hardware 

64C Computer S4S74 Si 29.95 

1670 Modem, T 200 Baud 36952 S69.95 

1351 Mouse C64/C1 28 37885 $32.95 

1 0S4S RGB Composite Monitor 74095 S3 T 9.95 

154T It Disk Drive (Jncfudes GEOSJ 54586 SCALL 

1 764 RAM Expansion C64 72513 $114.95 



Tine Amiga vef SJon of the Mjnimodem is equipped with a 
female connector to pfug drrectfy into the Amiga 500 or 2000, 
It needs no external waif plug for power, and uses the Amiga's 
audio output for majrimum ffdelrry 
Mfnimodem-C24 f2400 Baud for C64/CI 28) 

88148 S79.9S 

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Minimodem-AM24 (2400 Baud for Amiga] 

88TS0 $79.9S 



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TENEX MW 701 -A. Conservativefy rated at SVand 1 .8A 

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the case. Ufetime warranty. Sug Retail 549.95 

TENEX MW70T^ 84513 $34.95 

TENEX MW 705, Perfect for your C-I28I This is a heavy- 
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COMMODORE 64 am COMMODORE 128 are registered trademarks of Commodore EiectronfCS. Ltd AMIGA ts a regstered trademark of Commodore Amiga fnc , NOTE Due to puDf.Shing 
lead limes, produa prices and specifications are subjea to change without nonce - APO. FPO. AK. Hf. CN. VI. GU. and foreign orders are sutyect to additional shipping charges. G5J 

Circle Reader Servrce Number 170 



DOS, an improved disk-operating sys- 
tem, and printer support. Its drawing 
tools feature right-angle lines, arc, 
multiple lines, measuring ruler, user- 
definable patterns and brushes, excel- 
lent text control, and hollow or filled 
ellipses, triangles, or parallelograms. 

Graphics from Overseas 

Many of the more powerful paint pro- 
grams are imports from Europe. Mas- 
terpiece, also known as 64 Image 
System, is imported from Europe by 
Scorpion Software. It supports both 
high-resolution and multicolor 
modes. Some of its unique features 
are its ability to twist, bend, rotate, 
stretch, and distort objects for strange 
and unusual special effects. 

Artist 64 is an outstanding multi- 
color paint program from England 
that has many features found only on 
Amiga paint programs. It supports 
joysticks and a mouse. There is a 
1351 mouse driver for it available on 
Quantum Link. 

It features multisided polygons 
from three to ten sides, the ability to 
draw with a cycle or rainbow of select- 
ed colors at a specified rate of speed, 
and protection and priority for colors 
to weave over and under each other 
(for those who decide to add a tree 
after drawing a brick wall and want to 
place it in the background). Other un- 
usual drawing commands include re- 
member cursor position (RCP) for 
drawing concentric circles, use last op- 
tion for repeating an action, grab a 
section of the screen with or without 
colors to use much as you might a 
cookie cutter or rubber stamp, repeat 
paste, draw continuously, and draw 
text with a pattern. 

Artist 64 also has an editor for 
unlimited brush tips and textures for 
shading. The most amazing feature of 
Artist 64 is that its 1 3 commands can 
each be affected by one or more of 21 
other options, for a total of more than 
250,000 possible effect combinations. 

AMICA Paint (Advanced Multi- 
color Computer Aided Paint) is an im- 
pressive and innovative graphics 
package from Germany, which I hope 
will be imported into the U.S. It pulls 
Amiga-like performance out of the 64. 

It loads and saves standard Koala 
files, as well as its own compressed 
picture format. Its unique pop-up, 
multilevel menus can be accessed by 
ftmction keys or hot keys. 

AMICA Paint also has color pro- 
tection and priority for selectively 
stenciling and masking certain colors, 
a repeat option, and a macro mode to 
load and save frequently used mouse 
movements and command sequences. 
It supports many hollow and filled 
shapes such as polygons, rays, ellipses, 
arcs, and cutout pie shapes. You can 



adjust the size and power of the spray 
command. The block option allows 
you to mirror, rotate, enlarge, reduce, 
scale, stretch, bend, slant, skew, tip, or 
tilt into perspective any section of the 
screen for 3-D effects. 

Other advanced features let you 
extrude, add a drop shadow, contour, 
thicken or smooth, create random gra- 
dient fills, mix, blend, or smear an 
area of the screen. You can load and 
save custom configurations such as 
cursor speed, movement and accelera- 
tion, keyboard support, or pixel 
movements. You can save to disk 
parts of the screen to use as custom 
brushes. There's an excellent built-in 
pattern and line editor, and it has the 
ability to rub through a second work 
area onto the current workscreen. 

An excellent zoom mode either 
magnifies the full screen or shows a 
small y^-screen zoom of the area 
around the cursor while the full screen 
is normal size. This last option allows 
all features to be used while in zoom 
mode. There is an excellent smooth- 
scrolling slideshow feature built in. A 
true-color cycling animation feature 



allows volcanoes to erupt and spheres 
to rotate. If that is not enough, there is 
the ability to load in animation, print- 
er, and expansion modules. 

Both Artist 64 and AMICA Paint 
are truly extraordinary graphics pack- 
ages for experienced 64 computer- 
graphics artists who are serious about 
their work and want many Amiga-like 
features. Too bad these European pro- 
grams are hard to find in the U.S. 

Graphics Conversions 

No one paint program can possibly 
provide all the features and tools you 
might want. So the ability to create a 
drawing with one paint package and 
then enhance the picture with features 
found in another program is to your 
advantage. Moving from one format 
to another can present problems, 
however. 

Unlike the Amiga IFF (Inter- 
change File Format) standard file for- 
mat that allows exchanging of images 
between different programs, each 64 
graphic program has a different file 
format. You can't simply load one im- 
age into another program and edit it. 



Bitmap Graphics on the Commodore 64 



How does your 64 translate data in memory 
to pictures on screen? The answer is bit- 
mapping. This term means that no transla- 
tion takes place— the data is the image. 

Memory on the 64 is composed of 
65,536 cefis, called registers. As a group, 
these registers constitute the computer's 
RAM (Random Access Memory). Any reg- 
ister can be accessed randomly by merely 
giving its address to the microprocessor. 
The register, which we refer to in the ath 
stract as a byte, is the fundamental unft of 
computer memory. Does this mean that no 
smaller memory units exist? No, simply that 
no smaller unit can be individually ad- 
dressed. In fact, there is a smaller unit of 
prime concern to graphics programming. 

Each byte carries with it eight digits. 
Each digit can have a value of either or 1 , 
similar to the off or on state of a light 
switch. These digits are called bits. 

When a bitmap is used to make a com- 
puter picture, the bits affect what is seen. 
On the 64, there are two kinds of bitmaps. 
One sees each bit as a screen dot that will 
be placed on the screen (high-resolution 
mode). These dots, or picture elements, are 
called pixels. The other kind of bitmap uses 
two bits side by side to represent a pixel 
(muiticolor mode). The difference has to do 
with the vray the 64 handles color. 

When each bit conresponds to a pixel, 
the bit is either off or on. Hence, there are 
two possible colors, a foreground color for 
the pixel whose bit has a value of 1 (on) and 
a background color where the pixel bit is 
(off). But if there are two bits to every pixel, 
then there are four color possibilities. The 
first two bits correspond to 10 in binary; 
that is, the first bit is on, and the second is 
off. The second pair is 01 , the third is 1 1 , 
and the fourth is 00. 



The 64*s microprocessor, the VIC (Vid 
eo Interface Chip), is specially designed for 
doing bitmapped graphics, but it has some 
peculiarities. The major one is the way it 
maps those bits to the screen. Remember 
that the bits are packaged eight to a byte 
and, although the VIC displays in bits, it ac- 
cesses memory in byte groupings. 

It starts with the pixel image at the top 
left of the screen as the 1 st byte of the 
memory region to be mapped. Instead of 
assembling the byte images straight across 
the screen to the end and continuing on the 
next line, it deposits subsequent bytes be- 
low the 1 st until there are 8 in the stack. 
The 9th is then placed next to the 1 st and 
starts a new stack; then the 17th is placed 
next to the 9th, and so on. 

When the end of the current row of 8- 
high stacks is reached, a new line is built in 
similar fashion below ft, starting with the 
321st byte. There are 25 of these 320-byte 
lines on a screen, resulting in 80O0 bytes 
per bitmap. Since there are 8 bits per byte, 
that makes a total of 64,000 bits, or pix- 
els— 320 across by 200 down. It isn't by 
chance that this stacking arrangement, 8 
bits across by 8 bytes deep, has the same 
dimensions as a character. 

So far, we have a monochrome image. 
The 8X8 character blocks are also the 
fundamental units for color assignment. 
Whether an image is 2-color or 4-color, the 
colors are decided within the 8-byte charac- 
ter block grouping. Once a new character 
block is reached, a new set of colors may 
apply. That's why all 1 6 colors can be seen 
on the screen at once but there are only 2 
colors within a character-sized region in 
Doodle art and 4 colors within the same 
region in Koala art. 
BRUCE BOWDEN 



©•12 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



VIDEO BYTE II the only FULL COLOR! 
video digitizer for tlie C-64, C^128 

Introducing the world's tirst FULL COLORt video digitizer for the Commodore 
C-64. 64-C, C-128 & 128-D computer. VIDEO BYTE can give you digitized video 
from you V.C.R., LASER DISK, BA/V or COLOR CAMERA or OFF THE AIR or 
CABLE VIDEO (thanks to a fast! 2.2 sec. scan time). New version 3.0 software 
features full RE-DISPLAY with MULTI CAPTURE MODE. MENU SELECT PRINT- 
ING. EXPANDED COLORIZING FEATURES. SAVE to DISK feature and much moref 
FULL COLORIZING! Is possible, due to a unique SELECT and INSERT color 
process, where you can select one of 15 COLORS and insert that color into 
one of 4 GRAY SCALES. This process will give you over 32.000 different color 
combinations to use in your video pictures. SAVES as KOALAS! Video Byte II 
allows you to save all your pictures to disk as FULL COLOR KOALA'S. After 
which (using Koala or suitable program) you can go in and redraw or color 
your V.B. pic's. LOAD and RE-DISPLAY! Video Byte II allows you to load and 
re-display all Video Byte pictures from inside Video Byte's menu. MENU DRIVEN! 
Video Byte II comes with easy to use menu driven UTILITY DISK with V3.0 
digitizer program. (64 MODE ONLY). COMPACT! Video Byte H's hardware is com- 
pact! In fact no bigger than your average cartridge! Video Byte comes with it's 
own cable. INTEGRATED! Video Byte II is designed to be used with or without 
EXPLODE! V5.0 color cartridge. Explode! V5.0's menu will return you to VIDEO 
BYTE irs menu. EXPLODE! V5 is the PERFECT COMPANION! Video Byte II users 
are automatically sent FREE SOFTWARE updates along with new documenta- 
tion, when it becomes available. PRINT! Video Byte II will printout pictures in 
BLACK and WHITE GRAY SCALE to most printers. However when used with 
Explode! V5.D your printout's can be done IN FULL COLOR 8 by Its SIDEWAYS 
on the RAINBOW NX-1000, RAINBOW NX-1000C, JX-80, Seikosha 3000 AL 
(OK! DATA 10/20's {print larger 6" by 91 USER SLIDE 
' ONLY \ SHOW program w/auto or manual display is startdard 
/$^AQI|\ ^'^^ ^'^^^ ^^^ program. And can be backed up!) 
Iv^llwDl Why DRAW a car, airplane, person or for that matter 
\ # U / , ■ . anything when you can BYTE it, . .VIDEO BYTE it 
instead! 



NEW! SUPER CARTRIDGE '^^ EXPLODE! V.5 

Group 

The MOST POWERFUL, DISK DRIVE and PRINTER CARTRIDGE ever produced for 
the COMMODORE USER. Super USER FRIENDLY with all the features most asked for 
New FEATURES. . (a) Faster non-blanking FASTLOAD. (b) MIRROR imaging of all HI-RES 
screens, (c) 4 Way color selection with insert, for all Hl-RES screens, (d) Infinite FILE 
COPY for all SEQ. & PRO, files, copy your file only once, then write that file to as many 
disks as you like, great for single file copying by small user groups (e) FULL COLOR 
PRINTING of ALL CDLOR HI-RES & MULTI-COLOR SCREENS to ALL COLOR DOT MATRIX 
PRINTERS {not for INK JET printers). (0 Direct ONE KEY access back to VIDEO BYTE 
software Ihw EXPLODE! V5.0*s 2nd MENU, (g) Supports ail popular printer interfaces, (h) 

FREE upgraded utility disk. 

SUPER FASTLOAD and SAVE {50K-9 SEC'S) works with ALL C.64 or C-128's NO MATTER 
WHAT VINTAGE or disk drives EXCEPT tfie 1581. M.SD. 1 or 2. SUPER FAST FORMAT 
(8 SEC'S). - plus FULL D.O.S. WEDGE w/standard format! SUPER SCREEN CAPTURE. Cap- 
ture and Convert ANY SCREEN to KOALA/DOODLE. SUPER PRINTER FEATURE allows 
ANY DOT MATRIX PRINTER even 1526/802 to print HLRES SCREENS in FULL COLOR (us- 
ing 16 shade GRAY SCALE). ANY PRINTER or INTERFACE COMBINATION can be used 
with SUPER EXPLODE! V5.0. NEW and IMPROVED CONVERT feature allows anybody to 
convert (even TEXT) SCREENS into DOODLE or KOALA TYPE PICTURES w/FULL COLOR! 
SUPER FAST SAVE of EXPLODE! SCREENS as KOALA or DOODLE FILES w/COLOR. SU- 
PER FAST LOADING with COLOR RE-DISPLAY of DOODLE or KOAU files SUPER FAST 
LOAD or SAVE can be turned OFF or ON without AFFECTING the REST of SUPER EXPLODES 
FEATURES. Tfie rest of Explode! V5,0 is still active. SUPER EASY LOADING and RUNNING 
of ALL PROGRAMS from the DtRECTORV. SUPER BUILTIN TWO WAY SEQ. or PRG. lile 
READER using the DIRECTORY. NEVER TYPE a FILE NAME AGAIN when you use SUPER 
EXPLOOE'S unique LOADERS. 

CAPTURE 40 COLUMN C or D-128 SCREENS! (with optional DISABLE SWITCH). 
All the above features, and mucfi morel 
PLUS A FREE UTILITY DISK w/SUPER EXPLODE! 
MAKE YOUR C-64. 64-C or C-128*, D-128* SUPER FAST and 
EASY to use. THE BEST THING of ALL , , IS THE PRICE!!! Still 
only $44.95 or w/disabfe $49.95. 
'Note UP GRADES for V5.0 are offered lo V4.1 owners oniy. 
$20.00. w/dis add $5. 

"Note V4.1 owners w/disable will be sent V5.0 w/disable for 
only $2a00 



'ONLY 

($4495) 



AH units come w/SO day WARRANTY. Ail orders add S3 (or UPS BLUE LABEL SiH. UPS BLUE available or^ly in 48 stales FOREIGN ORDERS are US FUNDS +$635 Sm ORDER BOTH EXPLODE! V5 & VIDEO 
BYTE II together and receive FREE!! UPS S/H "'Note all SALES are FINAL. 90 DAY WARRANTY covers PARTS & LABOR ONLY All SOFT GROUP UTILITY DISKS COME w/buittin CATALOG of PRODUCTS 



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foreign orders U.S. FUNDS ONLY $6.35 S/H. 



IL RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX 
Personal Checks 10 Days to Clear 



THE SOFT GROUP, P.O. BOX 111, MONTGOMERY, IL 60538 



There are approximately 50 
known graphic file formats for the 64. 
Without a conversion program that 
supports these different file formats, 
you could be lost. The best is Auto- 
graph by David DeSimone, known as 
Fuzzy Fox on Quantum Link. This 
graphics management utility may be 
downloaded from QuanlumLink's 
Graphic Support Group Libraries. It 
will automatically display, convert , 
copy, scratch, and rename many of 
the popular high-resolution and 
multicolor picture formats. 

The other program is Pixehnaster 
by Steve Emsley, Q-Link graphics for- 
mats expert, which is available from 
Silvasoft. It's a truly comprehensive 
graphic-translation, image-manipula- 
tion, and processing program for the 
64. It supports over 40 graphic formats 
so you can easily exchange graphics be- 
tween your favorite paint programs. 

Create Video Titles 

Because this is the video age, you can 
create video-creating cards or video ti- 
tles for your home videos with pack- 
ages like Video Title Shop and Home 
Video Producer by recording the 64 
composite video output onto a video 
cassette recorder. You can also use 
any paint package with large fonts 
from GEOS or Print Shop to caption 
your home videotapes. 



Graphics Support and 
Information 

.After youVe created your master- 
pieces, how can you share them with 
others? Where do you go for graphic 
utilities? Where do you get to chat 
with fellow artists, share ideas, and get 
questions answered and problems 
solved? The best place to get all of 
these things is the QuantumLink 
Graphic Support Group on Quantum- 
Link. Hook up your modem, and you 
can tap into this graphics resource and 
electronically transmit your picture 
just about anywhere in the United 
States. You can also chat with the 
masters of 64/ 1 28 graphics and other 



graphic programmers who host the 
Starving Artists Cafe chat room each 
night on QuantumLink from 10 p.m. 
to 1 a.m. 

Another outlet for your artwork 
is "Gazette Gallery," a feature found 
each month on COMPUTERS Gazette 
Disk. Accepted submissions earn $50, 
and the artwork selected as the Picture 
of the Month earns $ TOO. Artists re- 
tain the rights to their creations. E3 



Paul Hughes and his twin brother, Peter, 
are the editors of Geoworld magazine. Paul 
is also one of the sysops (SYSOP PH) of 
QuantumLink's Graphic Support Group. 



Advanced OCP Art Studio 


AMICA Paint 


$29.99 


Markt & Technik 


Rio/Datel 


64' er Magazine 


3430 E. Tropicana Ave., #65 


Leser Service 


Las\fegas, NV89121 


\ferlag Aktiengesellschaft 


(800)782-9110 


Hans-Pinse-Str. 2 


Digital Artist 


8013 Haar bei Munchen, Germany 


$49.95 


Autograph 


Digital Technology 


QuantumLink 


135 Collins St 


Quantum Computer Services 


San Francisco, CA 941 18 


8619 Westwood Center Dr. 


(415)346-5249 


Vienna, VA 22182 


MasterpiQCB 


(800) 392-8200 


$29.95 


Pixe/Masfer— $28.50 


Scorpion Software 


Silvasoft 


19 Harbor Dr. 


P.O. Box 1006 


Lake Hopatcong, NJ 07849 


Charlotte, VT 05445 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE C-t3 




REVIEWS 



BATTER UP! • PICK A PACK 
TENNIS, ANYONE? 



MICRO LEAGUE 
BASEBALL H 




Yes, baseball fans, you, too, can 
become a part of a time-honored 
and elite fraternity. They are the 
few, the proud, the loud. Here's 
your chance to assume the role of the 
sometimes not-so-poliie gentlemen 
who frequently explode from the dug- 
out, sprint across the baseball dia- 
mond, and accost the kindly, slightly 
nearsighted umpires, yelling just inch- 
es from their faces and kicking dirt on 
their shoes. Ah, the life of a major 
league manager! 

Before you position your favorite 
baseball cap backward on your pate 
and ready yourself for a full-fledged 
rhubarb, there are other demands of 
America's favorite pastime that a 
good baseball manager must master. 
Can your starting pitcher last the re- 
maining innings, or should you bring 
in a relief from the bullpen? Should 
you send the runner at first base to 
steal second? Do you signal the batter 
on deck to hit away or sacrifice bunt? 
These are but a few of the manage- 
ment skills featured in the new Micro 
League Baseball II Enhanced by Mi- 
cro League Sports. 

As in the original Micro League 
Baseball version, the object of the 
simulation is to manage a baseball 
team of your choice. Whether you win 
or lose depends on the managerial 
moves you make. The new and im- 
proved version, written especially for 
the 64, features improved ballpark 
graphics, pop-up screens for easy mid- 
game substitutions, stealing and base- 
running ratings, pitching/hitting stats 
vs. lefty or righty, a Quickplay option, 
and many other extras. 

Micro League Baseball II En- 
hanced is absolutely great, and noth- 



ing Fve seen comes closer to the real 
thing. If you've always wondered 
what it would be like to manage the 
power hitters of the 1927 Yankees or 
how they would fare against the speed 
and athletic ability of the 1988 Dodg- 
ers, this is your vehicle. The simula- 
tion comes with a listing of 26 
legendary teams of the past that you 
may pair as the home and visiting 
teams. Choose the stadium, the length 
of the series, and the rosters of your 
choice; and then play ball. 




Two managers may guide their 
respective teams to victory, or one 
manager can challenge the manage- 
ment skills of the computer. If you 
like, both teams can be managed by 
the computer while you sit back (beer 
and hot dog in hand) and watch as the 
game unfolds before you. 

Each manager is given the oppor- 
tunity to choose his or her offensive 
and defensive moves. When your 
team is at bat, you tell the batter to 
bunt, to swing away, or to hit and 
run— and whether to take the extra 
bases or not. Engineering a squeeze 
play or having a runner steal a base 
depends on your individual player's 
athletic ability, the throwing-arm ca- 
pabilities of the opposing team, and, 
of course, luck. 

On defense, you size up the abili- 
ty of the batter in the box. You decide 
whether you should instruct your 
pitcher to pitch an aggressive fastball, 
pitch out in anticipation of a stolen 



base, or intentionally walk the dude at 
the plate. You position the outfield 
shallow or deep, and you shift the in- 
fielders to guard the line or to play in 
at the corners. 

How deeply you will want to 
delve into this miniuniverse is up to 
you. Micro League Baseball II En- 
hanced lets you keep and compile 
stats on players, teams, leagues — you 
name it. You can trade players, cre- 
ate new rookies, and manufacture 
farm teams. 

STEVE HEDRICK 



Playability 4 

Documentation 4 

Originality 4 

Graphics 4 



Commodore 64 or 128— $39.95 

MICRO LEAGUE SPORTS 
2201 Drummond Plaza 
Newark. DE 19711-5711 

(302)368-9990 



PRO TENNIS TOUR 

In the makeup of Pro Tennis Tour, 
it almost seems as if the player has 
been forgotten. Yet, in spite of that 
lapse; the game is a faithful repre- 
sentation of the sport it strives to 
simulate. 

Based on the Grand Tour of pro- 
fessional tennis, which includes Wim- 
bledon, the French Open, the U.S. 
Open, and the Australian Open, Pro 
Tennis Tour lets you play matches at 
some of the world's most famous 
courts and to play in several modes of 
difficulty. 

For me, the primary difficulty 
came in mastering the joystick moves. 
To serve, you must click the fire but- 
ton, position a black cursor to where 
you want the ball to land in your op- 
ponent's court, and then release the 
button (in Advanced and Professional 
modes, you click again) to hit the ball 



G-14 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




Make your Commodore 
a Speed Demon 




TURBO MASTER CPU™ 

4,09 MHz Accelerator Cartridge for C64 

* Four times faster processing speed combined with five 

times faster disk Load and Save. 

► Software actually runs four times as fast. Basic, word- 
processor scrolling and search, spreadsheets, 
assemblers, graphics, GEOS etc. Compatible with most 
software, GEORAM compatible. 

» Jiffy DOS compatibility option available (by Creative 
Micro Designs). HD Compatible. 

» Why upgrade when you can enjoy dazzling performance 
from your C64 now? 

* Only $149, Shipping Included, lOday satisfaction guarantee. 



Don't tie up an expensive computer 

with a job 

a Commodore Can Do$$$ 





Data acquisition and control interfaces 
C64 & C128 

• 80-line Simplified Digital I/O Board with ROM cartridge socket. Model 
SS100 Rus. S139. 

• Ultimate Interface. Universally applicable dual 6522 versatile interface 
adapter board. Model 64tF22. $169. 

• 16-channel, 8-bit ana!og4o-digital conversion module add-on. Model 
641F/ADC08ia $69. 

• Interface boards include extensive documentation and program 6\sk. 
Manuals available separately for examination. Quantity pricing 
available. Call or write for detailed brochure. 

Resources for Serious Programmers. 

• Symbol Master Multi-Pass Symbol ic Disassembler, 064 & C128. $49.95 

• PTD6510 super-powerful Symbolic Debugger. C64. $49.95 

• M AE64 65O2/65C02 Macro Editor/ Assembler. $29.95 

• C64 Source Code Book. Kernal and Basic ROMs. S29.95 



"We engineer miracles.' 



SCHNEDLER SYSTEMS 

Dept. C5, 25 Eastwood Road, P.O. Box 5964 
AshevilJe, North Carolina 28813 Telephone: (704) 274-4646 



VISA and MasterCard accepted. 

A!1 prices include shipping 

prepaid to US addresses. 



Easy enough? Almost. Bui to re- 
turn a ball, you must press the joystick 
button to swing the racket back and 
then release to hit the ball. The prob- 
lem here is that your player stops 



1^; 

{t1:[!lill!!lillllt!l!lillilli!l!liSllllli!!lli!ill!lillll^^ 


Win 


^1 ,:,: :....;. LIU 


it) 111 Id m iH 1 


^^^L C . BHOUH 



moving once you cock your racket 
arm. .A.n added complication is choos- 
ing the desired return. For a lob, you 
move the joystick back; for a smash, 
you move it forward. 

Moves of this type are not un- 
common in computer games, and Tve 
found they work well in slower games 
such as golfing simulations. Here, if 
you want the fast action associated 
with tennis, youMl have to put in so 
many hours of practice that you'll 
probably feel like Jimmy Connors. 

Once you've passed this obstacle, 
however, the game can be enjoyable. 
You can practice your returns against 



an automatic serving machine, prac- 
tice serving, and play against the com- 
puter or a friend; but best of all, you 
can play the various world courts 
without having to play at champion- 
ship levels. 

Graphics and animation are very 
good, and care was taken to emulate 
the differeni playing surfaces found on 
the tour. The sound is so-so. 

In addition to documentation 
that is adequate without being osten- 
tatious, the game's booklet contains a 
section on tennis techniques, com- 
plete with diagrams. There's also a 
brief history of the game. 

Had it not taken me several 
hours of practice to achieve a medio- 
cre rating, I probably wouldVe en- 
joyed the game more. But it's a game, 
not an avocation, and I usually find 
myself feeling no more than luke- 
warm toward any game that demands 
I put in it more than Fll get out of it. 

If the user interface (in this case, 
the joystick moves) can be made as 
simple as a fast-action game demands, 
Pro Tennis Tour could be one of the 
great ones. As it stands, it's an average 
exercise that demands almost as much 
practice and skill to master as the 
real game of tennis. 

ERVIN BOBQ 



Playability 3 

Documentation 4 

Originality 3 

Graphics 4 



Commodore 64 or 128; joystick— $29.95 

UBI SOFT 

Distributed by Electronic Arts 

1820 Gateway Dr. 

San Mateo. CA 94404 

(415)571-7171 




I have this recurring nightmare. Tm 
being pursued by a loose stack of 
quarters, skittering after me in a 
Slinky-like motion. They're coming 
at me, shouting obscenities, trying to 
mow me down and bury me beneath 
their silver-and-copper sandwiched 
selves. They're angry with me, for 
now they'll never know the numis- 
matic ecstasy of sliding down the 
roller-coaster innards of an arcade 
game money box. I've got Mega Pack, 
Mega Pack from Virgin Games is 
a two-disk package often different ar- 
cade games for the 64/128. It leads off 
the first disk with Rebounder, a game 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 0-15 



• COMMODORE UPGRADES 



t 



NEW POWER SUPPUES 
JUST RELEASED 



O 



• A super-heavy, repairable C-64 power supply 
with an output of 4.3 amps (tfiat's over 3x as pow- 
erful as the original). Featuring 1 year warranty, 
ext, fuse, schematics. UL approved. This supply is 
used for multiple drives, additional memory and 
■packet." Cost is $37,96 and incJudes as a bonus 
eittief the Commodore Diagnostician U (valued @ 
$6.95) or the "programmers utility" piug-in car- 
tridge {valued @ ».95). 

• 4.3 amp supply for C-128. Same features as 
above — $45.50 (includes bonus package) 

• 1.8 amp repairable supply for C-64. (Over 

100,000 sold.) $24.95 

'1541 Commodore Power Supply . , , . . $34.95 

• 1541 II Commodore Power Suppfy . . . $44,95 

• 1541 B Commodore Power Supply . . . $37.95 

"PRINTHEAD" REFURBISHING 

S£Byi£E 

Save time and money by having your tired, 
worn-out or damaged printhead refurbished or 
remanufactured at a fraction of the cost of a 
new one. Features low cost, 5 day service and 1 
year warranty. Send tor pnces/mfo on 400 differ- 
ent types. 

COMMODORE DIAGNOSTICIAN II 

Originally developed as a software package, then 
cxinverled to a readable format, tt^e Diagnostician 
has become a fantastic seller. With over 28,000 
C-64 owners world-wide, Diagnostician 1/ utilizes 
sophisticated cross-reference gnds to locate faulty 
components (ICs) on all C-64 and C1S41 comput- 
ers (C- 128/64 mode). Save money and downtime 
by promptly locating what chip(s) have failed. (No 
equipment of any kind needed.) Just updated with 
30 changes to take advantage of the new 640 
combination chips/RAM changes found on new 
OBM boards. Success rate from diagnosis-to- 
repair ts 98%. $6.95 includes basic schematic. 
(Available for Amiga computers at $14.95.) 

COMMODORE 1750^ 512K RAM 
CARTRIDGE 

Now add another 512K to your C-64 (C-128). This 
IS a new factory unit. New low pnce Si 69.95 

EMERGENCY STARTUP KITS 

Repair your own Commodore/Amiga and save 
lots oi money Originally blister packaged for gov- 
ernment PXs worldwide, these kits are now avail- 
able to you (no soldenng). Kits for Amiga. C64 and 
drives. Send for full details. 

REPLACEMENT/UPGRADE 
CHIPS & FWRTS 

6526A CIA , SI 2 25 CBM to IBM Pnnter 

6581 SID 12.25 CaWe Adapter . . . 34.95 

6567 Vtdeo 1 5.95 0-64 Serv. Manual . . 34.95 

PL A 82S100 12.95 C-128 Serv. Manual .44.50 

8563 CRT 19.95 1541 Serv. Manual . .34.95 

All 901 ROMs 10.95 1084 Serv, Manual . 16.95 

251913 Kernal/Basic 16.95 C-64 Keyt)oard 39.95 

251715 Mem, Ctrl , . 19 95 SX64 Kybd/Cable . . 4995 

1571 Upgrd. ROM n 95 1541/1571 Parts Call ! 

C-128 ROMs 24,95 Comrnodore Cables . . Call i 

C-t28 Video RAM Super Graphics 57.50 

Upgrade 56.95 Super Graphk;s Jr. , . 49.95 



NEW SPRING '91 CATALOG 

36-page free catalog containing parts, upgrades, mem- 
ofves. power supplies, diagnostics, and oiner items rx>t 
found anywhere else 



VISA 



THE GRAPEVINE GROUP, INC. 

3 CHESTNUT STREET 

SUFFERN.NY t0901 

1-800-292-7445 

Fax 914 357 6243 914-357-2424 

We Ship Worldwide Pnces suti|ect to change 



3-D GRAPHICS DESIGN 

■^ Voted Best Graphics Program 
--Run Magaztnt 1388 

For Commodore 64/128 in 64 mode 
View Designs in Multiple Perspectives 




Professional-Educational-Home Applications 
Architects, Engineers, Designers, 
programmers, Students 
CAD-,lDn enter me inio Ihe fistesl growing Held in 
griphif technology, -At * special introductory price 
Sl^.^.'^ri!. Add S4.t>0 (or shipping <i.nd handling, l^or 
C.O.D. Jdd an ddditional S^.OO, (California resi- 
dents please include b< o ^aks lii.|. 

iht Software 

2269 CHESTNUT STREET 
SUITE 162 

SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94123 
ORDER LINE • (415) 923-1081 
FAX • (415) 92S-1084 
Dealers/Distributors inquiries welcomed. 



Circle Reader Service Number 184 



Circle Reader Service Number 115 



in which you are a tennis ball bounc- 
ing across a scrolling landscape. Next 
is Jack the Nipper II, the adventures 
of a diaper-sporting brat (according to 
the manual — my game would not 
run). Monty on the Run is the third — 
a game a la Goonies, in which Monty 
the Bear tries to escape to freedom. 
Bulldog is your basic flying space jet 
trying to oulmaneuver and outblast 
alien space stations. Krakout is next, a 
fancy pong game with a kick and a 
twist: You tr>' to obliterate blocks and 
aliens with your ball and bat. Be the 
hero in Future Knight and try to save 
your maiden fair. 

The second disk brings you Cos- 
mic Causeway, a rolling marble game; 
Trail blazer, a sort of Cosmic Cause- 
way for two; and North star, where 
you're responsible for resuming con- 
trol of space station North star, which 
has been overrun by aliens. Finally, 
taking up all of side 2 of the second 
disk is Thing Bounces Back — a rather 
indescribable game of mazes and 
slides, pipes and surprises, in which 
Thing (as apt a description of this 
springy gremlin as any) needs to col- 
lect parts of a computer program. 

Of the nine I could play, I found 
Monty, Krakout, Cosmic Causeway, 
and Thing to be the most fun, with 
Future Knight, Northstar, and Trail- 
blazer next. Rebounder and Bulldog 
were OK, too (they bear a close resem- 
blance to games designed with Shoot 
'Em Up Construction Kit). Music and 
graphics on all the games, though dif- 
fering in content and styles, were 
excellent. 

Krakout provides the most ad- 
justable variables, including options 
for screen color changes in time to the 
music's beat, scrolling, and bat speeds. 
It also boasts 100 screens. Monty on 
the Run is cute but challenging. Fm 
sure it can be done, but to be honest, I 
didn't make it past the second screen. 
Cosmic Causeway is real arcade fun 
and masterable enough to be satisfy- 
ing rather than frustrating. Thing 
Bounces Back is incredible. It's fun 
and playable, and it's charismatic 
along the lines of Tower Toppler, 

The manual to Mega Pack is 
brief but gives a pretty good rundown 



of each game — better than having a 
friend tell you how to play them. And 
hey — how often do you get on-the- 
spot instructions to arcade games 
anyway? 

Mega Pack provides a good cross 
section of games, something for every- 
body. It saves quarters, it saves wear 
and tear on the family car, and it 
keeps arcade addicts available for 
emergencies, like dinner and work, or 
school. It's a good value — and a lot of 
fun. 

ROBIN MINNICK 



Playability 4 

Documentation 3 

Originality . 4 

Graphics ................... 4 

Sound 5 



Commodore 64 or 128; joystick(s)- 
$34.95 

VIRGIN MASTERTRONIC 

18(K31 Cowan 

Ste.A 

Irvine, CA 9271 4 

(714)883-8710 



WINGS OF FDRY 

The F-6F Hellcat dives toward the 
treetops, releasing a cluster of 
bombs. Most of the bombs burst 
among the palm trees, but one 
scores a direct hit on an enemy dug- 
out, one of many that dot the island. 
A burst from the fighter's .50-caliber 
machine guns strafes the beach, and 
puffs of sand erupt among scattering 
soldiers. 





piFurVH 


l^=^,#ll 


m^/^m 



G-16 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



Best-Selling 

Commodore Books 

from COMPUTE 

Machine Language Routines for the 

Commodore 128 and 64 

By Todd D, Heimark and Patrick G. Parrish 

For both beginners and advanced ML programmers. 

585 pages. JI8.9S 

Mapping the Commodore 64 and 64C 

By Sheldon Leemon 

Comprehensive memory map and programmer's guide. 

324 pages. 118.95 

Music System for the Commodore 128 and 64 

The Enhanced Sidplayer 

By Craig Chamberlain 

Includes programs, utililies, and sample music. 

Book/Disk Only. 274 pages. $24.95 

Order your copies today. 

Send the appropriate amount plus $2 shipping and handling for 
each book ($4 Canadian, $6 foreign) and applicable sales tax* lo: 

COMPUTE Books 
C/0 CCC 

2500 McCiellan Ave. 
Pennsauken, NJ 08109 

•Residents of NC, NY, and NJ add appropriate sales lax for your area, 

Canadian Orders add 7% goods and services tax. 

All orders must be paid in U.S. funds drawn on a tJ.S. bank. Please allow 4-6 



weeks for dcUverv, 



MAY91CP 



JASON-RANHEIM 

CARTRIDGE MATERIALS 
FOR YOUR COMMODORE 64 or 128 

Quality Products 
from the World Leader! 

• Promenade C1 EPROM Programmer 

• Game Type Cartridges 

• Bank Switching Cartridges 

• RAM/ROM Combination Cartridges 

• Capture Archival Cartridge System 

• Cases, EPROMS, Erasers, Etc. 

Call or write for complete mformatlon! 



Call Toll Free 
from California 
Tech Support 



800-421-7731 
916-878-0785 
916-878-0785 



ES 



I 1 JASON-RANHEIM 

■ 3105 Gayle Lane 

Auburn, CA USA 95603 



circle Reader Service Number 216 



An enemy bunker in the jungle re- 
turns fire, and the plane is hit. Its oil 
pressure drops, and the pilot struggles 
in vain lo keep the plane's nose up. 
There's no chance of making it back to 
the carrier, and the Hellcat plows into 
the jungle floor. Smoke engulfs the 
plane, and its ammunition explodes. 

One plane down, two to go. The 
action is hotter than the Hellcat's six 
machine guns in Wings of Fury, Br0- 
derbund's new World War II action 
game for the 64. 

The time is 1944, and you are a 
Navy pilot aboard the USS Wasp, 
somewhere in the Pacific. After the 
game loads, cycle through seven naval 
ranks to select your mission. Midship- 
men have it the easiest with but one 
enemy-held island to attack. Move up 
in rank, and you go against enemy 
ships and fighter planes, plus numer- 
ous well-defended islands. 

Before takeoff, arm your Helical 
with bombs, rockets, or torpedoes. 
Bombs and rockets are good against 
the machine guns, but you'll need a 
torpedo to have any chance of sinking 
an enemy ship. Don't worry if you run 
out of ammunition before you com- 
plete your mission; you can always re- 
turn to the carrier and reload. You 
can land on a carrier, can't you? 


Carrier landings are tough. I've 
crashed into my ship more frequently 
than enemy bombs have. Taking off is 
a snap. Just give the plane full throttle 
and hope you have enough speed to 
stay in the air once you leave the flight 
deck. Everything is controlled with 
your joystick. 

You don't fly this game from the 
cockpit. Instead, you observe and con- 
trol the action from the side as your 
plane scrolls left and right. It*s almost 
like watching a war movie. 

The graphics in Wings of fury 
are pretty good. Your plane dips and 
dives over palm-covered islands as 
you try to eliminate enemy machine- 
gun bunkers that are firing at you. 
You have 30 bombs and plenty of bul- 
lets. The falling bombs, explosions, 
and plane crashes are detailed and 
entertaining. 

The game's sound effects don't 
come close to taxing the 64, however. 
Engine noises, enemy fire, and explo- 
sions are fine, but your machine guns 
are almost silent. Most of the innova- 
tive sound work comes from plane 
crashes and ditchings at sea, but your 
Helical's six machine guns sound 
much too puny. 

A panel at the bottom of the 
screen keeps track of your fuel, oil 


pressure, and number of bombs re- 
maining. It also keeps track of your 
score and the number of enemy 
planes you've shot down. There's also 
a small, forward-looking view that 
helps you with landing. 

Landings are the toughest part of 
this arcade game, but they don't de- 
tract from its overall appeal. You will 
have to hone your timing and reflexes, 
however, if you expect to bomb any- 
thing other than palm trees. 

The Hellcat is easy to fly, the ac- 
tion is fast paced, the missions range 
from easy to impossible, and the game 
restarts ver\' quickly. I just wish I 
could stop playing kamikaze with my 
own carrier every time I try to land. 

TOM NETSEL 


Playability 4 

Documentation , , . 3 

Originality 4 

Graphics . 3 


■ 


Commodore 64 or 128; joystick— $29.95 

BRGDERBUND 

17 Paul Dr. 

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(415)492-3200 H 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE G-17 




MACHINE LANGUAGE 



J I M 



BUTTER FIELD 



Ief s set aside serious study for the 
moment and have a little fun with 
a sinnple race game. Four horses 
will race across the screen, and the 
winner will be selected at random. 

One of the best ways to learn pro- 
gramming techniques is with a game^ 
because once you have finished enter- 
ing the bare-bones listing, youMl cer- 
tainly come up with ideas to make the 
game more elaborate. 

The BASIC loader will set up the 
program. The computer will wait for 
the jiffy clock to tick. The A register 
will contain the value of the low-order 
byte of this clock. Well wait in a tight 
loop until the clock changes. 

033C CMP $A2 
033E BEQ S033C 

Now the time has come to move 
a horse. Which horse? Pick it random- 
ly by tapping the noise oscillator. 

The noise oscillator will give a 
random value from to 255. That's 
too large a range, since we have only 
four horses. The obvious thing to do 
would be AND #$03, which would 
zero out unwanted bits and leave a 
random value from to 3. For rea- 
sons that will become clear soon, it's 
belter to start with an even number (0, 
2, 4, or 6). You can AND #$06 to get 
an even number in the right range. 



0340 
0343 



LDA SD41B 
AND #$06 



The A' position of the sprites may 
be found at $DODO and successive 
even addresses. Can you see how the 
even-number gimmick works? Thai's 
right; you slip the horse number into 
the X register and bump its position 
with an INC. After it's moved, you'll 
copy its position into Y. 

0345 TAX 

0346 INC SD000,X 
0349 LDY $D000,X 

Divide the random horse number 

by 2 with a Logical Shift Right (LSR) 
to reduce it to a number from to 3. 



Your objective is to change the sprite 
drawing to make the legs appear to 
move. 

The drawing for each sprite is set 
in the video matrix (screen memory). 
The standard address for sprite is 
$07F8 or 2040 decimal. For the horse 
in question, the picture number will 
switch. The EOR instruction is ideal 
for this kind of flip operation. 




034C LSR 

034D TAX 

034E LDA $07F8,X 

0351 EOR #$01 

0353 STA S07F8,X 

The selected horse has moved a 
pixel, and its legs have been adjusted. 
The horse's position is in register Y. If 
the value has reached $FF, the horse 
has reached the fmish line, and you 
can stop the race. You'll note that x 
position $FF is not the right-hand 
edge of the screen, by the way. The 
race could go further if you would 
write the routines necessary to adjust 
the A'-posilion high bit. But, in the in- 
terests of program simplicity, that 
project is left to you. To test Y, incre- 
ment it, and if it becomes 0, you'll 
know that the horse has run the course. 

0356 INY 

0357 BEQ $035E 

Assuming we have not branched 
ahead to end the race, we need to go 
back to the start and wait for the next 



jiffy ( 1/60 second). Load the jifly 
clock into the A register and hop back 
to the beginning. 

0359 LDA $A2 

035B CLC 

035C BCC S033C 

If the race is over, return to 
BASIC, where the program will pause. 



035E RTS 


100 


DATA 197,162,240,252,173 


110 


DATA 27,212,41,6,170,254 


120 


DATA 0,208,188,0,208,74 


130 


DATA 170,189,248,7,73,1 


140 


DATA 157,248,7,200,240,5 


150 


DATA 165,162,24,144,222 


160 


DATA 96 


170 


FOR J=828 TO 862: READ X 


180 


T=T+X:POKE J, X: NEXT J 


190 


IF T<>4770 THEN STOP 


200 


DATA 0,2,0,63,255,255,63 


210 


DATA 247,63,243,63,240,56 


2 20 


DATA 48,24,48,12,96,6,192 


230 


FOR J=0 TO 18 STEP 3 


240 


READ X,Y 


250 


POKE 896+J,X:P0KE 




897+J,Y:P0KF 89S+J,0 


260 


POKE 960+J,X:POKE 




96H-J,Y:POKE 962+J,0 


270 


NEXT J 


280 


FOR J==21 TO 27 STEP 3 


290 


READ X,Y 


300 


POKE B96-lrJ,X:POKE 




897+J,Y!POKE 898+J,0 


310 


POKE 961+J,X:POKE 




960+J,Y:POKE 962+J,0 


3 20 


NEXT J 


330 


FOR J=30 TO 60 STEP 3 


340 


POKE 896+J,0:POKE 




897+J,0:POKE 898+J,0 


350 


POKE 960+J,0:POKE 




961+J,0:POKE 962+J,0 


360 


NEXT J 


3 70 


FOR J=0 TO 3 


380 


POKE 53248+J*2,25 


390 


POKE 53249+J*2,J*30+80 


400 


POKE 53287+J,l 


410 


POKE 2040+J,15 


420 


NEXT J 


430 


POKE 54287,55 


440 


POKE 54290,129 


450 


POKE 54296,128 


460 


POKE 53269,15 


470 


PRINT CHR${147) 


480 


FOR J-1 TO 20:PRINT 




TAE(31)rCHR$(165):NEXT J 


490 


SYS 828 


500 


FOR J=l TO 5000;NEXT J 


510 


POKE 53269,0 q 



0-16 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



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BEGINNER BASIC 



LARRY COTTON 



He're in the middle of a pro- 
gram that prints your personal 
telephone directory on the 
screen and then dials a select- 
ed number when you hold the tele- 
phone's mouthpiece directly over the 
monitor's speaker. We'll pick up the 
program at line 200. 

200 PRINTTAB(3arPRESS 
210 PRINTTAB(30)"RETURN 
220 PRJNTTAB(30) *T0 DIAL 
230 PRINPiHOME]'^GOSUB350: 

GOSUB440 

Lines 200-220 are self-explanatory; 
line 230 returns the cursor to the up- 
per left corner of the screen and then 
calls two subroutines. This program 
has been renumbered, so I know 
which lines the subroutines will use. 
Normally, when you're writing a pro- 
gram from scratch, just put the sub- 
routines at high line numbers, such as 
1000 or 5000; you can then renumber 
the program later if you wish. Here's 
the first subroutine. 

350 READNS,NU$(C):IFN$=**QTHEN 

RETUR.N 
360 PRINTSPC(3)NSTAB(18)NU$(C) 
370 C-C+ LIFC>22THENPRINT^*NO 
MORE THAN 22 NAMES AND 
NUMBERSr^rEND 
380 GOTO350 

This is a four-line loop that reads and 

prints on the screen the names and 
numbers from lines of DATA while 
incrementing counter C. N$ is the per- 
son's name; NU$(C) becomes his or 
her corresponding telephone number. 
For each READ, an IF-THEN checks 
for a Q, which is an out-of-data signal. 
If a Q is read, the subroutine returns 
to line 230. Another IF-THEN in line 
370 checks for more than 22 names 
and numbers. 

We are filling what's called an in- 
dexed array, NU$(C), with telephone 
numbers; C is the index to that array. 
We'll discuss that in more detail in a 
moment. Now let's add some fake 
data to read, which you should replace 
with real names and numbers. 



390DATAJIM,nMllI 
400 DATABILL,222-2222 
410 DATAMIKE333-3333 
420 DATADAVE,444-4444 
430 DATAQ^O 

You can have as many as 22 names 
with corresponding telephone num- 
bers. Use lines 390 through 429 for 
your data. Since you'll probably want 
to call more than foiir people, number 
your data lines in increments smaller 
than 10, leaving line 430 as it is. 

Here's how the index variable C 
works. The position of a person's 
name on the screen, from the top of 
the list, determines the array's index 




number, beginning with 0. In our er- 
satz example, Jim's name, N$(0), will 
be printed on the first line from the 
top of the screen (line 0); his phone 
number, NU$(0) is 1 ll-l 1 1 1. Like- 
wise, Mike's name, N$(2), will be 
printed on the third line from the top 
of the screen; his phone number is 
333-3333, NU$(2). We'll use the those 
critical line numbers later to generate 
the telephone dialing tones. Here's the 
second subroutine, which controls a 
symbol (*) that points to the names. 

440 POKE214,Y:PRINT:POKE211,2: 

PRINP1SPC1" 
450 IFA$-**[lJPrTHENY=Y- 1:IFY 

<OTHENY=0 



460 IFA$="[D0WN]'THEN\=Y+1: 

IFY>C-1THENY=C-1 
470 POKE214,Y:PRINT:POKE211,2: 

PRINP**^':RETURN 

We want the symbol to appear 
first in the upper left corner of the 
screen, so we use this subroutine now. 
Lines 440 and 470 are the only ones 
used the first time through. 

Memory registers 2 1 4 and 2 1 1 on 
the 64 control the vertical and hori- 
zontal positions, respectively, of 
where something is printed on the 
screen. In the subroutine above, Y is 
the line number that the pointing 
symbol * is on. If Y=0, the * will be 
on the first screen line. (Remember, 
we're counting from 0.) POKE2I 1,2 is 
the same as PRINTTAB(2). 
PRINT^*[SPC]" erases the asterisk. 
We'll get to lines 450 and 460 in a 
minute after we return to the main 
body of the program. 

240 z=5a 

Z is the length of time each pair of 
tones will sound when dialing and is 
used later in a simple time-killing 
FOR-NEXT loop. Remember, the 
screen has been printed (subroutine 
350-380), and the * is pointing to the 
first name on the screen (subroutine 
lines 440-470). We now want to look 
at the keyboard, specifically the cur- 
sor-up and -down and Return keys. 

250GETA$:IFA$< >*iUPrTHENIFA$ 
< >"|DOWN]'THENIFA$< > 
CHR$(13)THEN250 

The cursor must move if the up- or 
down-cursor key has been pressed, so 
we use the subroutine at 440 again. 

260 IFA$=*iUPl"0RA$=*1D0WNr' 
THENGOSUB440:GOTO250 

Now lines 450 and 460 in that 
subroutine decrease or increase Y 
by 1, which effectively moves the * up 
or down. Once the * has been posi- 
tioned next to the desired name, Y 
has a particular value corresponding 



CS-20 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



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to the vertical position of the *, the 
screen line number. 

If the Return key has been 
pressed, control falls to Une 270. 

270 N$=NU$(Y) 

Remember that in line 350 we 
filled an NU$( ) array. Here's where 
we use Y to index the array. If, say, 
the * is on Hne 7 (the eighth line print- 
ed), N$ will become NU$(7)— the 
telephone number on line 7. 

The next seven lines contain 
three nested FOR-NEXT loops. Basi- 
cally, we want to scan the telephone 
number and have the computer play 
two tones for each digit scanned. 

280 F0RN=1T0LEN(NS);D$(N)= 

MID$(NS,N4) 
290 IFD$(N)-*^-"THENNEXT 
300 FORT= 1T04:P0KEF(T),W{T,(\AL 

(D$(N)})):NEXT 
310 POKEG,VN:POKEH,VN 
320FORT=1TOZ:NEXT 
330 POKEG,VF:POKEH,VF 
340NEXTKiOTO250 

In line 280, the outermost FOR- 
NEXT loop uses its variable N and 
MID$ to scan N$ (the phone number) 



one digit at a time. In the number 
638-3990, D$(3) will be 8. Line 290 
causes hvphens to be ignored. 

Using a nested FOR-NEXT loop 
and the VAL function, line 300 pokes 
two pairs of frequencies into the fre- 
quency control registers for voices 1 
and 2. Line 310 turns on voices 1 and 
2 with waveform 64, line 320 causes 
them to sound briefly, and line 330 
turns them off. Line 340 closes the 
outermost FOR-NEXT loop, which is 
scanning the digits. 

To use the program, carefuUy en- 
ter your DATA lines from 390 to 429. 
Youll probably want to use more 
than four people, so number your 
lines in increments smaller than 10. 
Run the program. A screen of names 
and numbers should appear, with an 
asterisk (*) to the left of the first one. 
Select a name with the up/down cur- 
sor key. Turn up the volume of your 
TV or monitor and press Return. You 
should hear touch-tone dialing tones. 

Now pick up the handset of a 
nearby phone, place the mouthpiece 
directly over your TV or monitor's 
speaker, and press Return again. If the 
volume is adjusted properly, the com- 
puter should dial the telephone. If not, 
adjust the volume and try again. E 



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MAY 1991 



COMPUTE G-21 



D 




ROGRAMMER'S PAGE 



RANDY 



THOMPSON 



What happened to the adage 
bigger is better? Unless you're 
discussing R.AM, the old Tex- 
an logic is lost on computer 
technology. Smaller circuits, smaller 
disks, and smaller pixels are the 
mainstay of today's modern computer 
systems. 

Let's have some fun this month 
and shift the wheels of micro-progress 
into reverse. The next lime some 128 
or IBM PC owners boasts of their 80- 
column display, ask them to show you 
something really impressive — say, 10- 
column text. 

The BASIC listing shown below 
creates a machine language routine 
for the 64 that prints characters four 
times their normal size. Use The 
Automatic Proofreader, found else- 
where in this section, to help elimi- 
nate typing errors. 



us 


10170 


DATA 009,208,1^3 
169,000,006,253 


r254. 


DS 


10180 


DATA 042,006,253 
006,253,042,024 


,042, 


XS 


19190 


DATA 101,254,133 
032, 048,193, 2f71 


r254. 


AR 


10200 


DATA 037,144,003 
021,193,160,090 


032, 


FK 


10210 


DATA 173,014,220 
254,141,014,220 


041, 


JA 


10220 


DATA 165,001,041 
133,001,177,253 


251, 


XF 


10230 


DATA 133,249,200 
253,133,250,200 


177, 



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10010 
10020 


■READ D:P0KE 


I,D:NEXT 


1 








■ 


■ 


DATA 


032 


,253 


,174 


r032. 


















158, 


173, 


036, 


013 




SF 


10240 I 


DATA 


16 5,00 


1,009, 


004, 


KA 


10030 


DATA 


048 


,006 


,032 


,221, 






133,(3 


01,173 


,014 








189, 


032, 


135, 


180 




QQ 


10250 I 


DATA 


220,00 


3,001, 


141, 


KR 


10040 


DATA 


032 


,166 


,182 


,133, 






314,2 


20,162 


,004 








252, 


169, 


255, 


133 




EB 


10260 I 


DATA 


134,00 


2,165 


199, 


FA 


10050 


DATA 


251 


,230 


,251 


,164, 






372,1 


69,000 


,006 








251, 


196, 


252, 


208 




JR 


10270 I 


DATA 


249,04 


2,00 6, 


249, 


HM 


10060 


DATA 


024 


,032 


,121 


,000, 






342, G 


06,250 


,042 








240, 


011, 


201, 


059 




JS 


10280 


DATA 


006,25 


3,042, 


170, 


BQ 


10070 


DATA 


208 


,217 


,032 


,115, 






189, G 


60,193 


,048 








000, 


208, 


212, 


240 




BQ 


10290 1 


DATA 


012,00 


9,128, 


162, 


XH 


10080 


DATA 


007 


,169 


,017 


r032. 






300,3 


28,199 


,208 








008, 


193, 


134, 


211 




QC 


10300 


DATA 


002,16 


2,018 


134, 


JX 


10090 


DATA 


096 


,177 


,034 


r20I, 






199, G 


32,210 


,255 








032, 


144, 


031, 


201 




JX 


10310 


DATA 


104,13 


3,199 


198, 


FG 


10100 


DATA 


064 


,144 


,042 


201, 






902,2 


08,211 


,169 








096, 


176, 


005, 


041 




AF 


10320 


DATA 


157,03 


2,008 


193, 


CE 


10110 


DATA 


191 


,076 


,109 


.192, 






169, r 


17,032 


,210 








201, 


128, 


176, 


004 




QR 


10330 


DATA 


255,19 


2,008 


2 08, 


EG 


10120 


DATA 


041 


,223 


,208 


,025, 






155, C 


J32,021 


,193 








201, 


160, 


144, 


006 




QM 


10340 


DATA 


169,14 


5,032 


008, 


GH 


10130 


DATA 


041 


,127 


,009 


r064. 






193, <> 


n6,025 


,192 








208, 


015, 


201, 


029 




BH 


10350 


DATA 


162,00 


4,032 


210, 


RK 


10140 


DATA 


208 


,005 


,032 


r0I7, 






255,; 


>02,208 


,250 








193, 


240, 


178, 


032 




KB 


10360 


DATA 


096,16 


2,001 


208, 


JR 


10150 


DATA 


210 


,255 


,076 


025, 






002,] 


.62,004 


,169 








192, 


133, 


253, 


17 3 




CA 


10370 


DATA 


029,03 


2,210 


,255, 


FJ 


10160 


DATA 


024 


,208 


,041 


002, 






032, e 


)48,193 


,208 








240, 


002, 


169, 


008 




JM 


10380 


DATA 


011, 


16 


9,017 


,032, 



210,255,032,210 
HP 10390 DATA 255,032,210,255, 

202,208,232,096 
BA 10400 DATA 165,211,201,040, 

144,003,056,233 
SG 10410 DATA 940,201,000,096, 

160,172,187,162 
KM 10420 DATA 188,033,063,062, 

190,191,161,060 
ER 10430 DATA 034,059,044,032, 

000 

Using this routine — appropriate- 
ly titled Big Text — is very much like 
using a PRINT statement. After 
you've run the BASIC loader above, 
simply type SYS 49152, followed by 
the item, or items, that you want to 
print in quotation marks. Note that 
you must use a comma to separate the 
SYS command and the item(s) being 
printed. For example, to print the 
name of your favorite magazine, enter 
the following line: 

SYS 49152, **COMPUTE" 

Numbers can be printed just as 
easily. For example, the following 
command prints the result of a simple 
mathematical formula. 

SYS49152,"2 + 2=*';2 + 2 

As with the PRINT command, 
you can use a semicolon to combine 
items being printed or to suppress the 
carriage return that is usually output 
at the end of each line. Because this 
program increases characters' size 
four times, carriage returns move the 
cursor down four lines instead of one. 

Special control characters, such 
as Crsr Up or Ctrl-6, can be printed by 
Big Text and often produce impres- 
sive results. Big Text can't use the 
TAB( ) and SPC( ) functions, however. 
Using commas outside of a string to 
advance the cursor doesn't work. 

Killer Birds 

To show oi^Big Text's capabilities, 
Fve written Flap Attack, a simple ar- 
cade game in which large, hostile birds 
(inspired by Hitchcock) are attacking 
earth and must be shot down. Ten 
points are awarded for each bird hit. 



G-22 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




PROGRAMMER'S PAGE 



FR 


L30 


MB 


140 


XA 


150 


RK 


160 


JG 


170 


RX 


180 


XF 


190 


GP 


200 



The score, the cannon, and the flying 
invaders are all created by using en- 
larged characters. 

The Flap Attack program is listed 
below. You must load and run Big 
Text before running this program. 

HK 100 REM FLAP ATTACK 

RS 110 CR$="{32 RIGHT}":CD$^" 

{21 DOWN}" 
GG 120 POKE 53280, 0:POKE 53281 

,0:BD$(0)="tn":BD$(l) = " 

SYS 49152, "{CLR} {BLU}SC 
0RE:"SC:SYS 49152, LEFT$ 
(CD$,16) "{WHT} 
{3 SPACESHAJfiSj'lYEL}" 
PRINT "{BLQ} {5 SPACES}P 
RESS THE SPACE BAR TO F 
IRE{YEL}"; 
FR=0:Y= (RND{.) *8)+5:FOR 

X=0 TO 32 
IF PEEK (197) =60 AND NOT 

FR THEN FR="1:G=18+X 
SYS 49152, "{HOMEl"LEFT$ 
(CDS, Y) LEFT $(CR$,X)BD$ ( 
XANDl) 

IF NOT FR THEN FOR P = {3 
{SPACE} TO 30: NEXT: GOTO 2 
40 

IF G"X=<4 THEN FR=0 
PRINT "{HOME}"TAB (17)LE 
FT$(CDS,G-X) "<>{DOWN} 
{2 LEFT} {2 SPACES}": IF 
{SPACE}G"X<>INT (Y)+2 TH 
EN240 

IF X<13 OR X>15 THEN240 
FOR 1=7 TO 23: POKE 646, 
I: SYS 49152, " {HOME }"LEF 
T$(CDS,Y)LEFT$(CR$,X) "* 
*":NEXT 
X=32:SC=SC+10 
NEXT:AT=AT + 1:IF SCO100 

THEN130 
PRINT "{CLR} {WHT} AFTER" 
AT "ATTACKS. . ." 
SYS49I52,"{4 DOWN} Y 
{DOWNlO{DOWN}U H{D0WN}A 
{ DO WN I V { DO WN } E " : S Y S 4 9 1 5 
2, "{3 SPACES|W{DOWN}0 
{D0WN}N" 

How B!g Text Works 

Without the 64*s extensive number of 
graphics characters, Big Text would 
not have been possible. To produce 
enlarged characters, this program uses 
graphics characters, instead of pixels, 
to draw a character's shape. The bit 
pattern of each character is retrieved 
from character ROM, located in 
memory at $DOOO-$DFFFE Next, 
the bit pattern is evaluated, and each 
2X2 block of pixels is converted into 
a single Commodore graphics charac- 
ter. Any 2X2 block can be represent- 
ed by one of 1 6 graphics characters. 

To speed up this pixel-to-charac- 
ter conversion, Big Text uses a lookup 
table consisting of the 16 possible 



CG 


2i0 


QJ 


220 


PJ 


230 


QB 


240 


EX 


250 


DP 


260 



characters. Each 2X2 pixel pattern is 
converted into a number and used as 
an index to retrieve and print the cor- 
responding graphics character. The 
accompanying figure shows the 16 
graphics characters used and the order 
in which they appear in the program's 
conversion table. Not only does this 
conversion table increase the pro- 
gram's speed, it also decreases the pro- 
gram size by reducing the amount of 
code required to locate the appropri- 
ate graphics character. And as we all 
know, when it comes to program size, 
bigger isn't always better. 



32 


Id 

172 


187 ; 162 


188 


182 


.Hi a 

; 191R ! 19eR 


190 


H 

191 


iDlB 

: 182R : 18eR 


162R 


9 

ie7R 


■m\m 

172R : 32R 



These 16 graphics characters can repre- 
sent any 2X2 bit pattern. Below each 
character is the character's Commodore 
ASCli value, ASCII values followed by the 
fetter R are displayed in reverse video. 
These characters are shown in the order in 
which they appear in the pixel-to-character 
conversion table. E 



Gazette is looking for utilities, 

games, applications, educational 
programs, and tutorial articles. If 
you've created a program that you 
think other readers might enjoy or 
find useful, send it on disk to 

Gazette Submissions Reviewer 
COMPUTE Publications 
324 W* Wendover Ave* 
Ste. 200 
Greensboro, NC 27408 

Please enclose an SASE if you wish 
to have the materials returned. 



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CIrcre Reader Service Number 161 




DIVERSIONS 



FRED D'IGNAZIO 



Recently, I was watching my 1 1- 
year-old son, Eric, sitting on the 
floor operating his Nintendo 
Game Boy. Suddenly Eric looked 
up and said, "Dad! I beat it! I finally 
beat Super Mario Land! " 

I went over and sat down beside 
Eric. It took a while for my 40-year- 
old eyeballs to adjust to the miniature 
display screen on the Game Boy, but 
eventually the screen came into focus. 

1 was stunned. For months Eric 
had been playing the Game Boy, and I 
had imagined that its display was only 
a slightly more sophisticated version 
of the little hand-held games you see 
at drugstores and electronics outlets. I 
was wrong. The action figures on Er- 
ic's display screen, though in black- 
and-white, were incredibly detailed. 
The game action was complex and 
nonstop, and the little tune was 
catchy, if a bit repetitive. 

The Game Boy is more than a 
toy. It's a full-scale computer! 

The battle over Nintendo has 
been raging across the U.S. for years, 
ever since Nintendo America came 
along and revived a near-dead elec- 
tronic-game industry. Educators, al- 
most without exception, are allied 
against Nintendo and against kids' 
playing Nintendo. Educators say that 
Nintendo keeps kids from doing their 
homework, warps their minds, turns 
them into couch potatoes, and dis- 
courages them from reading. 

All this may be true! 

On the other hand, educators' 
epithets have done nothing to stem 
the Nintendo tide. Almost every kid 
in America has played Nintendo, and 
most households now have a Nin- 
tendo or a Nintendo look-alike tucked 
away in some kid's bedroom. 

How many adults play Nin- 
tendo? Quite a few, judging by Nin- 
tendo's recent efforts to create adult- 
oriented games. However, whenever I 
speak at a national conference, I ask 
the crowd of 50-500 adults, "How 
many of you dare to come out of the 
closet and admit publicly that you like 
to play Nintendo and feel confident 
that you could whip a kid at it? 



The unbelievable thing is that 
IVe never had a single adult raise his 
or her hand when I ask this question. 
This indicates to me that Nintendo is 
very much a generational issue. Nin- 
tendo game playing, the fascination 
with Nintendo, and the growth of its 
market are all related to who our kids 
are and who we are not. Nintendo of- 
fers kids something powerful that we 
aren't offering them, something pow- 
erful they aren't getting elsewhere. 

What could that something be? 
Here are my guesses. 

Power* The first is power: power 
to enter a simulated world where they 
are the top dog, where their decisions 




count, where the world's very exis- 
tence is dependent on them. 

Compiex!t>', Simulated experi- 
ences that are so complex and so de- 
manding that they challenge today's 
TV babies to give their undivided at- 
tention and to call upon every nook 
and cranny of their intelligence — or 
die (at least for a few seconds). 

Context. Unlike their school 
days, children's Nintendo experiences 
are rich in context. Kids sees them- 
selves acting in the role of one of the 
game characters. They know roughly 
what the game's goal is and how 



they're going to get there. They follow 
this character through a simulated 
three-dimensional landscape full of 
milestones and markers that tell them 
how much progress they've made to- 
ward their goals. They are on a quest, 
and this quest has meaning. 

Control* Adults who think chil- 
dren play Nintendo for fun haven't 
spent enough time watching their chil- 
dren play Nintendo. Children take 
their Nintendos very seriously. Often 
while Eric is playing, I hear cries, 
grunts, cheers, and groans, depending 
on how a game is going. Eric measures 
his overt success by how long he can 
stay alive and how far toward an ulti- 
mate level he can travel His deeper, 
more sustained quest in all Nintendo 
games is toward mastery, competence, 
and control over the reality of the 
Nintendo game world. 

Mystery. Mystery is what makes 
Nintendo fun. The environment must 
be unpredictable to be challenging. If 
it's a good game, no one really knows 
every step through it. At any point, 
the next step may be successful — or it 
may be your last. 

It is critical that some adult has 
not been there before you and now 
waits (like a teacher in the front of the 
room) for you to struggle to catch up. 
The world is a mystery, full of invisi- 
ble buttons and dangers that leap out 
from all sides, and you have to master 
a game world by mapping it out. The 
only way to map it out is, through an 
endless series of game voyages into 
the wilderness, to be struck down 
again and again. Each time you go 
back, make it a little farther through 
the world before the game 'Wou" is 
sacrificed on the altar of discovery. 

It's my opinion that the Nin- 
tendo system is far more important 
than most of the adult wodd realizes. 
I believe computer games could form 
the basis for a new schooling expe- 
rience for kids and maybe for us 
adults as well. It represents a new 
architecture of knowledge — a new 
way to map knowledge for the learner 
and a new way for the learner to navi- 
gate through knowledge. Q 



G-24 COMPUTE MAY 1991 




D 



ROGRAMS 



MARK 



N E R t 



I ordred, an evii wizard, has sto- 
len the Great Cup of Caslalia, 
plunging all the land into dark- 
ness. You have learned that the 
cup is hidden in a great underground 
castle. To recover the cup, you must 
make your way through many caves 
and caverns leading to the castle. The 
journey will be difficult; the caves are 
filled with goblins and traps. Can you 
return the cup and restore order to the 
world? 

That is the story behind Castalia, 
an excellent arcade/slrategy/ad ven- 
ture game. Cast alia combines fast 
play, colorful graphics, and many lev- 
els to create a great game. 

Getting Started 

To enter Castalia, you'll need to use 
MLX, our machine language entry 
program; see '^Typing Aids" elsewhere 
in this section. When MLA" prompts 
you, respond with the values given 
below. 

Starting address: ICOl 
Ending address: 3478 

Be sure to save a copy of the game 
before you exit MLX. 

Although Casta! ia is written in 
machine language, it loads and runs 
like a BASIC program. After you've 
loaded and run the game, the first lev- 
el will appear with your character in 
the lower left corner of the screen. 
Move it using a joystick in port 2. 

Goblin Cheese 

The caves you must traverse are made 
of different building materials. It will 
take some time for you to become fa- 
miliar with them and to know what 
you can and cannot do. The purple 
blocks are cave walls, which you can- 
not go through. The red bricks are 
impenetrable unless you have super- 
strength (see below). 

If s possible to move through 
brown dirt, and gray boulders can be 
pushed to one side, providing there is 
space available. White doors are mag- 
ic. You can pass through one unless 
you're carrying a boulder. The green 



material that looks like dirt is goblin 
cheese. You cannot go through it, but 
goblins can eat a passage through. 

Can You Spare a Spell? 

Many types of treasure found in the 
caverns will help you on your journey. 
Yellow coins are the most abundant. 
Watch for white coins; each of them is 
worth ten of the yellow ones. You 
may also find white healing potions 
marked with an L. These restore one 
unit of your character's life force.vThe 
red superstrength potion allows you to 



EVADE THE GOBLINS 

IN THIS EXCITING, 

FAST-PACED ARCADE 

ADVENTURE FOR THE 

64. JOYSTICK 

REQUIRED. 



break any red bricks that get in your 
way. Collect an orange fireball spell, 
and you can shoot five deadly fireballs 
at goblins. Look for a light blue hel- 
met and armor; each will limit the 
amount of damage goblins and their 
fireballs can inflict. 

Goblins are the blue creatures 
that patrol the caverns. They are dan- 
gerous and will cause you to lose three 
units of life force unless you have the 
blue helmet or armor. You can kill 
goblins by shooting them with fireballs. 
If you trap a goblin so it can no longer 
move, it will turn into a white coin. 

Magical Moments 

In some caves, youMl find magical 
statues that shoot fireballs. These fire- 
balls will take three units of your life 
force unless you have the helmet or 



armor. If you stand directly in front of 
a statue, its fireballs won't be able to 
hit you. 

Other magical items include tele- 
porters. They are cyan, purple, blue, 
or green and resemble doors. Tele- 
porters will take you to various places 
throughout the caves. Sometimes, 
these leleporters will be blocked by 
locked doors. To open these doors, 
you must find the key of the same 
color. 

There are two types of toll booths 
between you and many treasures. The 
while booths cost 100 yellow coins to 
pass through; the yellow ones cost 10. 

Your status appears across the 
top of the screen. At the left is the 
amount of time you have left with su- 
perstrength, followed by the number 
of superstrength potions youVe carry- 
ing. The number by the fireball potion 
is the number of fireballs you have. 
Next, the healing potion shows the 
amount of life force you have remain- 
ing. Any keys or armor you have will 
be displayed next, followed by the 
number of coins you have collected. 

Tips on Playing 

Pressing the space bar during play 
pauses the game. While it's paused, 
you can push the joystick left or right 
to select a fire-button function. A gray 
border means you can press the fire 
button to carr>' a boulder and release 
it to drop the boulder, an orange bor- 
der means you'll shoot a fireball when 
you press the fire button, and a red 
border means that if you press the 
button, you'll drink a superstrength 
potion. The screen will flash while 
you have superstrength. Press the fire 
button to restart the game. Press Q 
while the game is paused to start over. 
If your life force drops to 0, your 
character dies. Press the fire button to 
restart the game, or press Run/Stop- 
Restore to leave the program. When 
you restart, you lose all of your coins 
and potions, but you retain your keys 
and armor. 

Helpful Hints 

Castalia is a challenging game, but it 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 0>23 



D 




ROGRAMS 



can be solved if you take it bit by bit. 
Since you don't lose your keys or ar- 
mor when you die, they are valuable. 
Once you've found a key, you can 
teleport past caves blocked by locked 
doors. 

In many caves, goblin cheese will 
block your way. Move boulders so 
that the goblins will eat the cheese for 
you. Be careful if you leleport out of a 
cave when a goblin is about to get 
you. It will be waiting for you if you 
return. 

Whenever possible, dispose of 
the goblins by trapping them with 
boulders so that you can gel the white 
coins. Use fireballs only when neces- 
sar>'. When dealing with goblins in 
tight spaces, study their movements 
and try to fmd a safe place to stand so 
you can shoot them. 

Use your superstrength potion 
sparingly. There are many places to 
use it, but not much potion. 

Castalia is a fairly long game to 
type in, but its numerous features will 
keep dedicated game players busy for 
hours. It's filled with many little tricks 
that you'll learn after you Ve played 
the game a few times. Good luck. 



CASTALIA 



IC09: 
ICII: 
1C19: 
1C21: 
1C29: 
1C31: 
LC39! 
1C41: 
LC4 9: 
1C51: 
1C59: 
1C61: 
1C69: 
1C71: 
1C79: 
1C81: 
1C89: 
1C91: 
1C99: 
ICAl: 
1CA9: 
LCBl: 
iCB9: 
ICCl^ 
ICC 9: 
ICDl: 
1CD9: 
ICEl; 
ICE 9: 
ICFl; 
1CF9: 
1D01: 
1D09! 
IDll: 
1D19: 
1D21: 



0B iC 
37 00 
20 20 
30 08 
99 33 
B9 00 
F7 A9 
2E 4C 
27 EF 
07 C8 
05 01 
20 34 
16 A2 
A2 04 
10 05 
A8 A5 
F7 A5 
A5 F8 
E8 20 
20 34 
A6 18 
A5 FD 
03 4C 
D0 IC 
34 03 
03 4C 
03 E6 
34 03 
18 69 
34 03 
03 18 
20 34 
A7 A4 
26 A7 
60 4 8 
85 FB 
FF C6 



70 17 9E 
00 00 20 
20 20 20 
99 F8 00 
03 88 D0 
08 99 FF 
13 85 2D 

00 01 19 
IE B9 6E 
D0 F7 EE 
C6 F9 D0 
03 F0 33 

01 20 34 
20 34 03 
A2 0A 20 
A7 85 A9 
FF 85 F8 
85 FF A5 
34 03 D0 

03 A0 02 
A5 FC 65 
65 A7 85 
13 01 EB 
A0 03 84 
F0 08 A2 
5C 01 A2 
A7 4C 50 
D0 0A E8 

04 A8 D0 
D0 0A A2 
69 06 D0 
3 D0 E6 
FB F0 0C 
C6 FB CA 
Bl FE 85 
68 A4 FE 
FE C0 E7 



32 34 
20 20 
A0 C4 
B9 FD 
Fl A0 
03 88 
A9 27 
A0 02 
09 99 

02 01 
ED A2 
C9 07 

03 D0 
18 69 
34 03 
A5 FE 
20 60 
F7 85 
IE A2 
84 A8 
A6 85 
F8 20 
20 34 
A8 E8 
08 20 
0B 20 

01 E8 
20 34 
D6 E8 

02 20 
ED A2 
A 9 00 
06 FA 
D0 F2 
FA A9 
00 02 
D0 DE 



30 9B 
20 BE 
B9 2E 

08 IF 

09 74 
00 C9 
85 6E 
13 0E 
E8 IC 
EE 41 
03 4B 
D0 BO 
0A C8 

07 8D 
85 4 5 
85 24 
03 9B 
FE 9A 

08 49 
85 52 
F7 80 
6C 18 
03 24 
20 5E 
34 ID 
34 E7 
20 D7 
03 DA 
20 5F 
34 49 
08 CA 
85 20 
2A 5F 
A8 01 
08 27 
C6 72 
A4 DD 



ID 2 9 


:FF 


C0 


07 


D0 


08 


A9 


37 


85 


E2 


1F99 


;53 


34 


1D31 


:01 


58 


4C 


0D 


08 


A4 


A3 


F0 


71 


IFAI 


:D2 


8D 


1D39 


:22 


A5 


F7 


38 


E5 


A8 


B3 


03 


A6 


1FA9 


:24 


17 


ID 41 


:C6 


Fa 


38 


85 


F7 


A5 


FC 


E5 


B2 


IFBl 


:Ea 


F0 


ID49 


:A8 


B0 


02 


C6 


FD 


85 


FC 


Bl 


62 


1FB9 


:E0 


E9 


ID51 


:F7 


88 


91 


FC 


98 


D0 


F8 


C4 


6A 


IFCl 


:4g 


0E 


1D59 


:A9 


F0 


0A 


Bl 


F7 


C6 


FD 


C6 


9£ 


IFC9 


:8D 


52 


1D61 


:F8 


C6 


A9 


10 


EC 


60 


73 


£6 


C0 


IFDl 


:CC 


5A 


1D69 


:01 


4C 


16 


08 


60 


00 


0B 


08 


9B 


1FD9 


:00 


A0 


ID 71 


:0A 


00 


9E 


32 


30 


36 


31 


E3 


48 


IFEI 


:29 


FC 


ID 7 9 


.08 


78 


A9 


02 


E7 


4A 


A2 


F0 


4B 


IFE9 


:A4 


82 


1D81 


BD 


31 


11 


54 


27 


9D 


FF 


2B 


29 


IFFl 


:CC 


BE 


1D89 


BD 


21 


12 


00 


B8 


28 


9D 


EF 


BE 


1FF9 


:59 


C9 


1D91 


2C 


00 


2A 


EB 


A2 


51 


BD 


7F 


3B 


2001 


:7C 


48 


1D99 


Dl 


9D 


7F 


29 


10 


BF 


F7 


90 


A6 


2009 


:03 


0E 


IDAI 


0B 


85 


01 


lA 


9E 


A9 


lA 


8D 


El 


2011 


:B9 


F2 


1DA9 


IE 


IF 


2C 


A2 


06 


9D 


93 


CA 


0D 


2019 


;4F 


69 


IDBl 


D0 


FA 


A9 


06 


8A 


EA 


3C 


34 


55 


2021 


:04 


63 


1DB9' 


02 


3D 


22 


00 


CE 


70 


39 


62 


95 


2029 


40 


C6 


IDCl: 


A4 


44 


6A 


91 


5B 


62 


52 


84 


53 


2031 


^7B 


90 


1DC9: 


AA 


8D 


98 


2C 


18 


2D 


DC 


A9 


6B 


20 3 9 


:17 


12 


IDDI: 


0C 


43 


C5 


91 


C8 


28 


D6 


44 


8D 


2041 


3F 


18 


1DD9: 


0C 


0F 


20 


62 


0F 


20 


46 


17 


A4 


2049' 


F0 


5E 


IDEI; 


B2 


45 


38 


04 


7F 


02 


07 


4 2 


62 


2051 


8D 


66 


IDE 9; 


9C 


A9 


3A 


71 


C3 


F8 


0D 


31 


88 j 


2059' 


D8 


A9 


IDFl; 


ID 


00 


DF 


C0 


4D 


93 


6A 


4C 


9F 


2061: 


4B 


60 


1DF9: 


79 


7E 


Al 


4C 


48 


38 


13 


DO 


AD 


2069: 


A5 


4F 


1E01: 


15 


F0 


ID 


07 


03 


CD 


4B 


8F 


8D 


2071: 


0F 


55 


1E09: 


02 


D5 


08 


58 


62 


5C 


A5 


4F 


61 


2079: 


5B 


13 


lEll: 


85 


5D 


65 


65 


43 


04 


E6 


4E 


B0 


2081: 


91 


54 


1E19: 


E6 


4C 


D0 


04 


E6 


4D 


35 


FC 


0A 


2089; 


44 


4C 


1E21: 


57 


44 


Bl 


CA 


A9 


C3 


F0 


72 


AD 


2091: 


A0 


21 


1E29: 


C4 


A5 


5C 


C5 


AD 


A5 


50 


00 


A8 


2099: 


8E 


90 


1E31: 


0A 


7C 


09 


43 


30 


16 


C9 


0A 


5E 


20A1: 


BC 


A2 


IE 39: 


F0 


12 


AD 


52 


83 


23 


41 


03 


7B 


20A9: 


E6 


4P 


1E41: 


A9 


50 


38 


ED 


B0 


8D 


4C 


00 


AO 


20B1: 


A9 


07 


1E49: 


71 


9D 


08 


10 


3F 


89 


BD 


62 


A5 


20B9: 


0C 


4C 


1E51: 


C7 


C4 


8C 


AD 


71 


F2 


43 


2C 


19 


20C1: 


8A 


IB 


1E59: 


05 


E3 


04 


46 


0C 


A3 


9A 


44 


5E 


20C9: 


80 


99 


1E6X: 


18 


00 


FE 


09 


96 


0E 


24 


00 


4F 


20D1: 


F3 


05 


1E69; 


5E 


75 


0E 


13 


D4 


84 


28 


71 


9F 


20D9: 


06 


58 


IE 71: 


53 


09 


AB 


54 


59 


03 


D0 


lA 


E6 


20E1: 


F0 


lA 


1E79: 


33 


17 


A0 


8D 


43 


lA 


40 


E3 


E8 


20E9: 


50 


45 


1E81: 


D0 


08 


AD 


5A 


CE 


40 


90 


69 


85 


20F1: 


22 


44 


1E89: 


89 


A3 


27 


03 


10 


C4 


05 


E9 


10 


23F9: 


00 


8D 


1E91: 


0E 


81 


F0 


0A 


Al 


9A 


0C 


A6 


2 A 


2101: 


38 


80 


1E99: 


26 


99 


A7 


06 


B4 


36 


BC 


4 3 


DF 


2109: 


55 


12 


lEAl: 


87 


16 


FC 


81 


80 


8D 


69 


60 


4C 


2111: 


C8 


3D 


1EA9: 


C0 


AF 


8C 


11 


01 


DE 


AA 


29 


D6 


2119: 


03 


01 


lEBl: 


7C 


C9 


10 


Bl 


67 


45 


02 


80 


90 


2121: 


ID 


04 


1EB9: 


06 


20 


0D 


75 


4B 


F4 


09 


8A 


C4 


2129: 


A 8 


A2 


lECl: 


86 


IE 


C9 


15 


F0 


lA 


AC 


5F 


FB 


2131: 


89 


53 


1EC9: 


67 


C8 


98 


10 


04 


cc 


51 


A 8 


9E 


2139: 


22 


OF 


lEDl: 


97 


AC 


09 


A9 


14 


cc 


CA 


C0 


EA 


2141: 


A9 


22 


iED9: 


FB 


09 


AD 


4E 


D9 


80 


2D 


06 


22 


2149; 


CE 


90 


lEEl: 


C5 


79 


46 


64 


E4 


00 


DC 


8D 


DC 


2151: 


0F 


98 


1EE9: 


9B 


29 


10 


AA 


4D 


40 


01 


8E 


E6 


2159: 


04 


98 


lEFl: 


42 


E2 


CC 


3B 


0E 


22 


ID 


43 


CB 


2161: 


DO 


E9 


1EF9; 


03 


49 


FF 


29 


0F 


36 


AE 


10 


SB 


2169: 


20 


E4 


1F01: 


0B 


79 


81 


F8 


IF 


86 


01 


00 


F7 


2171: 


51 


D0 


1F09: 


0D 


8C 


9E 


94 


4E 


8D 


50 


0B 


62 


2179: 


61 


A7 


IFll: 


7F 


C9 


08 


B0 


65 


E2 


06 


69 


B9 


2181: 


A 8 


4B 


1F19: 


3F 


B3 


08 


26 


76 


B9 


57 


44 


D4 


2189: 


0D 


10 


1F21: 


56 


B9 


58 


0A 


80 


FA 


D2 


F2 


2D 


2191: 


D2 


0D 


1F29: 


0B 


0C 


OC 


5C 


42 


0C 


27 


0C 


D3 


2199: 


E2 


58 


IF31: 


IF 


Dl 


82 


D8 


26 


Al 


68 


39 


63 


21A1: 


B0 


41 


1F39: 


BD 


0B 


AB 


ID 


0B 


30 


C4 


06 


09 


21A9' 


C2 


00 


1F41: 


32 


02 


0B 


55 


0B 


60 


20 


23 


3D 


21B1: 


55 


20 


IF49: 


E5 


0A 


9F 


0A 


07 


0B 


12 


0B 


25 


21B9: 


F0 


B0 


1F51: 


A7 


80 


F3 


40 


46 


0A 


F6 


0A 


F8 


21C1 


AC 


79 


1F59: 


80 


0D 


64 


04 


C0 


59 


El 


54 


6B 


21C9 


4C 


ID 


lF6l! 


47 


EB 


ic 


92 


90 


83 


12 


AD 


4F 


21D1 


*G1 


38 


1F69: 


4C 


70 


F9 


89 


D0 


04 


86 


64 


C9 


21D9 


D8 


90 


1F71: 


4D 


03 


09 


84 


9C 


0A 


A5 


D2 


AB 


21E1 


:68 


4C 


1F79: 


07 


51 


ID 


09 


91 


50 


CA 


04 


2B 


21E9 


:34 


10 


1F81: 


52 


91 


4E 


52 


05 


06 


C4 


C6 


CC 


2IF1 


:30 


99 


1F89: 


99 


86 


38 


80 


C9 


ic 


A8 


29 


7E 


21F9 


:53 


09 


1F91' 


72 


55 


DB 


60 


65 


A0 


6C 


28 


8E 


2201 


:56 


B9 



0A 73 
23 2 3 

IE OC 
16 50 
3C 80 

97 82 
03 OA 
74 EA 
28 Bl 
C9 04 

21 2B 
E3 E6 
08 DO 
18 A8 

35 13 
10 8D 
0A Fl 

26 A3 
85 47 
05 B0 
71 F4 
70 Dl 
D2 F8 
IC DO 

02 B7 
A2 28 
E9 00 
0E D6 
A9 SB 
4E 38 
82 OC 
90 0C 
C8 51 
60 C0 
A9 C0 
C5 4F 

25 09 
80 99 
F9 04 
8A 39 
El 4C 
AA AD 
8A F8 

22 08 
21 D0 
39 01 
21 3C 
39 23 
39 28 
E4 20 
20 26 

68 22 

27 22 

23 04 
54 A0 
0A AA 
7A 04 
4C 87 
FF 95 

69 96 
AC 5A 

26 04 
IC A2 

98 29 

03 CD 

08 C0 
53 CD 

36 8 A 
4C EB 
78 B9 

09 0C 
ED 4 9 
05 AD 
51 0F 

00 04 

01 04 

37 D0 
53 0E 



84 83 
0B 27 
C9 0A 
01 66 
IB 85 
0C AD 
0A B4 
04 85 

58 45 
DO 36 
81 5A 

59 E6 
D9 AD 
BC 48 
6D 40 
41 6C 
A4 A5 
26 lA 

01 64 
OA 46 

07 43 
38 AE 

68 D2 

69 98 
A6 78 

8 5 50 
85 51 
C4 Bl 
91 50 
2E 00 
A9 20 
AO 23 
14 84 
83 E6 
C5 4E 

60 DE 
AS FB 
FF 03 
80 19 
80 OA 
DD AA 

04 12 
85 OF 

05 4C 
8D 3E 
99 8D 
97 03 
90 33 
IE A0 
8 3 38 
0E BB 
21 72 
AD 67 
A9 20 
04 B9 
A9 IC 
9D 11 
0D 20 
BE 00 
Bl AD 
78 8C 
D0 0D 

02 DO 
08 DO 
AO 0C 
CA IC 
4 2 F0 
85 0C 
OD IC 
0A 0E 
08 02 

03 8D 
48 94 
60 04 
B2 9C 
60 2A 
13 B9 
95 57 



54 03 E4 

19 18 82 
B0 05 21 

84 01 14 
C5 41 2E 
F0 96 4E 

38 44 3C 
S9 A2 05 
71 85 AO 

20 4C 59 
E6 58 8D 
5B A5 F3 
4A Dl 51 
A4 40 3A 
06 A8 97 
89 08 9C 

78 D0 39 
19 48 4F 

05 C8 53 
C4 BC AE 
23 A3 36 
10 6B 5A 
SB ED 17 

6 3 18 IB 
0C A5 01 

85 54 84 
22 27 6A 
50 16 61 
A9 0C 47 
28 85 34 
74 OF D5 
73 21 EA 
AC 4C CB 

39 02 2D 
D0 09 84 
10 87 8C 
A2 7F 02 
80 19 DD 
80 99 33 
99 ED 7F 

79 CI 82 
49 02 4E 
D8 A6 45 

04 7A F4 

62 21 lA 
59 A6 13 
25 39 AE 
3F 9C 0E 
08 41 BB 
A0 0C DB 
41 SO 3E 
08 20 3F 
A2 0D B4 
39 C0 86 
54 94 EF 

63 03 B4 
D8 88 BE 
9F FF B0 

07 C9 IC 

39 DO AE 
A8 9A 73 
CE 02 4A 
A2 4C E8 
0F EE 86 

40 OA 60 
07 AD IC 
BF 4 2A 
C9 OC 12 
0E 06 E3 
8D D0 D7 
98 A9 7E 
40 0B 2F 

05 68 2F 
F8 13 9E 
40 90 A3 
47 0A 57 
52 48 88 
6C 56 E2 



G-26 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




PROGRAMS 



2209:00 


69 


0E 


B2 


0E 


FD 


0E 


AD 


CG 


2479;1C 


10 


IC 


0C 


AC 


3F 


F0 


70 


CF 


26E9:4D 


08 


06 


72 


56 


D2 45 


50 9F 


2211: 


20 


7D 


F0 


33 


98 


BC 


05 


4C 


24 


2481: 


C7 


IC 


18 


10 


80 


41 


80 


28 


EA 


26Fl:A4 


2D 


61 


68 


SB 


67 23 


67 B4 


2219: 


F5 


0E 


C9 


02 


40 


63 


6D 


0B 


AA 


2489; 


BD 


24 


24 


66 


C7 


26 


18 


00 


AB 


26F9:67 


40 


32 


42 


08 


60 31 


76 05 


2221: 


F8 


98 


14 


A9 


IB 


26 


05 


lA 


AA 


2491: 


54 


08 


18 


3A 


BD 


Al 


B9 


30 


C4 


2701:75 


76 


76 


E3 


09 


AB 60 


23 A0 


2229: 


98 


20 


34 


26 


A9 


01 


15 


59 


7F 


2499: 


lA 


78 


9D 


69 


CC 


85 


B8 


FF 


45 


2709:95 


34 


0B 


19 


2A 


E0 05 


5A 5B 


2231' 


IC 


31 


17 


F0 


3E 


C4 


70 


00 


A7 


24A1: 


EC 


AA 


8E 


75 


F3 


B7 


FF 


F7 


AA 


2711:06 


44 


23 


E5 


8E 


04 05 


14 5A 


2239' 


81 


C5 


57 


Fl 


40 


24 


74 


0B 


40 


24A9: 


9C 


87 


9F 


3A 


06 


FD 


00 


DF 


01 


2719:31 


42 


2D 


50 


50 


88 27 


10 C6 


2241- 


22 


53 


08 


AD 


35 


29 


90 


5D 


14 ! 


24B1: 


F2 


2E 


El 


B5 


81 


IE 


9P 


Al 


FB 


2721:42 


35 


46 


3A 


00 


12 6D 


45 99 


2249 


08 


15 


28 


20 


B4 


CI 


30 


Bl 


9C 


24B9: 


E6 


3C 


7A 


6E 


SA 


14 


IB 


20 


34 


2729:08 


55 


62 


D5 


04 


A6 DF 


55 4A 


2251 


4E 


C9 


20 


D0 


23 


AC 


07 


37 


51 


24C1: 


00 


0E 


37 


EB 


DF 


35 


0E 


01 


24 


2731:07 


26 


06 


70 


41 


04 83 


2A 8B 


2259 


B9 


AA 


10 


A8 


AD 


40 


03 


00 


5A 


24C9: 


73 


18 


20 


34 


SA 


76 


5E 


3C 


02 


2739:84 


A8 


48 


59 


S8 


53 EE 


IE A2 


2261 


XE 


90 


25 


lA 


85 


21 


88 


13 


4C 


2401: 


00 


70 


AO 


FB 


D7 


EC 


70 


84 


63 


2741:68 


B4 


96 


B0 


8F 


86 03 


30 9B 


2269 


.28 


80 


93 


46 


9C 


93 


00 


E6 


D2 


24D9: 


73 


B0 


02 


14 


7 A 


20 


AB 


DO 


13 


2749:EA 


84 


23 


88 


B6 


40 00 


82 54 


2271 


,A4 


89 


29 


48 


45 


9A 


83 


8C 


FB 


24E1: 


6B 


BC 


6B 


B6 


EB 


5D 


4B 


F8 


40 


2751:75 


50 


17 


D0 


10 


2F 8F 


85 43 


2279 


:86 


D0 


26 


15 


0A 


A9 


99 


SD 


03 


24E9: 


41 


Fl 


3D 


8D 


40 


07 


Al 


Al 


DO 


2759:31 


8C 


0D 


23 


28 


8E DB 


12 A4 


2281 


i3F 


03 


F8 


AD 


84 


78 


38 


E9 


80 


24F1: 


Al 


9D 


95 


9D 


FO 


10 


E2 


71 


5E 


2761 :AE 


CI 


10 


80 


6D 


F0 99 


C3 A7 


2239 


:01 


8D 


47 


03 


D8 


A9 


04 


20 


60 


24F9: 


50 


C7 


0D 


08 


15 


3C 


FF 


CD 


E5 


2769:01 


02 


A4 


84 


A4 


30 F7 


02 9F 


2291 


:6D 


10 


81 


F2 


27 


8D 


44 


03 


EA 


2501: 


43 


88 


07 


41 


30 


24 


5D 


58 


Al 


2771:47 


47 


34 


03 


A3 


B0 05 


29 0B 


2299 


:A9 


10 


8D 


42 


E0 


6C 


9F 


0C 


90 


2509: 


38 


18 


38 


DD 


40 


46 


00 


00 


75 


2779:52 


94 


D7 


00 


B3 


00 46 


IF 48 


22A1 


:91 


76 


03 


42 


8C 


60 


2C 


A5 


B4 


2511: 


00 


ID 


80 


00 


10 


81 


EC 


IS 


8B 


2781:B3 


39 


4E 


20 


69 


06 E7 


2A 21 


22A9 


:4E 


85 


52 


A5 


4F 


18 


69 


D4 


9D 


2519: 


BD 


A5 


A5 


D8 


99 


AS 


03 


C3 


90 


2789; 06 


23 


0B 


IF 


49 


54 EA 


55 BD 


22B1 


:85 


S3 


90 


37 


29 


7F 


A8 


B9 


65 


2521: 


A5 


99 


01 


3F 


84 


78 


IC 


D4 


OB 


2791:F1 


25 


50 


00 


D5 


IF 04 


28 96 


22B9 


:BE 


10 


D4 


07 


91 


52 


AD 


4F 


EC 


2529; 


31 


BD 


DB 


40 


0A 


DB 


BD 


FF 


36 


2799:03 


BE 


50 


DC 


14 


00 28 


41 53 


22C1 


:03 


AC 


50 


05 


F7 


60 


16 


83 


FD 


2531: 


36 


91 


3C 


7E 


45 


C0 


E0 


F0 


4A 


27Al:F4 


20 


5A 


26 


50 


B0 64 


04 FS 


22C9 


:D0 


F9 


AD 


00 


DC 


29 


10 


F0 


47 


2539: 


60 


04 


F0 


E0 


C0 


A 6 


7E 


30 


BA 


27A9:F7 


41 


FC 


91 


0E 


11 95 


A2 7F 


22D1 


1F9 


4C 


4K 


08 


A9 


92 


7D 


9E 


Al 


2541: 


40 


01 


18 


18 


03 


07 


0F 


FF 


C2 


27B1:95 


35 


87 


50 


90 


98 34 


31 EE 


22D9 


:12 


D3 


E4 


40 


CA 


46 


5B 


8C 


6F 


2549; 


FF 


0F 


07 


03 


C6 


41 


A8 


65 


5 A 


27B9:1C 


65 


A2 


15 


E2 


08 F0 


45 73 


22r:i 


:C4 


80 


AA 


8D 


04 


4A 


4A 


D0 


85 


2551: 


24 


6F 


42 


56 


IB 


52 


37 


56 


IE 


2701:E2 


44 


64 


23 


5A 


2F 95 


88 94 


22E9 


:C1 


8A 


29 


0F 


IE 


5E 


A5 


5B 


D8 


2559 


62 


AS 


AC 


63 


04 


32 


50 


04 


80 


2709:21 


IE 


EA 


40 


02 


2B' 43 


63 38 


22F1 


:C9 


B0 


F0 


03 


4C 


74 


0F 


5D 


45 


2 561 


16 


08 


30 


0C 


02 


26 


43 


F2 


68 


27D1:82 


Al 


0E 


9B 


10 


6E 23 


18 DD 


22F9 


:FC 


A0 


5A 


A9 


30 


85 


5B 


E5 


FE 


2569 


00 


24 


83 


0A 


04 


4F 


8C 


40 


3A 


27D9;E6 


C8 


51 


F5 


72 


65 40 


CD CE 


2301 


:58 


A9 


70 


85 


59 


6D 


B5 


A2 


D2 


2571 


D2 


44 


74 


76 


60 


82 


55 


84 


68 


27E1:10 


B3 


C0 


00 


9B 


E4 IF 


2A 16 


2309 


:00 


49 


Al 


30 


C9 


00 


21 


87 


F0 


2579 


52 


50 


C2 


46 


6F 


55 


6B 


70 


05 


27E9: 26 


56 


78 


83 


84 


54 72 


IF Al 


2311 


;10 


C6 


Al 


C2 


01 


D0 


0B 


A2 


75 


2581 


J04 


88 


40 


18 


56 


76 


53 


2E 


E4 


27F1:AA 


88 


24 


B7 


IF 


06 4 8 


45 9E 


2319 


:20 


8E 


9B 


03 


76 


AB 


0F 


C9 


01 


2589 


3C 


C4 


82 


36 


08 


80 


IE 


E4 


6E 


27F9:44 


04 


56 


A9 


A8 


04 48 


84 A A 


2321 


:02 


D0 


25 


B2 


13 


F0 


31 


8D 


B8 


2591 


.04 


35 


48 


56 


56 


04 


29 


7A 


29 


2801:04 


F7 


38 


51 


F2 


65 IF 


25 PD 


2329 


:F6 


IE 


E0 


A4 


Bl 


58 


AA 


A8 


C5 


2599 


:24 


93 


lA 


02 


Al 


S4 


82 


34 


D5 


2809;C3 


ID 


B0 


50 


20 


Dl 8E 


20 2F 


2331 


:AE 


5C 


03 


4F 


62 


63 


F8 


4C 


lA 


25A1 


:73 


29 


24 


63 


26 


20 


D0 


23 


21 


2811:12 


18 


14 


23 


C6 


65 9B 


4D 75 


2339 


:01 


10 


0C 


F9 


5B 


03 


AA 


BD 


IF 


25A9 


:A6 


42 


80 


0E 


42 


78 


D9 


IF 


8F 


2819;05 


D2 


B4 


41 


25 


20 AF 


24 78 


2341 


:16 


10 


91 


5A 


20 


0F 


8C 


93 


58 


25B1 


:A1 


7C 


30 


DF 


30 


02 


55 


48 


79 


2821:6A 


2E 


35 


42 


BC 


A8 44 


70 7E 


2349 


:08 


10 


4C 


A4 


0F 


A9 


58 


81 


BC 


25B9 


41 


82 


42 


42 


00 


C3 


86 


84 


B2 


2829:40 


EC 


08 


86 


78 


41 94 


55 85 


2351 


:18 


59 


60 


E6 


5A 


00 


02 


E6 


7 5 


25C1 


:CC 


51 


45 


98 


17 


48 


00 


51 


30 


2331:06 


05 


A8 


F0 


35 


40 E4 


28 86 


2359 


:5B 


60 


54 


FC 


21 


0E 


20 


gA 


4B 


25C9 


:1C 


02 


0B 


46 


CO 


25 


96 


20 


BC 


2839:84 


23 


AE 


08 


10 


20 90 


70 89 


2361 


;CF 


15 


14 


0D 


16 


17 


08 


09 


4E 


25D1 


:24 


CA 


59 


06 


A0 


29 


47 


23 


03 


2941: 11 


2A 


75 


80 


07 


8A F4 


25 CC 


2369 


:1F 


F8 


42 


01 


02 


03 


28 


29 


6B 


25D9 


:F1 


04 


66 


46 


4 7 


76 


64 


B4 


E0 


2849: 38 


81 


F4 


24 


41 


75 18 


19 20 


2371 


:2A 


2B 


18 


19 


lA 


IB 


34 


F9 


CB 


25E1 


:3F 


43 


B9 


30 


2A 


EA 


80 


81 


56 


2851:13 


85 


lA 


88 


0E 


8A 91 


85 9B 


2379 


:3E 


IC 


ID 


IE 


IF 


24 


25 


26 


65 


25E9 


:46 


62 


94 


67 


2E 


00 


75 


20 


78 


2859:63 


42 


8A 


44 


E0 


11 Dl 


E2 53 


2381 


:27 


21 


22 


0F 


23 


A2 


29 


A9 


78 


25F1 


;0C 


72 


54 


64 


50 


03 


34 


98 


48 


2861:50 


IE 


25 


05 


IF 


54 27 


52 D4 


2389 


:20 


9D 


FF 


03 


A9 


0F 


90 


00 


3C 


25F9 


:42 


65 


82 


03 


88 


78 


87 


84 


F8 


2869:84 


A2 


F4 


30 


3F 


03 21 


65 F3 


2391 


:D8 


30 


06 


6F 


A9 


04 


85 


4F 


BF 


2601 


:2A 


EB 


58 


22 


Dl 


23 


52 


94 


OE 


2871:2C 


12 


40 


B0 


41 


40 55 


40 65 


2399 


:A9 


00 


85 


4E 


A2 


04 


BD 


E9 


04 


2609 


:1F 


IF 


B8 


E8 


02 


E0 


75 


97 


6E 


2879:B8 


20 


7D 


75 


26 


45 4A 


P2 03 


2 3A1 


:10 


A8 


BD 


ED 


10 


20 


27 


0F 


0F 


2611 


:0E 


D8 


16 


45 


52 


76 


51 


F5 


B6 


2881:00 


04 


9B 


ED 


26 


50 74 


05 85 


23A9 


:CA 


D0 


F3 


60 


8D 


Dl 


0C 


9E 


78 


2 619 


:1B 


BA 


81 


07 


82 


2E 


46 


8F 


2B 


2889:BC 


A4 


95 


87 


0A 


8F 8D 


62 98 


23B1 


:0A 


18 


6D 


4F 


03 


A0 


0F 


8C 


EA 


2621 


:24 


E6 


98 


lA 


77 


44 


12 


3E 


ID 


2891:64 


94 


71 


00 


A7 


F0 50 


28 02 


23B9 


:18 


80 


38 


10 


8C 


01 


51 


A0 


OF 


2629 


:66 


0B 


23 


56 


42 


96 


20 


40 


22 


2899:1E 


89 


71 


5F 


22 


BB 13 


11 00 


23C1 


:00 


8C 


00 


D4 


9C 


06 


D4 


A8 


47 


2631 


:32 


02 


54 


E2 


64 


B4 


23 


64 


A4 


28A1;40 


40 


27 


0E 


20 


13 07 


7 5 B8 


23C9 


:B9 


9B 


20 


2F 


01 


90 


02 


9C 


B5 


2639 


:84 


66 


84 


E3 


56 


46 


67 


Dl 


90 


28A9:B2 


05 


19 


42 


35 


4B 05 


29 67 


2 3D1 


:29 


04 


D4 


B9 


9D 


10 


80 


05 


31 


2641 


:84 


97 


42 


36 


29 


88 


38 


63 


A5 


28B1;F1 


18 


01 


05 


CE 


26 26 


52 IF 


2 3D 9 


:D4 


60 


64 


81 


69 


14 


21 


09 


2E 


264 9 


:62 


75 


74 


4D 


B9 


04 


66 


82 


B4 


28B9:35 


09 


ac 


83 


04 


6S AE 


7C 40 


23E1 


:32 


21 


19 


06 


81 


04 


28 


11 


8A 


2651 


:1C 


86 


58 


2A 


F0 


23 


62 


65 


39 


2801:86 


94 


54 


28 


S4 


00 57 


26 2F 


23E9 


,2F 


00 


29 


50 


27 


04 


D0 


CI 


9E 


2659 


;07 


7E 


4 5 


0F 


80 


37 


04 


91 


5E 


28C9:D8 


E8 


72 


35 


07 


37 4F 


95 AB 


23F1 


:1B 


04 


C9 


08 


08 


00 


11 


08 


EA 


2661 


:40 


40 


02 


BA 


2A 


84 


00 


64 


2B 


28D1:0B 


02 


88 


EC 


0D 


46 6C 


20 8E 1 


23F9 


04 


04 


04 


74 


01 


06 


06 


14 


4B 


2669 


;F5 


E4 


C8 


50 


D4 


11 


82 


B4 


AC 


28D9:2A 


40 


E2 


F5 


3C 


Bl 20 


80 74 


2401 


'01 


20 


07 


02 


09 


0C 


07 


02 


5B 


2671 


:04 


CD 


14 


FA 


97 


A3 


Al 


2 3 


17 


2 8E1:A4 


29 


52 


34 


72 


F5 54 


EE 5F 


2409 


04 


01 


C0 


03 


08 


08 


C8 


01 


CE 


2679 


:84 


2C 


82 


00 


03 


Dl 


B2 


Fl 


DA 


28E9:26 


85 


45 


41 


79 


2A 74 


08 D0 


2411 


07 


03 


04 


01 


03 


E0 


20 


63 


6D 


2681 


:01 


F4 


24 


E2 


7B 


82 


F6 


lA 


20 


28F1:C8 


82 


75 


42 


88 


2B 0E 


05 2C 


2419 


0E 


01 


05 


06 


07 


08 


9B 


03 


3C 


2689 


:B9 


20 


05 


27 


57 


6A 


10 


60 


B2 


28F9:88 


75 


Fl 


51 


08 


08 26 


54 40 


2421 


08 


0B 


03 


07 


0B 


22 


09 


08 


7D 


2 691 


:50 


B8 


85 


04 


89 


8 7 


79 


88 


0B 


2901:09 


60 


80 


34 


6A 


84 64 


25 18 


2429 


0F 


0C 


01 


0E 


94 


17 


00 


88 


86 


2699 


:10 


35 


74 


15 


63 


C2 


F7 


18 


49 


2909:54 


IE 


03 


25 


52 


B4 02 


F8 02 


2431 


41 


03 


01 


04 


57 


00 


05 


05 


05 


26A1 


:62 


23 


F8 


52 


35 


48 


2F 


51 


A6 


2911:43 


ID 


03 


84 


08 


15 10 


AC 56 


2439: 


FF 


02 


FF 


04 


07 


06 


03 


00 


69 


26A9 


:F5 


40 


F5 


84 


27 


40 


46 


61 


30 


2919:1B 


E3 


01 


48 


40 


32 3 5 


48 55 1 


2441: 


Fl 


06 


05 


07 


0A 


05 


08 


06 


8F 


26B1 


:65 


IF 


44 


62 


45 


98 


81 


El 


98 


2921:48 


08 


23 


4E 


F0 


B9 10 


18 89 


2449: 


09 


E0 


05 


FF 


08 


34 


FF 


07 


48 


26B9 


.E8 


89 


8 A 


A7 


00 


52 


65 


0D 


09 


2929:26 


40 


4F 


B4 


86 


44 29 


74 DF 


2451: 


40 


10 


0C 


42 


0E 


D0 


30 


3A 


81 


26C1 


:F1 


86 


D0 


26 


92 


75 


B2 


AC 


Al 


2931:80 


85 


54 


74 


D0 


67 F0 


20 29 


2459: 


0C 


54 


64 


06 


00 


09 


0B 


FF 


E3 


26C9 


60 


10 


24 


54 


24 


77 


28 


B0 


14 


2939:40 


87 


04 


45 


52 


07 03 


05 25 


2461: 


0D 


A0 


91 


00 


E4 


61 


IC 


3C 


AB 


2601 


00 


Fl 


50 


50 


67 


SO 


21 


80 


25 


2941:49 


40 


85 


49 


49 


49 F5 


F2 DB 


2469: 


30 


38 


38 


38 


30 


0E 


3E 


05 


9D 


26D9 


08 


80 


99 


00 


00 


72 


E5 


77 


AB 


2949:F5 


2A 


AD 


41 


41 


21 08 


20 A9 


2471: 


46 


7E 


7E 


66 


66 


E7 


EA 


0C 


67 


26E1 


CB 


28 


34 


67 


25 


28 


EB 


44 


01 


2951:02 


40 


62 


A6 


41 


02 08 


40 AF 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE Q-ar 




PROGRAMS 



2959:84 


50 


54 


80 


58 


F5 


€6 


44 


40 


2BC9:45 


E4 


48 


5E 


5E 


54 


24 


86 


FD 


2E39:05 


01 


77 


07 


02 


54 


ID 


42 95 


2961:0A 


2B 


42 


18 


01 


2A 


2B 


50 


A4 


2BDI 


64 


80 


07 


08 


99 


37 


18 


85 


3B 


2E41 


:0F 


B0 


23 


02 


02 


04 


65 


24 E4 


2969:B2 


65 


46 


55 


05 


2E 


72 


F8 


4B 


2B09 


93 


38 


E5 


ES 


IE 


42 


85 


80 


B5 


2E49 


:C8 


61 


F6 


IF 


IE 


IE 


CO 


50 86 


2971:54 


0A 


27 


94 


65 


23 


34 


19 


D7 


2BE1 


54 


4 


85 


54 


55 


26 


E5 


7C 


F3 


2E51 


:B5 


47 


78 


52 


Fl 


01 


IE 


52 B0 


2979:27 


Fl 


3C 


8B 


68 


28 


D2 


52 


F7 


2 BE 9 


52 


74 


62 


ID 


Al 


E4 


40 


84 


4A 


2E59 


:74 


54 


7B 


02 


5A 


5A 


5A 


54 09 


2981:C5 


89 


A3 


F8 


85 


68 


45 


71 


E6 


2BF1 


24 


50 


B6 


A9 


IF 


26 


62 


85 


BB 


2E61 


:45 


25 


65 


61 


EA 


65 


65 


42 66 


2989: 2F 


44 


A0 


43 


10 


08 


B5 


45 


IE 


2BF9 


4 9 


D6 


12 


65 


34 


64 


04 


0A 


88 


2E69 


:95 


0B 


C2 


84 


IP 


44 


50 


DF 9B 


2991:A0 


EE 


45 


46 


26 


BA 


IE 


A5 


FA 


2001 


B7 


24 


B2 


F4 


7 3 


30 


F2 


52 


78 


2E71 


:56 


Al 


E6 


56 


54 


08 


29 


42 FA 1 


2999:69 


C8 


C4 


69 


98 


C3 


23 


E3 


PF 


2C09 


lA 


05 


IF 


2F 


85 


4E 


25 


85 


EF 


2E79 


:65 


04 


24 


57 


94 


40 


46 


06 BB 


29A1:49 


lA 


9A 


05 


85 


05 


28 


56 


A9 


2C11 


IF 


86 


97 


CI 


A6 


B4 


98 


C4 


A7 


2E81 


:28 


65 


60 


64 


D0 


0E 


75 


22 69 


29A9:44 


50 


95 


04 


70 


45 


78 


0A 


BS 


2C19 


38 


74 


C4 


04 


E8 


Al 


IP 


52 


El 


2E89 


:17 


D4 


56 


25 


16 


00 


A9 


65 2D 


1 29B1:41 


F2 


34 


54 


62 


F4 


44 


64 


01 


2C21 


D6 


03 


99 


56 


lA 


EB 


02 


23 


lA 


2E91 


:45 


4A 


4A 


4 A 


9A 


05 


44 


52 18 


29B9:45 


30 


DE 


72 


08 


E6 


AA 


70 


5F 


2C29 


38 


23 


2A 


64 


A4 


08 


87 


70 


B6 


2E99 


:C6 


8E 


El 


05 


52 


C4 


11 


55 A6 


29C1:7S 


46 


2 A 


50 


52 


65 


E0 


FC 


91 


2C31 


45 


23 


45 


66 


F4 


54 


62 


24 


E5 


2EA1 


:26 


89 


12 


07 


18 


75 


29 


51 60 


29C9;56 


C6 


08 


51 


F5 


51 


F2 


46 


30 


2C39 


46 


CI 


A4 


54 


48 


00 


04 


58 


Al 


2EA9 


:F2 


D5 


2F 


15 


0A 


2B 


42 


3A E7 


29D1:27 


8F 


F2 


8S 


64 


40 


C2 


74 


A0 


2C41 


C8 


08 


08 


20 


58 


06 


DA 


82 


4A 


2EB1 


:27 


B4 


0E 


FD 


56 


20 


11 


19 DE 


29D9:08 


09 


BA 


DI 


30 


84 


03 


B4 


35 


2C4 9 


17 


64 


56 


45 


AA 


IF 


55 


82 


64 


2EB9 


'28 


3E 


9E 


23 


54 


64 


E6 


IB DC 


29E1:0F 


18 


29 


71 


BE 


21 


52 


76 


93 


2C51 


FA 


23 


50 


B2 


B2 


EE 


4A 


26 


31 


2EC1 


8C 


44 


60 


50 


81 


4A 


DI 


05 64 


29E9:71 


F5 


IF 


5C 


12 


4E 


40 


84 


EA 


2C59 


0D 


36 


4C 


34 


96 


F0 


6D 


9C 


82 


2EC9 


A4 


IP 


E9 


8C 


46 


8 4 


60 


23 6E 


29F1:F8 


8A 


AB 


25 


50 


E4 


IF 


4 6 


C5 


2C61 


8D 


4A 


23 


46 


26 


AC 


2A 


A5 


B9 


2ED1 


A2 


84 


25 


5A 


F0 


69 


C0 


49 EE 


29F9:56 


65 


62 


84 


38 


7E 


42 


45 


EA 


2C69 


F3 


00 


3F 


35 


42 


49 


27 


64 


E0 


2ED9 


9C 


E4 


82 


CI 


50 


62 


A8 


15 9C 


2A01:4A 


A2 


85 


19 


05 


51 


40 


CE 


22 


2C71 


66 


42 


B5 


44 


55 


08 


44 


81 


69 


2EE1 


40 


C9 


80 


30 


6 3 


B0 


A4 


04 CF 


2A09:6E 


52 


66 


4F 


17 


51 


EC 


04 


C6 


2C79 


F4 


02 


9A 


46 


64 


25 


99 


3D 


AC 


2EE9 


06 


74 


0E 


54 


24 


F4 


B0 


40 04 


2A1I;A3 


2E 


83 


A7 


04 


D2 


4E 


98 


4E 


2C81 


A8 


C3 


63 


24 


48 


60 


EA 


E8 


50 , 


2EF1 


52 


35 


06 


A4 


AB 


9E 


4C 


48 88 


2A19;06 


AA 


25 


AA 


ID 


86 


4F 


C6 


02 


2C89 


85 


91 


07 


42 


46 


42 


36 


40 


02 


2EF9 


84 


09 


2F 


54 


4B 


45 


06 


25 A6 


2A21:24 


54 


E2 


35 


06 


4A 


2A 


5F 


59 I 


2C91 


55 


A2 


35 


44 


2C 


8B 


BS 


4 2 


65 


2F01 


C7 


F3 


4C 


4C 


41 


68 


4B 


07 D7 


2A29:9F 


C8 


00 


06 


47 


74 


52 


64 


P4 


2C99 


95 


46 


62 


44 


66 


81 


0F 


14 


4A 


2F09 


E5 


74 


4B 


E3 


02 


47 


54 


C4 B9 


2A3L:1F 


2A 


41 


F4 


CI 


39 


32 


84 


P2 


2CA1 


01 


80 


F2 


3A 


50 


B4 


EA 


08 


CF 


2F11 


48 


40 


92 


D5 


77 


40 


D5 


IF DA 


2A39:0A 


6E. 


23 


91 


F2 


55 


FC 


54 


E6 


2CA9' 


IC 


28 


64 


58 


55 


85 


58 


F8 


96 


2F19 


07 


68 


72 


15 


50 


21 


89 


93 62 


2A41:47 


27 


B4 


87 


62 


E6 


14 


FC 


E5 


2CB1 


5B 


35 


08 


88 


54 


2 9 


54 


24 


03 


2F21 


70 


92 


95 


23 


72 


54 


IF 


87 EB 


2A49:84 


85 


46 


24 


50 


44 


04 


53 


3B 


2CB9' 


65 


23 


64 


2B 


24 


SF 


45 


0B 


01 


2F29 


40 


24 


A7 


0A 


70 


24 


A4 


AA 4E 


2A5l:95 


27 


54 


2 5 


84 


32 


05 


50 


5E 


2CC1' 


A5 


87 


75 


46 


25 


41 


CC 


94 


3E 


2F31' 


45 


IF 


77 


2E 


56 


65 


IF 


50 A2 


2A59:85 


AA 


83 


11 


86 


50 


A5 


A3 


01 


2CC9: 


IF 


24 


AD 


11 


44 


DF 


08 


71 


A4 


2F39; 


04 


57 


57 


04 


10 


44 


72 


F5 6P 


2A61:6C 


62 


C4 


64 


2C 


52 


33 


87 


06 


2CD1: 


61 


38 


90 


26 


71 


14 


61 


62 


5E 


2F41: 


AA 


0C 


10 


85 


E2 


A2 


98 


50 75 


2A69:AA 


46 


9C 


IF 


88 


44 


ID 


28 


El 


2CD9: 


22 


2E 


C0 


E0 


15 


71 


55 


D3 


El 1 


2F49: 


44 


0A 


33 


8B 


8D 


11 


40 


44 E0 


2A7L;85 


85 


F4 


06 


B6 


47 


0D 


7D 


53 


2CEI: 


54 


04 


54 


41 


El 


64 


52 


38 


81 


2F51' 


A4 


20 


91 


IF 


90 


24 


F9 


94 20 


2A79:65 


56 


85 


52 


£0 


88 


85 


82 


A2 


2CE9: 


88 


59 


E0 


98 


lA 


45 


06 


7 5 


E9 


2F59: 


57 


70 


0A 


B0 


09 


87 


02 


F8 2F 


2A81: 34 


4B 


29 


92 


21 


B4 


56 


55 


EE 


2CF1: 


12 


41 


EA 


A2 


48 


27 


53 


42 


F2 


2P61* 


08 


24 


4A 


62 


3B 


04 


24 


54 02 


2A89:64 


09 


24 


5A 


23 


84 


58 


58 


B0 


2CF9: 


74 


IC 


AS 


5A 


47 


95 


45 


40 


49 


2F69- 


BA 


2B 


28 


01 


0B 


43 


92 


41 00 


2A91:45 


IE 


64 


E6 


FE 


57 


60 


4C 


60 


2001: 


10 


AA 


25 


37 


61 


02 


AC 


34 


C6 


2F71: 


E4 


95 


06 


11 


45 


F7 


C8 


61 76 


2A99:4B 


04 


50 


46 


10 


45 


A8 


84 


6E 


2009: 


54 


06 


F4 


D0 


48 


A4 


BC 


64 


60 


2F79: 


E4 


58 


EC 


11 


60 


04 


48 


4 8 58 


2AAl;08 


80 


88 


40 


F4 


IF 


25 


Fl 


8F 


2D11: 


4A 


25 


85 


97 


45 


47 


24 


AE 


42 


2F81: 


48 


58 


C2 


46 


60 


92 


IE 


3E 9E 


2AA9:89 


45 


52 


F4 


28 


CD 


F7 


10 


26 


2D19: 


34 


IF 


C4 


85 


IF 


56 


55 


0E 


51 


2F89: 


89 


50 


72 


55 


4C 


13 


C4 


16 BS 


2AB1:14 


10 


IF 


52 


96 


D4 


29 


54 


CB 


2D21: 


48 


0B 


E2 


pa 


00 


94 


0E 


28 


E4 


2F91: 


87 


28 


50 


72 


3C 


15 


60 


12 B8 


2AB9:54 


0A 


74 


A8 


28 


46 


A2 


4C 


BF 


2D29: 


51 


F5 


BD 


16 


IF 


2F 


55 


44 


67 


2F99: 


3E 


AD 


5A 


E2 


04 


41 


55 


40 00 


2AC1:26 


74 


68 


9B 


0B 


8C 


62 


44 


A0 


2031: 


62 


84 


DB 


15 


73 


2C 


42 


86 


02 


2FA1: 


44 


34 


88 


02 


44 


5A 


D0 


67 01 


2AC9:92 


93 


39 


97 


E4 


52 


84 


6B 


01 


2039: 


45 


19 


35 


08 


16 


33 


72 


94 


9A 


2FA9: 


64 


A3 


55 


05 


29 


83 


00 


20 56 


2ADI:88 


45 


09 


52 


C8 


IE 


IF 


61 


60 


2041: 


64 


5A 


23 


45 


52 


34 


A 5 


C4 


90 


2FB1: 


A0 


54 


42 


20 


32 


2A 


30 


11 6B 


2AD9:F0 


46 


E8 


78 


90 


42 


8A 


A8 


28 


2049: 


85 


27 


9B 


0D 


90 


83 


39 


55 


CE 


2FB9: 


48 


55 


44 


25 


57 


25 


DB 


0F 82 


2AEL:3E 


11 


B4 


64 


41 


E2 


68 


IE 


PA 


2D51: 


30 


A7 


54 


72 


42 


65 


74 


45 


35 


2FC1: 


C5 


25 


28 


02 


40 


ID 


10 


IF 87 


2AE9:09 


A5 


99 


42 


65 


AA 


46 


0D 


F2 


2059: 


24 


AF 


C3 


A 2 


34 


55 


23 


4A 


DB 


2FC9: 


26 


59 


11 


40 


4D 


04 


90 


14 67 


2AF1:CC 


0E 


94 


08 


2C 


42 


IB 


03 


E6 


2061: 


54 


2P 


57 


60 


88 


02 


30 


90 


51 


2F01: 


87 


78 


D8 


04 


42 


8A 


0B 


31 Bl 


2AF9:2F 


B2 


4B 


9E 


lA 


31 


D0 


82 


9F 


2069: 


46 


42 


C5 


63 


08 


90 


8B 


46 


46 


2FD9: 


B2 


58 


44 


2B 


47 


54 


62 


44 77 


2B01:91 


44 


09 


2C 


6A 


IB 


19 


BD 


C4 


2071: 


2? 


41 


F2 


4C 


0A 


10 


0A 


41 


B8 


2FE1: 


Dl 


39 


C3 


44 


46 


44 


92 


34 D0 


2B99:20 


19 


2A 


45 


47 


IE 


23 


82 


CA 


2D79: 


54 


29 


64 


23 


A5 


4C 


2E 


59 


IB 


2FE9: 


C4 


C2 


34 


94 


IE 


70 


16 


50 5A 


2B11:B9 


2B 


80 


81 


92 


C5 


0B 


54 


4D 


2D81' 


01 


F0 


8A 


45 


2F 


44 


IF 


2E 


9D 


2FP1: 


E0 


0C 


0E 


63 


45 


50 


64 


41 31 


2B19:71 


E2 


38 


08 


BC 


3E 


43 


FB 


C9 


2D89 


B6 


47 


48 


84 


55 


42 


95 


25 


66 


2FF9: 


EA 


A4 


C4 


C4 


AA 


IE 


40 


02 2C 


2B2l:0A 


48 


52 


A4 


98 


13 


25 


DC 


5B 


2D91 


60 


44 


0C 


EF 


C5 


10 


0C 


88 


BC 


3001: 


F9 


52 


84 


06 


9D 


31 


55 


23 63 


2B29:8A 


PB 


A5 


54 


85 


3C 


0E 


70 


67 


2D99 


61 


29 


54 


C4 


30 


01 


08 


CA 


26 


3009: 


41 


F4 


45 


24 


84 


24 


35 


DC 2E 


2B31:80 


43 


13 


DA 


0A 


A2 


48 


54 


68 


2DA1 


66 


41 


64 


10 


11 


94 


94 


74 


85 


3011: 


09 


04 


F0 


42 


IB 


15 


14 


47 DS 


2B39:2F 


6D 


97 


40 


A5 


73 


35 


A5 


84 


2DA9 


04 


40 


45 


17 


72 


13 


92 


Dl 


07 


3019: 


20 


IP 


28 


18 


40 


E2 


64 


64 92 


2B41:48 


08 


58 


IE 


B8 


C5 


61 


A2 


EC 


2DBI 


55 


46 


4C 


47 


47 


47 


C0 


06 


£5 


3021: 


0F 


50 


Dl 


C6 


2D 


40 


E4 


42 3A 


2849:35 


24 


D9 


3D 


40 


54 


61 


5D 


C5 


2DB9 


Dl 


2C 


Al 


13 


55 


4 A 


64 


C4 


CE 


3029: 


4E 


90 


23 


E6 


18 


08 


36 


08 15 


2B51:78 


4A 


50 


A2 


55 


AA 


15 


Bl 


DB 


2DC1 


94 


7B 


32 


C2 


B0 


30 


00 


AA 


A8 


3031: 


54 


05 


C8 


55 


41 


76 


D9 


76 79 


2B59:14 


IC 


04 


CA 


4F 


64 


0A 


27 


35 


20C9 


26 


45 


0E 


52 


34 


64 


IF 


41 


22 


3039: 


40 


42 


84 


20 


BF 


F0 


2A 


40 F3 


2B61:52 


34 


BD 


0F 


71 


80 


D4 


Dl 


9P 


2D01 


F2 


7A 


05 


3 2 


20 


11 


EC 


23 


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AC 


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55 


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ID 


3069- 


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A7 


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80 


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2B91;CC 


30 


88 


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27 


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84 


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2E11 


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19 


21 


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27 


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54 


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28 


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06 


50 


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;75 


65 


50 


52 


45 


05 


55 


09 


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3089 


61 


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43 


41 


F2 


56 


47 


55 4D 


2BB1:64 


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07 


32 


80 


02 


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2E21 


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54 


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01 


05 


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72 


85 


45 


54 


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49 


40 


44 09 


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62 


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51 


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08 


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46 


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65 


44 


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56 


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ID 


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16 


12 


34 


20 


34 


65 


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25 


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61 


5A 


50 


84 


28 


20 


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42 


35 


26 


30A1 


54 


53 


57 


57 


54 


D3 


91 


C5 30 



G*28 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




PROGRAMS 



30A9:8I 66 20 85 22 18 E6 58 58 


3319:D4 A0 50 68 Cl 12 00 60 59 




30B1:8S3 B5 20 39 10 66 45 99 95 


3321:54 C0 62 42 3D 5D 39 D0 F4 




30B9:45 98 18 78 28 62 G2 65 A3 


3329:03 11 75 E0 66 EC C4 Dl 54 


^^^■H MM 


30C1:68 24 63 50 47 24 C0 49 66 


3331:40 D7 D4 56 34 6D IE 54 ID 


■ ■nil w 


30C9:84 07 54 24 59 IE 92 04 67 


3339:58 86 39 lA D6 D2 5A E8 D5 


^#lllkW 


30D1:A3 55 40 98 64 94 94 94 IE 


3341:CC 2A E3 64 21 4C 26 Dl B3 




30D9:24 54 64 Fl 16 92 75 50 43 


3349:55 28 78 40 88 0B E4 CC 7E 


^^^H 


30El:0B 26 C2 A4 A4 A4 25 54 4A 


3351:26 64 77 0B DE 3B 01 20 89 


■ ■l%l 


30E9:42 E5 07 IC 63 46 80 B2 6F 


3359: 0F 79 20 22 IE DD 2A 08 90 


^^mM 


30F1:64 93 21 23 A9 66 48 51 88 


3361:E8 42 75 44 5C CI 89 94 51 




30F9:F2 3C 2F 52 65 3E CE 21 D0 


3369:52 4D ED IE 45 27 4C ID 68 


■^■^^■^ 


3101:1E AA 09 4E 23 85 IF 92 23 


3371:DE 4E 44 45 63 23 DE DD FA 


Vfll^K 


3109;F5 26 54 00 F8 54 Fl 74 EB 


3379:9D 52 52 76 95 08 3F 45 85 


■#lvHm 


3111:08 40 D5 20 F7 2F 72 47 EC 


3381:45 DD 27 45 24 83 96 C0 58 




3119:40 F2 50 93 31 94 52 66 05 


3389:74 94 0D 45 14 10 E0 12 lA 




3121:2F 55 52 36 40 A0 A6 96 86 
3129:96 91 F5 23 45 25 47 2E A7 


3391:6E 45 28 89 0B 10 E6 61 E5 
3399:40 15 4E 39 06 41 £1 64 20 


In addition to the type-in pro- 


3131:49 23 46 EF 18 20 01 21 2D 


33A1:91 45 23 Dl ED Dl 9B E2 74 


grams found in each issue of the 


3139:50 55 D5 4A A5 05 88 69 3A 
3141:78 48 47 69 69 4A 5E 54 F6 


33A9:56 E4 45 4D 4D 23 00 BC A5 
33B1:A2 10 28 IC 52 84 54 3A B8 


magazine, Gazette Disk offers 


3149:91 AA 26 71 78 46 64 56 F6 


33B9:96 3S 2A EE E4 59 EE 90 69 


bonus programs and original 64 


3151:69 64 4A 0E 23 52 F4 44 3C 
3159: IE IE 42 36 C2 03 07 56 84 


33C1:2P 36 E2 36 44 54 IE 41 FD 
33C9:A8 12 A0 22 63 Al El E4 89 


and 128 artwork. Here are this 


3161:94 A4 48 24 58 47 29 89 3E 


33D1:54 08 IS 66 IE 80 ID 48 85 


month's bonuses. 


3169:0B 41 EI E4 64 61 43 75 D0 


33D9:C4 55 C4 E8 06 D4 55 D4 22 




3171:56 4A 29 41 F2 84 24 62 IF 


33E1:D4 C4 45 2A 80 08 41 41 23 




3179:44 23 C9 13 E6 C8 2B 64 46 
3181:23 57 40 66 78 06 47 2B 4F 


33E9:21 75 IF C2 85 2A 40 D2 76 
33F1:94 0C 28 40 E2 94 0F E0 17 


Head On 




3189:40 44 66 46 6A 66 24 30 B3 


33F9:9C B7 0E 53 44 61 28 5C E7 


Grant R. Young 


3191:EE 00 89 4A 22 54 66 42 B2 


3401:45 64 85 26 39 IC Fl C0 ID 


Chrlstchurch, New Zealand 


3199:86 42 85 4A 2E 2F 5C 4A 56 


3409:BB 43 A2 30 00 89 0E 95 4F 




31A1:A4 24 64 66 47 48 90 84 3F 
31A9:A4 BB 76 A4 23 B6 CB 52 44 


3411:88 2D 3F 09 85 91 29 68 AE 
3419:24 DA 88 28 4C 22 A5 C7 D8 


The object of this outstanding 


31B1:D4 21 0A 44 59 B8 91 A0 BD 


3421:03 24 95 44 A2 2A 91 BA A6 


two-player arcade game is sim- 


31B9:62 06 45 CC IF 23 50 52 BC 
31C1:35 67 IF 25 52 3C IF C5 56 
31C9:89 4A 97 E8 BB 4A 90 23 68 


3429:10 03 90 C8 B5 88 29 A8 C3 
3431:82 A5 86 2C 58 82 7A 88 22 
3439:2B A8 ID D5 29 82 C5 32 73 


ple: Try to find your opponent 
and annihilate him. Two players 


31D1:8A 30 64 ES 08 0A 40 A4 FD 


3441:1D 2E F5 25 82 E5 3C ID 16 


are placed in a maze that's filled 


31D9:0A IF B4 D4 42 3B 44 A4 19 


3449:58 2E B6 IC C5 2B 82 85 97 


31E1:54 04 61 01 42 55 45 26 C3 


3451:32 ID 54 04 F5 24 54 54 22 


with bullets, missiles, guns, and 


31E9:0A 50 A5 52 34 BB 23 48 61 
31F1:D0 F0 18 20 C8 80 28 3A D0 


3459:45 41 19 45 45 44 52 32 3E 
3461:1F 64 54 42 F5 2F 52 85 87 


teleporters. Check out the excel- 


31F9:72 55 44 6C 02 22 88 25 6F 


3469:0A 3E 64 0D 40 02 85 F4 CD 


lent split-screen technique, and 


3201:00 48 45 45 06 BA 06 23 BE 
3209:72 45 44 29 B4 84 49 44 62 


3471: 2F 42 84 00 80 00 00 00 96 


design your own mazes with the 


3211:E2 10 45 52 57 23 54 4B F3 


editor program that's included. 


3219:26 4B B4 BB 41 F4 55 42 80 






3221:FB IC 35 A2 54 IF 27 4B 2C 
3229:41 E2 6B 74 51 F5 IF 05 41 
3231:45 5A 54 23 5A A4 26 50 8D 








ON DISPLAY 


3239:72 35 44 82 34 IF lA 07 B3 


Gazette is looking for utilities, 


IN 
^'GAZETTE GALLERY" 


3241:9F 34 52 84 54 42 5B El 59 
3249:EF 45 24 82 45 04 24 52 78 


games, applications, educa- 


3251:48 IF 57 AA IE IE AA 75 6B 


tional programs, and tutorial ar- 




3259:0C 01 83 CF CE F0 2F 42 4C 
3261:A4 53 88 F9 67 89 40 72 Fl 


ticles. If you've created a 


Picture of the Month: 


3269:37 12 0A 2D 50 92 64 A0 38 
3271:85 42 F9 25 F8 2E 20 AC 28 


program that you think other 


CROC 


3279:70 00 05 20 C8 24 69 44 A6 


readers might enjoy or find 


Vincent D. Zahnle 


3281:99 24 88 39 CC 80 A0 4B 55 
3289:B2 44 BB 24 42 48 E0 0P 22 


useful, send it on disk to 


Martinez, GA 


3291:21 IE 07 75 44 14 24 2F 30 






3299:82 F8 96 40 C5 40 IE 26 BE 


Gazette Submissions Reviewer 


NOMAD 


32A1:8D C2 02 4D 5D 14 23 IE 32 
32A9:03 45 42 CB 42 39 44 66 CB 


COMPUTE Publications 


Brian Kissinger 


32BI:94 0D IF 24 54 2C B4 40 C6 
32B9:84 69 2E 41 24 B2 E4 DA 25 


324W.WendoverAve. 


EvansvHIe. IN 


32C1:46 42 04 C0 Al 38 23 62 FC 


Ste. 200 


WINTER PINES 


32C9;D9 25 40 03 99 44 3A 24 13 
32D1:62 F9 23 94 49 92 F6 66 7C 


Greensboro, NC 27408 


Robert Wbodall 


1 32D9;20 3E 49 44 2F 92 F9 28 2B 




Rural Hall NC 


32E1:92 00 IG 12 74 IC 42 2B F7 


Please enclose an SASE if you 


■ lliJI Ul ■ ICIJJ, l^^f 


32E9:87 60 83 CC FC CF C0 9E AE 
32F1:24 CI 68 7C 16 80 42 33 18 


wish to have the materials 


MOUNTAIN 


32F9:42 52 A4 AA 01 D0 3D IE 37 
3301:23 CI C4 5D D2 4C 15 45 0F 


returned. 


Danny English 


3309:C7 03 4E 24 14 8C E2 A8 61 




Moreno Valley, CA 


3311:01 76 98 D8 00 C9 D8 IE 2D 









MAY 1 9 <? 1 



COMPUTE 0-29 



D 




ROGRAMS 



JESUS MENDOZA ESCALONA 



If you need a useful utility program 
for reading, renaming, and scratch- 
ing files, try Multi-Reader, It can 
handle one or more files at a time 
for extra speed and convenience, and 
it provides other useful file infor- 
mation as well. 

This disk-management program 
displays the parameters of any file or 
program on disk. It provides a file's 
size in blocks, its type (program, se- 
quential, or user), its starting and end- 
ing addresses, and whether or not the 
file is locked. 

Typing It In 

Multi-Reader is written entirely in 
machine language, but it loads and 
runs like a BASIC file. To enter it, use 
MLX, our machine language entry 
program; see ^'Typing Aids" elsewhere 
in this section. When MLA" prompts 
you, respond with the values given 
below. 

Starting address: 0801 
Ending address: 1720 

Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before you exit MLX, 

Remove any cartridges you may 
have plugged into your computer. 
They may interfere with Multi-Reader 
and cause ii not to work. 

When the main screen appears, 
you'll see a menu with all the program 
options. The first letter in certain 
words will be flashing. These are hot 
keys that will activate the Multi-Read- 
er comrmnds. The A, B, and Home 
keys are also active, although they do 
not appear on the menu screen. Their 
functions are covered later. 

Using the Program 

To use Multi-Reader, insert a disk in 
your drive and call up a directory. Use 
the appropriate hot keys to make your 
selections. 

D Press D after you've inserted a 
disk, and its directory will appear 
onscreen. Multi-Reader vnW display 
all the files, even those that have 
been deleted (* del) and would not 



normally appear on a directory* list- 
ing. The current track and sector are 
displayed on the bottom left of the 
screen for your convenience. 
This option allows you to scratch 
or delete selected files. Select a file 
by pressing the space bar. This will 
highlight its name in the director}'. 
You can delete as many files as you 
like at one lime by simply highlight- 




READ, RENAME, OR 

SCRATCH FILES EASILY 

WITH THIS UTILITY 

FOR THE 64 



ing each name. Before any files are 
deleted, you'll be asked if you are 
sure. Press Y to continue or N to 
cancel. .After a file has been deleted, 
its file type changes to * del. If a 
read or write error occurs, it's dis- 
played at the bottom of the screen, 
and the program stops until you 
press the space bar to continue. 

R Press this key when you want to re- 
name all the files selected. To re- 
name a file, enter the new name on 
the bottom line of the screen and 
press Return. Use the Inst/Del key 
to correct typing errors. Press the 
Run/Stop key to exit. Any errors 
are handled as explained above. 

G Press G to get or read al! selected 
files. The contents will be displayed 
in ASCII characters. The current 
track and sector are displayed at the 
bottom of the screen. Press the 



space bar to pause the information; 
press it again to continue. Press the 
Run/Stop key to stop and return to 
the main screen. When youVe 
reached the end of the file, the pro- 
gram stops and waits for you to 
press the space bar so that you can 
continue reading the next selected 
file. 

I This key provides file parameters: 
name, type, lock key, size in bytes, 
size in blocks, starting address, and 
ending address. The track and sec- 
tor where the program is saved are 
displayed at the bottom left of the 
screen. To stop and return to the 
main screen, press the Run/Slop 
key. 

Run/Stop To stop an operation dur- 
ing its execution, press this key. 
Press it at the menu screen to exit to 
BASIC. You'll be prompted to press 
Y to exit or N to cancel. 

Cursor keys Use these keys to scroll 
up and down the filenames in the 
main screen. 

Space bar Use the space bar to select 
a filename. Press it again if you 
should change your mind about a 
selected file. In the Get or Read 
mode, it's used as a toggle key to 
pause or resume the scrolling text. 

B Press this key to scroll to the last 
file in the list. 

Home Press this key to move to the 
first filename in the directors'. 

A This option toggles all the file- 
names between highlighted and not 
highlighted. 



MULTI-READER 












08(51: 


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08 


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0829 


20 


28 


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20 


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0831 


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86 


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10 


F8 


20 


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FF 


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06 


0859 


.EC 


20 


CB 


11 


80 


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8A 


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AA 


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06 


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CE 



G-30 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




D 



ROGRAMS 



0839 


.86 


09 


E8 


86 


0A 


A 9 


00 


85 


21 


0AF9:A0 


05 


20 


BD 


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B0 


26 


A2 


A9 


0D69 


18 


A5 


FB 


69 


20 


85 


FB 


90 AE 


0891 


02 


A9 


00 


8 5 


43 


8D 


18 


0F 


F4 


0B01 


:00 


A0 


05 


BD 


IB 


17 


C9 


A0 


25 


0D71 


:02 


E6 


FC 


E6 


0A 


63 


85 


02 53 


0899 


*A9 


8C 


85 


44 


8D 


19 


0F 


A2 


28 


0B09 


:F0 


06 


91 


FD 


C8 


E3 


00 


F3 


AA 


0D79 


:60 


20 


72 


11 


40 


57 


0D 


AS AA 


08A1 


15 


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98 


91 


43 


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60 


20 


D2 


FF 


Bl 17 


0AE1 


C9 


FF 


A 9 


52 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


2B 


0D51 


04 


A4 


40 


20 


IE 


AB 


IS 


A5 


16 


0FC1 


FD 


09 


A0 


F0 


05 


08 


G0 


16 57 


0AE9 


3A 


A0 


00 


20 


D2 


FF 


B9 


IB 


6A 


0D59: 


FD 


69 


20 


85 


FD 


90 


02 


E6 


46 


0FC9 


DO 


F2 


A9 


0D 


20 


D2 


FF 


20 7F 


OAFl 


17 


ca 


C9 


A0 


00 


F5 


A9 


3D 


F5 


0D61: 


FE 


AD 


7A 


04 


C9 


20 


FO 


OB 


Bl 


0FD1 


00 


FF 


A9 


0F 


20 


03 


FF 


20 AC 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE G-31 




PROGRAMS 



0FD9:21 


0F 


AD 


C2 


07 


C9 


30 


00 


BE 


1249:9B 


C2 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


03 


1489:20 


20 


20 


20 C2 


20 


20 20 F6 


0FEL:09 


AD 


C3 


07 


C9 


30 


D0 


02 


8B 


1251:20 


20 


20 


20 


C2 


AB 


C3 


C3 


A3 


14C1; 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 C2 8C 


0FE9:18 


60 


38 


60 


A 9 


FD 


85 


45 


CE 


1259:C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


70 


14C9: 


C2 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 43 


0FF1:20 


CC 


FF 


A4 


43 


A6 


44 


IB 


F2 


1261:C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


85 


1401: 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 F9 


0FF9:20 


F0 


FF 


A0 


02 


84 


46 


A5 


C2 


1269:C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


C3 


80 


1409: 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 02 


1001:49 


10 


0F 


A9 


26 


85 


49 


20 


40 


1271:C3 


83 


20 


12 


97 


44 


92 


9B 


13 


14E1: 


20 


20 


20 


20 C2 


20 


12 97 7A 


1009:Eft 


E8 


18 


A2 


17 


A0 


00 


20 


61 


1279:49 


52 


45 


43 


54 


4F 


52 


59 


91 


14E9: 


4 3 


52 


53 


52 20 


55 


2F 44 00 


1011;F0 


FF 


A5 


45 


C9 


FF 


F0 


3F 


22 


1281:C2 


C2 


20 


20 


41 


20 


30 


20 


E2 


14F1: 


92 


20 


9B 


02 C2 


20 


20 20 02 


1019:A5 


49 


30 


E7 


A4 


46 


Bl 


41 


C5 


1289:54 


4F 


47 


47 


4C 


45 


20 


41 


02 


14F9: 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 22 


1021:Ce 


45 


C6 


49 


E6 


46 


C9 


0D 


54 


1291:4C 


4C 


20 


46 


49 


4C 


45 


4E 


AB 


1501: 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 28 


1029:F0 


D9 


29 


7F 


C9 


20 


80 


02 


87 


1299:41 


4D 


45 


53 


20 


C2 


20 


20 


FB 


1509: 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 33 


1031:A9 


2E 


20 


D2 


FF 


20 


F2 


11 


5A 


12A1:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


C5 


1511: 


C2 


20 


20 


40 4F 


56 


45 20 F8 


1039:20 


B4 


11 


90 


D5 


20 


BE 


0E 


7C 


12A9:C2 


C2 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


C7 


1519: 


20 


20 


20 


C2 02 


20 


20 20 82 


1041:20 


BA 


10 


20 


28 


11 


20 


49 


33 


1281:49 


4E 


20 


54 


48 


45 


20 


4C 


3B 


1521: 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 4B 


1049:11 


A9 


00 


8D 


E0 


BC 


85 


04 


4E 


12B9:49 


53 


54 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


C5 


1529: 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 53 


1051:35 


C6 


20 


14 


0E 


38 


60 


A5 


E2 


12C1:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


C2 


20 


12 


62 


1531* 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 58 


1059:D3 


85 


43 


A5 


D6 


85 


44 


A2 


7F 


12C9:97 


53 


92 


98 


43 


52 


41 


54 


04 


1539: 


C2 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 B4 


1061:05 


20 


C6 


FF 


18 


60 


A2 


04 


70 


12D1:43 


48 


98 


20 


20 


C2 


C2 


20 


00 


1541 


20 


20 


20 


C2 02 


20 


20 20 AA 


1069:A0 


00 


B9 


00 


04 


99 


00 


A0 


38 


1209:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


FD 


1549 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 73 


1071:B9 


00 


05 


99 


00 


Al 


B9 


00 


A2 


12E1:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


06 


1551' 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 7B 


1079:06 


99 


00 


A2 


89 


00 


07 


99 


A2 


12E9:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


0E 


1559 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 83 


1081:00 


A3 


B9 


00 


D8 


99 


00 


A4 


93 


12F1:20 


20 


C2 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


6A 


1561 


C2 


20 


12 


97 20 


53 


50 41 E0 


1089:89 


00 


D9 


99 


00 


A5 


89 


00 


65 


12F9:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


C2 


C2 


20 


ED 


1569 


43 


45 


20 


20 92 


20 


98 02 98 


1091:DA 


99 


00 


A6 


89 


00 


DB 


99 


0F 


1301:20 


42 


20 


30 


20 


47 


4F 


20 


7C 


1571 


C2 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 EC 


1099:00 


A7 


C3 


D0 


CD 


CA 


10 


CA 


4E 


1309:54 


4F 


20 


54 


48 


45 


20 


4C 


5A 


1579 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 A3 


I0A1:A0 


IE 


B9 


DA 


00 


99 


00 


A9 


8E 


1311:41 


53 


54 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


IB 


1581 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 AB 


I0A9:86 


10 


F7 


A9 


37 


85 


01 


A9 


27 


1319:20 


20 


C2 


20 


12 


97 


52 


92 


07 


1539 


20 


20 


20 


20 02 


20 


20 53 FB 


10B1:93 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


35 


85 


01 


2C 


1321:98 


45 


4E 


41 


40 


45 


98 


20 


IB 


1591 


4 5 


4C 


45 


43 54 


20 


20 C2 74 


10B9:60 


A9 


36 


85 


01 


A2 


04 


A0 


CE 


1329:20 


20 


C2 


C2 


20 


20 


20 


20 


CD 


1599 


C2 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 15 


10C1:00 


B9 


00 


A0 


99 


00 


04 


89 


E8 


1331:20 


20 


46 


49 


4C 


45 


4E 


41 


22 


15A1 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 CB 


10C9:00 


Al 


99 


00 


05 


89 


00 


A2 


37 


1339:4D 


4 5 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


3F 


15A9 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 20 D3 


10D1:99 


00 


06 


B9 


00 


A3 


99 


00 


OC 


1341:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


C2 


0A 


1581 


20 


20 


20 


20 C2 


20 


20 20 F0 


10D9:07 


B9 


00 


A4 


99 


00 


D8 


89 


6E 


1349:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


6F 


15B9 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 02 36 


10E1:00 


A5 


99 


00 


D9 


B9 


00 


A 6 


FA 


1351:20 


20 


C2 


C2 


20 


20 


20 


20 


F5 


15C1 


CA 


C3 


C3 


C3 03 


C3 


03 03 6F 


10E9:99 


00 


DA 


89 


00 


A7 


99 


00 


9F 


1359:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


7F 


15C9 


C3 


C3 


C3 


03 03 


C3 


03 03 F3 


10F1:DB 


C8 


D0 


CD 


CA 


10 


CA 


A0 


F5 


1361:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


37 


1501 


.C3 


C3 


03 


03 03 


03 


03 03 FB 


10F9:1E 


89 


00 


A9 


99 


DA 


00 


88 


F2 


1369:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


C2 


32 


1509 


C3 


C3 


03 


03 Bl 


03 


03 03 73 


1101:10 


F7 


C6 


01 


60 


A 9 


00 


80 


49 


1371:20 


12 


97 


47 


92 


98 


45 


54 


75 


15E1 


C3 


C3 


C3 


03 03 


03 


03 CB 14 


1109:20 


D0 


8D 


21 


D0 


A9 


FD 


A0 


FC 


1379:28 


52 


45 


41 


44 


29 


9B 


C2 


C5 


15E9 


20 


20 


42 


59 3A 


4A 


45 53 E2 


1111:11 


85 


41 


84 


42 


A0 


00 


Bl 


03 


1381:C2 


20 


20 


43 


4F 


4D 


45 


20 


F3 


15F1 


:55 


53 


20 


40 45 


4E 


44 4F AF 


1119:41 


F0 


08 


20 


02 


FF 


C8 


00 


74 


1389:30 


20 


47 


4F 


20 


54 


4F 


20 


45 


15F9 


5A 


41 


20 


4 5 53 


43 


41 40 70 


1121:F6 


E6 


42 


4C 


18 


11 


60 


A9 


F4 


1391:54 


48 


45 


20 


46 


49 


52 


53 


ED 


1601 


4F 


4E 


41 


13 00 


75 


03 CC 74 


1129:37 


85 


01 


A0 


00 


A2 


IF 


A9 


E4 


1399:54 


20 


20 


20 


C2 


20 


20 


20 


EE 


1609 


:09 


46 


0A 


20 0B 


A8 


08 EA 57 


1131:00 


85 


45 


A9 


E0 


85 


46 


Bl 


53 


13A1:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


C2 


6A 


1611 


:0C 


80 


00 


14 0E 


3E 


0E 4A 16 


1139:45 


91 


45 


C8 


D0 


F9 


E6 


46 


lA 


13A9:C2 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


21 


1619 


:0E 


5E 


0E 


44 53 


52 


47 49 A5 


1141;CA 


10 


F4 


A9 


35 


85 


01 


60 


28 


1381:20 


20 


46 


49 


4C 


45 


4E 


41 


A2 


1621 


:91 


11 


20 


13 41 


42 


23 55 3E 


1149:A9 


37 


85 


01 


A2 


18 


BD 


F0 


B0 


13B9:4D 


45 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


8F 


1629 


:31 


3 A 


35 


20 30 


20 


30 33 BA 


1151:EC 


18 


69 


01 


9D 


F0 


EC 


CA 


82 


13C1:20 


20 


20 


20 


C2 


20 


12 


97 


58 


1631 


:20 


31 


34 


0D 92 


20 


44 45 F3 


1159:10 


F4 


A9 


02 


8D 


F7 


E8 


A9 


OD 


13C9:49 


92 


98 


4E 


46 


4F 


20 


46 


87 


1639 


:4C 


20 


00 


92 20 


53 


45 51 E6 


1161:16 


8D 


04 


E9 


A9 


lA 


8D 


D3 


B5 


13D1:49 


4C 


45 


C2 


AD 


20 


20 


20 


02 


1641 


:20 


00 


92 


20 50 


52 


47 20 40 


1169:E9 


8D 


00 


EA 


A9 


35 


85 


01 


C0 


1309:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


FF 


164 9 


:00 


92 


20 


55 53 


52 


20 00 97 


1171:60 


A9 


0F 


20 


85 


0E 


20 


EA 


23 


13E1:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


08 


1651 


:92 


20 


52 


45 4C 


20 


00 92 E 2 


1179:E8 


60 


A9 


20 


A2 


27 


9D 


C0 


0D 


13E9:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


10 


1659 


:20 


3F 


3F 


3F 20 


00 


41 52 17 


1181:07 


CA 


10 


FA 


60 


48 


18 


65 


45 


13F1:80 


20 


20 


2 


20 


20 


20 


20 


E6 


1661 


:45 


20 


59 


4F 55 


20 


53 5 5 7F 


1189:45 


85 


45 


90 


02 


E6 


46 


68 


02 


13F9:20 


20 


20 


C2 


AB 


20 


20 


20 


A6 


1669 


:52 


45 


20 


23 59 


2F 


4E 29 E3 


1191:18 


65 


49 


85 


49 


90 


02 


E6 


12 


1401:49 


4E 


53 


45 


52 


54 


20 


41 


85 


1671 


:3F 


00 


44 


45 40 


45 


54 49 83 


1199:4A 


60 


20 


EA 


E8 


20 


BE 


0E 


FE 


1409:20 


44 


49 


53 


48 


20 


49 


4E 


6C 


1679 


:4E 


47 


2E 


2E 2E 


00 


4E 45 9A 


llAl:ia 


A2 


U 


A0 


0C 


20 


F0 


FF 


28 


1411:20 


44 


52 


49 


56 


45 


20 


20 


61 


1631 


:57 


20 


4E 


41 40 


45 


3A 00 33 


11A9:A9 


0B 


A0 


17 


20 


IE 


AB 


20 


D9 


I419:B3 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


0B 


1639 


:93 


00 


00 


0D 20 


20 


50 52 A9 


I1B1:C2 


11 


60 


20 


El 


FF 


D0 


02 


3A 


1421:20 


20 


20 


C2 


B0 


20 


20 


20 


F7 


1691 


:4F 


47 


52 


41 40 


20 


4E 41 5E 


11B9:38 


60 


20 


E4 


FF 


C9 


20 


00 


9A 


1429:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


51 


1699 


:40 


45 


3A 


00 00 


20 


20 20 IF 


11CI:07 


20 


E4 


FF 


C9 


20 


00 


F9 


76 


1431:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


59 


16A1 


:20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 54 02 


I1C9:18 


60 


20 


7B 


11 


18 


A2 


13 


12 


1439:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


61 


16A9 


:59 


50 


45 


3A 0D 


0D 


20 20 DF 


11D1:A0 


01 


20 


F0 


FF 


A9 


5F 


A0 


90 


1441:AE 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


80 


168X 


:20 


20 


20 


20 40 


4F 


43 48 60 


11D9: 16 


20 


IE 


AB 


20 


E4 


FF 


F0 


13 


1449:20 


20 


20 


C2 


C2 


20 


20 


20 


80 


16B9 


:20 


48 


45 


59 3A 


0D 


0D 53 7 A 


11E1;FB 


C9 


4E 


F0 


07 


C9 


59 


00 


30 


1451:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


79 


16C1 


:49 


5A 


45 


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4E 


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11E9:F3 


18 


90 


01 


38 


20 


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78 


1459:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


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81 


16C9 


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3A 


00 00 B7 


11P1:60 


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1461:20 


20 


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89 


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53 


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54 


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1439:42 


41 


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52 


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53 


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1231:20 


2 


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20 


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20 


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20 


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52 


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1719 


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00 


00 


00 00 


00 


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1241:20 


20 


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92 


07 


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55 


52 


52 


53 


2E 


20 


20 


F3 












ED 



G-32 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




D 



ROGRAMS 



ROBERT TRAVAJNI 



This is a fast-paced dogfight pro- 
gram for two players flying radon- 
ium-powered spaceships. Each 
player tries to destroy the other 
ship and its cache of fuel containers 
while avoiding enemy fire. 

The ship in the upper left corner 
of the screen is controlled by a joy- 
stick in port 2; the other, by a stick in 
port 1 . So after you've typed the game 
in, invite your best friend over for a 
friendly space duel, 

Radonium consists of two pro- 
grams. The first is a short BASIC boot 
program that loads and runs the main 
machine language program. The boot 
program is only a few lines long, but 
to avoid typing errors, you may want 
to use The Automatic Proofreader to 
enter it; see "Typing Aids" elsewhere 
in this section. 

YouUl need MLX, our machine 
language entry program, to enter the 
main program; see 'Typing Aids*' 
elsewhere in this section. When MLX 
prompts you, respond with the values 
given below. 

Starting address: COOO 
Ending address: CFFF 

Be sure to save a copy of the program 
as RADONIUM/ML. before exiting 
MLX, This is the name the boot 
program loads and runs. 

Playing the Game 

When the title screen appears, set 
your game parameters. The levels of 
play are selected by the function keys. 
Level 3 is the most difficult. The plus 
and minus keys select the number of 
rounds you wish to play. You can set 
it anwhere between 10 and 90; the 
default number of rounds is 20. A 
round continues until a ship has been 
destroyed. 

The main screen also provides 
scoring information, presenting both 
scores from the previous game and 
the game's high score. The high score 
will be in the color of the ship that 
scored it. 

When you press a function key, 
the game begins. The object is to de- 



stroy your opponent's ship and radon- 
ium supplies before he or she can 
destroy yours. 

Learning to maneuver your craft 
may lake some practice. Press the joy- 
stick to the left to rotate to the left; 
move it to the right to rotate right. 
Press the joystick forward to acceler- 
ate in the direction your ship is facing; 
pull it back to stop. Press the fire but- 
ton to fire a neutron pulse. 




I 



SPACESHIPS DUEL IN 

THIS TWO-PLAYER, 

ARCADE-STYLE 

GAME FOR THE 64, 

JOYSTICKS REQUIRED. 



Do not touch your opponent's ra- 
donium supply depot until you've de- 
stroyed all the canisters stored there. 
Fifty points are awarded for every ra- 
donium canister you destroy, but the 
points go only to the winner of each 
round. The round ends whenever 
your ship or your opponent's ship has 
been destroyed. Your ship is very 
strong, however; it can bounce off 
walls and your own fuel area without 
harm. 

Information windows in the cen- 
ter of the screen keep track of the 
scores for the current round, the over- 
all totals, and the number of the cur- 
rent round. Pressing the up-arrow key 
during a round will terminate that 
game and return you to the title 
screen. .Any points accrued in the ter- 
minated round will not be added to 
the total scores. 

Since each player has 24 canisters 
of radonium in his or her supply de- 
pot, you can build up your score by 
destroying as many of them as you 



can. Remember, each one is worth 50 
points. Getting to the canisters that 
are stored against the walls can be 
tricky, however, due to the shape of 
your vessel and the fact that your guns 
are located in the ship's nose. You'll 
have to attack from several angles. 

RADONIUM (PROGRAM 1) 

KH REM COPYRIGHT 1991 COMPUT 
E PUBLICATIONS INTL LTD - 

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
SR 10 IFFL=0THENFL=1:LOAD"RADO 

NIUM/ML.",8,1 
SQ 20 SYS49X52 



RADONIUM/ML 



C000 
C008 
C0L0 
C018 
C020 
C028 
C030 
C038 
C040 
C048 
C050 
C058 
C060 
C069 
C070 
C078 
C080 
C088 
C090 
C098 
C0A0 
C0A8 
C0B0 
C0B8 
C0C0 
C0C8 
C0D0 
C0D8 
C0E0 
C0E8 
C0F0 
C0F8 
C100 
C108 
C110 
C118 
C120 
C128 
C130 
C138 
C140 
C148 
C150 
C158 
C160 
C168 



8D 
00 



A9 0B 

FC A0 
91 FB 
D0 F6 
0A 08 
89 66 
CC 99 
09 09 
89 C2 
CD 99 
20 B9 
76 CF 
99 9E 
0F A9 
03 88 
CE 9D 
18 80 
00 99 
AE CE 
A9 19 
A9 20 
85 FD 
B9 0D 
D0 F6 
FD 90 
E6 FC 
FB 90 
CB A 9 
FC A9 
0E 85 
91 FB 
C6 02 
40 85 
FC C6 
F6 02 A9 



11 00 
93 84 



C8 D0 FB 
A0 2D B9 
B9 CC CC 
CD 99 89 
CA 08 B9 
89 94 CD 
CD 99 88 
C9 09 88 
,55 CF 99 
99 5E 0F 
0F B9 B8 
FF 99 80 
10 DD A2 
4D 0C CA 
0C 8C 
02 99 



00 D4 
02 A9 



32 8D 
00 8D 
F8 8D 
02 18 
AC 02 
0F 99 
10 E4 
4F 05 
10 F2 
02 D0 
F0 15 



IF 

A7 

99 

85 

85 FC A2 

A5 FC 85 

CF 91 FD 

A5 FD 18 

02 E6 FE 

A5 FB 18 

02 E6 FC 

68 85 FB 

09 85 FE 
02 A2 00 
C8 E8 E0 
D0 EF 18 
FB 90 02 
FE D0 D8 

14 8D 
F4 CE 20 
21 D0 8D 

10 D0 A0 

69 80 99 
69 B0 99 
94 09 99 
A0 02 B9 
A9 0F 99 
C8 B9 A7 
07 C8 C0 
B9 A7 02 



A9 08 
FB A2 
E6 FC 
9E CC 
99 4A 

08 B9 
28 CD 
99 4 9 

09 89 

10 CD 
IE 0F 
89 97 
CF 99 

03 99 

21 BD 
10 F7 

22 0C 
E7 02 
88 10 
00 85 
28 A5 
FE A0 
C8 C0 
69 08 
CA D0 
69 40 
C6 02 
A9 2A 
A0 00 
BD 56 
08 D0 
A 5 FB 
E6 FC 
A9 0F 
13 03 
44 E5 
20 D0 

04 B9 
94 05 
AF 05 
AF D9 
E7 CP 
4F D9 
02 D9 

05 D0 
38 F9 



35 9E 
38 4B 
CA BF 
99 22 

08 16 
FA 4E 
99 FB 

09 71 
F3 72 
A0 Al 
B9 15 
CF 80 
DE EA 
A0 59 
71 FB 
A0 5A 
A9 84 
B9 AF 
EF 29 
FB 5A 
F8 7C 
00 5A 
08 02 
85 F0 
E6 8F 
85 DD 
D0 FA 
85 70 
A9 E8 
CD AE 
F5 A0 
69 30 
E6 lA 
8D CI 
A 9 6E 
A9 28 
A9 70 
A7 CA 
B9 D5 
A9 0A 
88 A9 
99 E7 
88 29 
AC FA 
F3 36 
AC EC 



MAY ] 9 9 1 



COMPUTE G-3a 




PROGRAMS 



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69 


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90 


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89 


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CB 2F 


C280: 


9A 


CC 


00 


10 


00 


80 


10 


00 


06 


C4F0; 


EE 


35 03 


A9 


88 


30 


11 


D0 


41 


C760:A6 


02 


B9 


C7 


02 


00 


20 


B9 DA 


C288: 


A9 


FE 


9D 


08 


D0 


C8 


E8 


E8 


3B 


C4F8^ 


A0 


00 A2 


00 


36 


02 


8C 


Dl 


4E 


C768:04 


02 


E8 


E8 


E8 


E8 


20 


06 BF 


C290: 


C0 


04 


D0 


C7 


A2 


03 


FE 


2B 


58 


C500: 


02 


98 AA 


B9 


E4 


02 


F0 


18 


CC 


C770:CB 


CA 


CA 


CA 


CA 


BD 


04 


D0 C4 


C298: 


D0 


CA 


10 


FA 


A5 


C5 


C9 


28 


EA 


C508: 


FE 


2D D0 


FE 


E2 


02 


00 


10 


39 


C778:F0 


0F 


C9 


FF 


D0 


14 


89 


98 60 


C2A0: 


F0 


04 


C9 


2B 


D0 


38 


EE 


Dl 


A2 


C510: 


A9 


00 99 


E4 


02 


B9 


9C 


CC 


EE 


C780:CC 


49 


FF 


20 


10 


D0 


4C 


8F 87 


C2A8: 


02 


D0 


57 


CE 


02 


02 


D0 


52 


CD 


C518: 


49 


FF 20 


15 


00 


8D 


15 


00 


F6 


C788:C7 


B9 


93 


CC 


00 


10 


00 


30 22 


C2B0: 


A0 


0D 


3C 


D2 


02 


C9 


28 


D0 


E0 


C520: 


B9 


00 DC 


48 


29 


10 


99 


C3 


29 


C790:10 


00 


AD 


10 


00 


39 


98 


CC 7C 


C2B9: 


12 


AD 


13 


03 


18 


69 


0A 


C9 


89 


C528: 


02 


63 29 


0F 


85 


FB 


A9 


0F 


63 


C798:F0 


15 


BD 


04 


00 


38 


F9 


34 6D 


C2C0: 


64 


F0 


3F 


EE 


30 


07 


EE 


F4 


FB 


C530: 


38 


E5 FB 


99 


CI 


02 


00 


08 


2A 


C7A0:03 


90 


03 


D0 


90 


13 


B9 


9A 06 


C2C8: 


CE 


D0 


0E 


AO 


13 


03 


38 


E9 


85 


C538: 


99 


C0 03 


99 


C2 


03 


F0 


55 


14 


C7A8:CC 


00 


10 


D0 


4C 


CI 


C7 


BD A7 


C2D0: 


0A 


F0 


2F 


CE 


30 


07 


CE 


F4 


9A 


C540: 


C9 


01 F0 


54 


FE 


C5 


02 


BD 


25 


C7B0:04 


D0 


33 


F9 


34 


03 


90 


08 0E 


C2D8: 


CE 


80 


13 


03 


D0 


24 


C9 


05 


6B 


C548: 


C5 


02 C9 


5A 


00 


47 


A9 


00 


00 i 


C788:D0 


89 


9A 


CC 


49 


FF 


20 


10 F3 


C2E0: 


D0 


04 


A2 


04 


00 


0E 


C9 


06 


BC 


C550: 


90 


C5 02 


B9 


CI 


02 


C9 


02 


A3 


C7C0:D0 


80 


10 


D0 


80 


05 


00 


38 07 


C2E8: 


D0 


04 


A2 


09 


D0 


06 


C9 


3 


Fl 


C558: 


00 


0A A 9 


0F 


99 


C7 


02 


99 


7E 


C7C8:F9 


34 


03 


9D 


09 


00 


89 


D6 72 


C2F0: 


D0 


10 


A2 


0E 


A0 


04 


BD 


93 


3C ; 


C560: 


C9 


02 D0 


31 


C9 


04 


D0 


11 


8F 


C7O0:02 


F0 


03 


4C 


OF 


C9 


B9 


D8 35 


C2F8: 


CE 


99 


FB 


02 


CA 


88 


10 


F6 


7B 


C568: 


20 


A2 CB 


OE 


FA 


07 


B9 


FA 


76 


C7O8:02 


F0 


02 


D0 


F6 


89 


CF 


02 33 


C300: 


30 


03 


4C 


52 


C2 


A9 


2B 


80 


AF 


C570: 


07 


C9 IF 


00 


lA 


A9 


27 


D0 


79 


C7E0:D0 


40 


89 


C3 


02 


F0 


03 


4C C5 


C308: 


11 


D0 


A9 


ID 


80 


13 


D0 


A9 


68 


C578: 


13 


C9 08 


D0 


18 


20 


A2 


CB 


60 


C7E3:CA 


C3 


A9 


01 


99 


CF 


02 


A9 0F 


C310: 


D8 


8D 


16 


00 


A0 


00 


8C 


ID 


72 


C580; 


FE 


FA 07 


B9 


FA 


07 


C9 


28 


76 


C7F0:40 


80 


12 


D4 


A9 


41 


80 


12 13 


C318: 


D0 


8C 


17 


00 


84 


FB 


84 


FD 


36 


C588: 


00 


05 A9 


20 


99 


FA 


07 


B9 


75 


C7F8:D4 


89 


FA 


07 


99 


02 


02 


BD 08 


C320: 


A9 


04 


85 


FC 


A9 


D8 


85 


FE 


B3 


C590: 


FA 


07 99 


FC 


07 


4C 


11 


C6 


80 


C300:04 


00 


9D 


00 


00 


BD 


05 


00 03 


C328: 


A2 


03 


A9 


CF 


91 


FB 


A9 


0B 


CE 


C598: 


A9 


30 80 


04 


04 


A9 


81 


8D 


E8 


C308:9D 


01 


D0 


AD 


10 


00 


39 


98 6C 


C330; 


91 


FD 


C8 


D0 


F5 


E6 


FC 


E6 


52 


C5A0: 


04 


D4 FE 


CD 


02 


B9 


CD 


02 


B4 


C810:CC 


F0 


08 


AD 


10 


00 


19 


96 AC 


C338: 


PE 


CA 


D0 


EE 


A9 


CF 


91 


FB 


A6 


C5A8: 


CO 


FF .02 


D0 


64 


A9 


00 


99 


CB 


C818:CC 


D0 


03 


B9 


96 


CC 


49 


FF 58 


C340: 


A9 


0B 


91 


FD 


C8 


C0 


E8 


00 


50 


C5B0: 


CD 


02 89 


C7 


02 


00 


38 


89 


DA 


C820:2O 


10 


D0 


80 


10 


00 


AD 


15 73 


C348: 


F3 


A9 


00 


85 


FD 


A9 


04 


85 


B0 


C5B8: 


C0 


03 00 


38 


89 


C2 


03 


00 


E2 


C828:O0 


19 


96 


CC 


80 


15 


00 


98 03 


C350: 


FE 


A9 


90 


85 


FB 


A2 


03 


A0 


3D 


C5C0: 


24 


A9 05 


85 


FE 


B9 


D4 


02 


4C 


C830:AA 


89 


27 


00 


F0 


0F 


FE 


38 71 


C358: 


07 


A9 


2F 


91 


FD 


A9 


6F 


91 


03 


C5C8: 


38 


E9 20 


AA 


BD 


F2 


CF 


09 


CC 


C838:03 


BO 


38 


03 


C9 


0A 


00 


05 0F 


C360 


FB 


38 


10 


F5 


18 


AS 


FB 


69 


22 


C5O0: 


FA 


07 F0 


0C 


E8 


C6 


FE 


00 


AB 


C840:A9 


00 


99 


27 


D0 


DE 


E0 


02 12 


C358 


28 


85 


FB 


90 


03 


E6 


FC 


18 


83 


C508: 


F3 


98 AA 


FE 


C0 


03 


00 


17 


94 


C348:D0 


0E 


AD 


FD 


02 


99 


E0 


02 95 


C370 


A 9 


28 


65 


FD 


85 


FD 


90 


02 


AA 


C5E0: 


98 


AA FE 


C2 


03 


20 


A2 


CB 


19 


C350:A6 


02 


8 9 


02 


02 


20 


06 


CB 82 


C378 


E6 


FE 


CA 


D0 


DA 


A0 


00 


A9 


B6 


C5E8: 


B9 


C9 02 


C9 


0F 


D0 


22 


FE 


9F 


C858:A6 


02 


BO 


00 


00 


F0 


0F 


C9 A7 


C380 


BB 


99 


24 


05 


88 


10 


FA 


A9 


45 


C5F0: 


C0 


03 A9 


00 


99 


C7 


02 


B9 


7C 


C860:FF 


D0 


14 


B9 


96 


CC 


49 


FF BE 


C388 


4C 


85 


FB 


A9 


05 


85 


FC 


A0 


8A 


C5F8: 


FA 


07 99 


04 


02 


DE 


C9 


02 


65 


C868:2D 


10 


D0 


4C 


74 


C8 


AD 


10 A5 


C390 


00 


A2 


08 


A9 


88 


91 


F8 


A5 


IE 


C600. 


B9 


C9 02 


CD 


FB 


02 


00 


06 


89 


C870:O0 


19 


96 


CC 


SO 


10 


00 


BD 5C 


C398 


FB 


18 


69 


28 


85 


FB 


90 


02 


13 


C608: 


AD 


FC 02 


99 


C9 


02 


20 


84 


00 


C878:01 


D0 


C9 


27 


F0 


49 


C9 


F0 98 


C3A0 


E6 


FC 


CA 


00 


EE 


80 


ID 


CF 


B9 


C610 


CB 


FE CB 


02 


B9 


C7 


02 


F0 


BE 


C880:F0 


45 


AD 


10 


00 


39 


96 


CC F7 


C3A8 


. 9D 


90 


29 


80 


24 


CF 


90 


60 


20 


C618 


19 


FE 36 


03 


80 


36 


03 


C9 


7F 


C888;D0 


09 


80 


00 


D0 


C9 


0C 


F0 33 ' 


C3B0 


i34 


E8 


E0 


07 


00 


EF 


98 


A2 


33 


C620 


6E 


D0 0F 


A 9 


00 


90 


36 


03 


7B 


C890:36 


D0 


09 


BD 


00 


00 


C9 


48 90 


C3B8 


:09 


9D 


A7 


02 


CA 


10 


FA 


A9 


77 


C628 


80 


34 03 


C9 


01 


F0 


03 


DE 


4F 


C398:F0 


20 


D0 


2E 


18 


C9 


75 


90 4E 


C3C0 


:00 


A8 


99 


34 


03 


C8 


C0 


07 


AC 


C630 


.34 


3 A6 


02 


89 


CB 


02 


18 


A6 


C3A0:0r 


C9 


E3 


80 


08 


BD 


01 


D0 05 


C3C8 


:D0 


F8 


EE 


FE 


03 


AO 


FE 


03 


94 


C638 


:D9 


C9 02 


10 


03 


4C 


CE 


C7 


15 


C8A8:C9 


67 


F0 


IB 


C9 


AE 


F0 


17 CA 


C3D0 


:A0 


01 


38 


E9 


0A 


F0 


07 


C8 


79 


C640 


:A9 


00 99 


CB 


02 


BD 


05 


00 


74 


C8B0:8D 


01 


D0 


18 


C9 


63 


90 


12 20 


C3D8 


:C0 


0A 


00 


F6 


F0 


0A 


8C 


FC 


92 


C648 


:C9 


30 F0 


41 


C9 


E6 


00 


03 


87 


C8B3;C9 


AF 


80 


0E 


BD 


00 


D0 


C9 6B 



044 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




PROGRAMS 



C8C0 


75 


F0 


04 


C9 


E2 


D0 


03 


20 


E6 


CB30:CB 


FE 


00 


D0 


FE 


01 


D0 


60 


78 


CDA0:05 


F0 


00 


09 


E0 


00 


01 


F0 85 


C8C8 


44 


CB 


A9 


00 


85 


FC 


BO 


01 


41 


CB38: 


C9 


22 


00 


04 


FE 


00 


D0 


60 


91 


GDA8 


:00 


01 


FB 


20 


01 


FF 


E0 


01 D0 


C8D0 


D0 


38 


E9 


28 


4A 


4A 


4A 


A2 


4B 


CB40: 


DE 


00 


D0 


60 


B9 


29 


D0 


99 


15 


CDB0 


:FF 


E0 


03 


FF 


E0 


07 


F9 


E0 DC 


C8D8 


05 


18 


06 


FC 


0A 


90 


02 


E6 


01 


CB4 8: 


27 


D0 


B9 


96 


CC 


49 


FF 


20 


01 


COB 8 


:07 


81 


00 


0F 


02 


00 


0G 


04 55 


C8E0 


FC 


E0 


03 


D0 


06 


A4 


FC 


84 


07 


CB50: 


15 


D0 


80 


15 


00 


A9 


00 


99 


70 


CDC0 


:00 


00 


C0 


00 


IF 


E0 


00 


03 F3 


C8E8 


FE 


85 


FD 


CA 


00 


EB 


18 


65 


93 


CB53: 


08 


02 


99 


38 


03 


99 


CF 


02 


B3 


C0C8 


:F0 


00 


03 


F0 


00 


0F 


C0 


00 0A 


C8F0 


FD 


85 


FB 


90 


03 


E6 


FC 


18 


31 


CB60 


99 


06 


02 


60 


A9 


00 


SO 


EA 


14 


COD0 


:3F 


C0 


01 


FF 


00 


0F 


FF 


00 98 


C8F8 


AS 


FC 


65 


FE 


85 


FC 


A6 


02 


A8 


CB68 


02 


A9 


08 


8D 


E8 


02 


BD 


A7 


B7 


CDD8 


:0F 


FF 


00 


01 


FF 


00 


00 


3F 4B 


C900 


ED 


00 


00 


38 


E9 


08 


08 


4A 


E5 


CB70 


02 


0A 


0A 


0A 


AS 


8C 


E9 


02 


BA 


CDE0 


:C0 


00 


0F 


C0 


00 


03 


F0 


00 BS 


C908 


4A 


4A 


28 


90 


13 


48 


AC 


Dl 


46 


CB78 


AC 


E9 


02 


B9 


21 


CE 


AC 


EA 


45 


CDE8 


:03 


F0 


00 


IF 


C0 


00 


00 


E0 IB 


C910 


02 


AD 


10 


D0 


39 


96 


CC 


F0 


CD 


CB80 


02 


91 


FB 


EE 


E9 


02 


EE 


EA 


0C 


CDF0 


:00 


00 


C0 


0C 


04 


00 


0F 


02 AS 


C918 


06 


68 


18 


69 


20 


D0 


01 


68 


11 


CB8 8 


02 


CE 


E8 


02 


00 


EA 


E8 


E0 


F6 


CDFS 


:00 


07 


81 


00 


07 


F9 


E0 


03 6B 


C920 


18 


6 5 


FB 


90 


02 


E6 


FC 


85 


CC 


CB90 


05 


F0 


0E 


E0 


0A 


F0 


0A 


E0 


BF 


CE00 


:FF 


E0 


01 


FF 


E0 


01 


FF 


E0 El 


C928 


FB 


A2 


03 


18 


06 


FB 


26 


FC 


AD 


CB98 


0E 


F0 


06 


E0 


12 


F0 


02 


00 


6B 


CE08 


;01 


FB 


20 


01 


F0 


00 


09 


E0 B3 


C930 


CA 


D0 


F8 


A5 


FC 


18 


69 


20 


12 


CBA0 


,C8 


60 


FE 


C9 


02 


B9 


C9 


02 


BD 


CE10 


:00 


05 


F0 


00 


03 


F0 


00 


01 E9 


C938 


85 


FC 


AE 


Dl 


02 


FE 


E6 


02 


9C 


CBA8 


.C9 


10 


00 


03 


DE 


C9 


02 


B9 


4F 


CE18 


:E0 


00 


01 


E0 


00 


01 


F0 


00 3A 


C940 


BD 


E6 


02 


CD 


FE 


02 


D0 


0D 


33 


CBB0 


C7 


02 


00 


0E 


B9 


C9 


02 


4A 


EA 


CE20 


:00 


AA 


3A 


22 


22 


22 


22 


22 DB 


C948 


A9 


00 


90 


E6 


02 


A0 


04 


Bl 


IF 


CBB8 


.AA 


BD 


EA 


CF 


99 


34 


03 


AE 


CI 


CE28 


:8A 


AA 


SA 


0A 


8A 


SA 


SA 


SA C5 


C950 


FB 


C9 


C2 


F0 


03 


4C 


D7 


C9 


7E 


CBC0 


.Dl 


02 


60 


A9 


3C 


8D 


15 


D0 


7B 


CE30 


:8A 


AA 


0A 


22 


A2 


8A 


2A 


22 D6 


C958 


AC 


Dl 


02 


B9 


CF 


02 


F0 


F5 


F0 


CBC8 


.A9 


80 


8D 


0B 


D4 


A9 


81 


80 


95 


CE38 


:02 


AA 


SA 


22 


A2 


8 A 


A2 


22 9B 


C960 


00 


00 


D0 


20 


A2 


02 


18 


AD 


6B 


CBD0 


:0B 


04 


A9 


31 


99 


FA 


07 


99 


CB 


CE40 


:8A 


AA 


2A 


2A 


2A 


2A 


22 


02 F5 


C968 


01 


D0 


C9 


Dl 


B0 


02 


90 


67 


ID 


CBD8 


:FC 


07 


C0 


00 


F0 


06 


20 


23 


CB 


CE48 


:8A 


AA 


02 


2A 


0A 


22 


A2 


22 F8 


C970: 


A0 


07 


B9 


15 


CF 


91 


FB 


88 


E3 


CBE0 


:CC 


4C 


E7 


CB 


20 


4E 


CC 


A9 


29 


CE50 


3A 


AA 


8A 


2A 


2A 


0A 


22 


22 Bl 


C978: 


10 


F8 


AC 


Dl 


02 


A9 


01 


99 


57 


CBE8 


;07 


80 


DC 


02 


E8 


D0 


FD 


AE 


58 


CE53 


3A 


AA 


02 


A2 


A2 


SA 


8A 


8A 2F 


C980: 


D6 


02 


D0 


0C 


AD 


03 


00 


A2 


98 


CBF0 


:D1 


02 


98 


30 


04 


A9 


0A 


D0 


B3 


CE60 


SA 


AA 


SA 


22 


22 


8A 


22 


22 03 


C988: 


06 


18 


C9 


48 


B0 


49 


90 


E0 


8F 


CBFS 


;02 


A9 


07 


9D 


29 


00 


C8 


D0 


A5 


CE68 


8A 


AA 


SA 


22 


22 


82 


A2 


8A 54 


C990: 


18 


BD 


Bl 


02 


69 


05 


90 


Bl 


42 


CC00 


:EB 


CE 


OC 


02 


00 


E6 


AD 


FE 


7B 


CE70 


8 A 


DA 


00 


02 


B2 


30 


05 


4D 19 


C998: 


02 


C9 


0A 


D0 


19 


A9 


00 


9D 


FA 


CC08 


:03 


CD 


13 


03 


F0 


03 


4C 


BF 


15 


CE78 


40 


0A 


B3 


60 


0B 


4A 


A0 


19 11 


C9A0: 


Bl 


02 


CA 


FE 


Bl 


02 


BD 


Bl 


99 


CC10 


:C3 


A9 


0B 


8D 


11 


00 


A9 


15 


64 


CE80 


55 


50 


15 


4A 


90 


0A 


B5 


60 9C 


C9A8: 


02 


C9 


0A 


00 


09 


A9 


00 


9D 


8A 


CC18 


:8D 


18 


D0 


A9 


C8 


80 


16 


00 


AC 


CE88 


09 


4D 


50 


06 


B5 


20 


01 


53 EB 


C9B0: 


Bl 


02 


CA 


FE 


Bl 


02 


AC 


01 


A7 


CC20 


:4C 


IC^ 


CI 


A2 


02 


BD 


Bl 


02 


B5 


CE90 


40 


00 


54 


04 


05 


03 


12 


5A CB 


C9B8: 


02 


D0 


10 


A2 


0A 


A9 


30 


85 


8A 


CC28 


:F0 


IE 


18 


7D 


A8 


02 


9D 


A3 


CO 


CE98 


03 


04 


02 


0C 


3C 


02 


03 


01 AA 


C9C0: 


FB 


A9 


2E 


85 


FC 


20 


64 


CB 


D7 


CC30 


:02 


IS 


C9 


0A 


90 


12 


38 


E9 


Dl 


CEA0 


06 


IE 


3E 


4E 


IE 


C8 


30 


30 lA 


C9C8: 


4C 


D7 


C9 


A2 


0E 


A9 


70 


35 


59 


CC38 


?0A 


90 


A8 


02 


CA 


10 


05 


EE 


03 


CEA8 


23 


27 


23 


27 


31 


31 


00 


FF C6 


C9D0: 


FB 


A9 


2E 


8 5 


FC 


D0 


EE 


AC 


A0 


CC40 


;A7 


02 


00 


03 


FE 


A8 


02 


ES 


FF 


CEB0 


00 


00 


00 


77 


07 


00 


05 


00 08 


C9D8: 


Dl 


02 


A6 


02 


4C 


27 


CA 


BD 


ID 


CC48 


:CA 


10 


DA 


A 6 


02 


60 


A2 


02 


E9 


CEB8 


00 


00 


0C 


07 


00 


05 


00 


01 50 


C9E0: 


00 


D0 


9D 


0C 


D0 


A9 


00 


99 


E3 


CC50 


:BD 


B5 


02 


F0 


IE 


18 


70 


AD 


7F 


CEC0 


00 


09 


00 


00 


5A 


F6 


IF 


7B 09 


C9E8; 


E2 


02 


BD 


01 


00 


9D 


0D 


D0 


IE 


CC58 


:02 


90 


AO 


02 


18 


C9 


0A 


90 


BC 


CEC8 


20 


86 


B3 


20 


0C 


05 


16 


5 36 


C9F0; 


AD 


10 


00 


39 


96 


CC 


D0 


0B 


Al 


CC60 


:12 


38 


E9 


0A 


90 


AD 


02 


CA 


61 


CEO0 


0C 


20 


31 


20 


6C 


7B 


20 


86 BC 


C9F8: 


B9 


9C 


CC 


49 


FF 


2D 


10 


00 


64 


CC68 


:10 


05 


EE 


AC 


02 


00 


03 


FS 


4C 


CEOS 


B5 


20 


0C 


05 


16 


05 


0C 


20 23 


CA00: 


4C 


09 


CA 


AD 


10 


D0 


19 


9C 


C4 


CC70 


:AD 


02 


E8 


CA 


10 


DA 


60 


48 


20 


CEE0 


32 


20 


6C 


7B 


20 


86 


B7 


20 8F 


CA08: 


CC 


8D 


10 


D0 


AD 


15 


D0 


19 


F2 


CC78 


:AD 


10 


D0 


39 


98 


CC 


00 


09 


30 


CEE8 


0C 


05 


16 


05 


0C 


20 


33 


20 48 


CA10: 


9C 


CC 


8D 


15 


D0 


A9 


01 


99 


F2 


CC80 


:BD 


04 


D0 


C9 


14 


F0 


0C 


D0 


FO 


CEF0 


6C 


7B 


20 


AD 


32 


30 


AB 


20 4C 


CA18; 


E4 


02 


A9 


80 


8D 


0B 


D4 


A9 


C9 


CC8S 


:07 


BO 


04 


D0 


C9 


42 


F0 


03 


DE 


CEF8 


20 


12 


0E 


04 


13 


20 


6C 


7B 9 A 


CA20: 


31 


8D 


0B 


D4 


20 


44 


CB 


C0 


F2 


CC90 


:18 


90 


01 


38 


68 


60 


01 


02 


C6 


CF00 


20 


9E 


20 


20 


12 


05 


13 


14 3C 


CA28: 


00 


D0 


lA 


AD 


05 


D0 


38 


C9 


B5 


CC98 


04 


08 


10 


20 


40 


80 


18 


00 


6E 


CF08: 


01 


12 


14 


20 


6C 


88 


88 


88 50 


CA30: 


D2 


90 


40 


AD 


10 


D0 


39 


98 


A6 


CCA0 


.00 


18 


00 


00 


IS 


00 


00 


3C 


3D 


CF10: 


00 


22 


22 


22 


00 


88 


BE 


BE FC 


CA38: 


CC 


F0 


45 


AD 


04 


D0 


18 


C9 


51 


CCAS 


00 


00 


3C 


00 


00 


3C 


00 


00 


BA 


CFIS: 


BC 


BE 


FE 


BC 


EE 


CS 


C8 


C3 66 


CA40: 


03 


90 


3D 


B0 


18 


AD 


07 


00 


34 


CCB0 


7E 


00 


04 


7E 


20 


04 


FF 


20 


23 


CF20: 


00 


32 


32 


32 


8C 


8C 


8C 


00 65 


CA48: 


18 


C9 


46 


B0 


33 


AD 


10 


00 


71 


CCBS 


.04 


FF 


20 


07 


FF 


E0 


0F 


C3 


2E 


CF28: 


23 


23 


23 


00 


32 


A0 


57 


40 89 


CA50: 


39 


98 


CC 


D0 


2B 


IS 


AD 


06 


6A 


CCC0 


F0 


0F 


C3 


F0 


07 


00 


E0 


03 


IB 


CF30: 


8D 


19 


8D 


6E 


IF 


9E 


IF 


CE F5 


CASS: 


D0 


C9 


56 


B0 


23 


C0 


00 


D0 


SB 


CCCB 


.00 


C0 


00 


00 


40 


60 


00 


81 


97 


CF38: 


IF 


FE 


IF 


09 


08 


0A 


0E 


00 8F 


CA60: 


0E 


AD 


Bl 


02 


F0 


17 


AD 


B2 


B0 


CCD0 


.E0 


01 


03 


C0 


0F 


3F 


C0 


0F 


3D 


CF40: 


00 


00 


00 


00 


IF 


77 


EA 


IB A 7 


CA68' 


02 


C9 


02 


D0 


10 


F0 


11 


AD 


D2 


CCD8 


:FF 


80 


0F 


FF 


00 


0F 


FF 


00 


B0 


CF4S: 


57 


AA 


0B 


42 


EE 


0E 


72 


A4 FC 


CA70' 


B5 


02 


F0 


09 


AD 


B6 


02 


C9 


26 


CCE0 


.09 


BF 


00 


00 


IF 


00 


00 


0F 


F6 


CF50: 


IB 


00 


E6 


IB 


FF 


7F 


C3 


FC 3E 


CA78: 


02 


D0 


02 


F0 


03 


4C 


C3 


CB 


2F 


CCE8 


20 


00 


IF 


40 


00 


IF 


80 


00 


F7 


CF58: 


7F 


E7 


FE 


7F 


E7 


FE 


00 


E7 AC 1 


CA80 


C0 


00 


D0 


36 


AD 


15 


D0 


29 


80 


CCF0 


0F 


00 


00 


0F 


00 


00 


IF 


00 


41 


CF60: 


0E 


70 


C7 


0£ 


7F 


E7 


FE 


7F 16 


CA88' 


02 


F0 


65 


AD 


10 


D0 


29 


06 


FE 


CCFS 


00 


00 


IF 


00 


00 


0F 


00 


00 


B2 


CF68: 


E7 


FE 


70 


E7 


0E 


70 


E7 


0E 58 


CA90 


F0 


06 


C9 


06 


F0 


02 


D0 


58 


43 


CD00 


0F 


00 


00 


IF 


80 


00 


IF 


40 


97 


CF70: 


70 


E7 


0E 


70 


E7 


0E 


7F 


C3 45 


CA98 


AD 


04 


D0 


38 


ED 


02 


D0 


18 


04 


CD08 


00 


0F 


20 


00 


IF 


00 


09 


BF 


36 


CF78: 


FC 


7F 


E7 


FE 


7F 


E7 


FE 


00 FC 


CAA0 


C9 


09 


90 


04 


C9 


F7 


90 


48 


47 


CD10 


00 


0F 


FF 


00 


0F 


FF 


00 


0F 


F6 


CF80: 


E7 


0E 


70 


E7 


0E 


70 


E7 


0E 34 


CAA8 


AD 


05 


D0 


38 


ED 


03 


D0 


18 


29 


CD18 


FF 


80 


0F 


3F 


C0 


01 


03 


C0 


7A 


CF88: 


70 


E7 


0E 


70 


E7 


0E 


7F 


E7 81 


CAB0 


C9 


09 


90 


C9 


C9 


F7 


90 


38 


A3 


CD20 


00 


81 


E0 


00 


40 


60 


00 


00 


BB 


CF90: 


FE 


7F 


E7 


FE 


7F 


C3 


FC 


70 Fl 


CAB8 


B0 


C3 


AD 


15 


00 


29 


01 


F0 


EC 


CD28 


03 


00 


C0 


07 


00 


E0 


0F 


C3 


33 


CF98: 


E3 


F8 


78 


E3 


FS 


7C 


E3 


F3 30 


CAC0 


2F 


AD 


10 


D0 


29 


09 


F0 


06 


BD 


CO30 


.F0 


0F 


C3 


F0 


07 


FF 


E0 


04 


80 


CFA0: 


7E 


E0 


E0 


7F 


E0 


E0 


7F 


E0 36 


CAC8 


C9 


09 


F0 


02 


D0 


22 


AD 


06 


34 


CD38 


FF 


20 


04 


FF 


20 


04 


7E 


20 


8A 


CFA8: 


E0 


77 


E0 


E0 


73 


E0 


E0 


71 13 


CAD0 


D0 


38 


ED 


00 


00 


18 


C9 


09 


IE 


CD40 


00 


7E 


00 


00 


3C 


00 


00 


3C 


99 


CFB0: 


E3 


F8 


70 


E3 


F8 


70 


E3 


FS 17 


CADS 


90 


04 


C9 


F7 


90 


12 


AD 


07 


9F 


C048 


00 


00 


3C 


00 


00 


18 


00 


00 


CB 


CFB8: 


El 


CE 


0E 


El 


CF 


IE 


El 


CF 67 


CAE0 


D0 


38 


ED 


01 


D0 


18 


C9 


09 


3E 


CD50 


18 


00 


00 


18 


00 


00 


55 


06 


FA 


CFC0: 


IE 


El 


CF 


BE 


El 


CF 


FE 


El FB 


CAE8 


90 


93 


C9 


F7 


90 


02 


B0 


8D 


OF 


CD58 


tF6 


FA 


FA 


F6 


06 


55 


FE 


D6 


DD 


CFC8: 


CF 


FE 


El 


CE 


4E 


El 


CE 


0E DE 


CAF0 


A5 


C5 


C9 


36 


D0 


03 


4C 


11 


A3 


CD60 


.C2 


D6 


C2 


06 


82 


AA 


03 


00 


90 


CFD0: 


FF 


CE 


0E 


FF 


CE 


0E 


7F 


8E 22 


CAF8 


CC 


Cfl 


E8 


E8 


C0 


02 


F0 


03 


C5 


CD68 


.00 


07 


F8 


00 


0F 


C0 


00 


0F 


6F 


CFD3: 


0E 


0E 


37 


23 


25 


3C 


30 


3E EE 


CB00 


4C 


FC 


C4 


4C 


F8 


C4 


C9 


20 


E8 


CD70 


C0 


00 


03 


F0 


00 


03 


FC 


00 


El 


CFE0: 


3F 


02 


06 


02 


06 


00 


00 


88 3 A 


CB08 


.F0 


11 


C9 


21 


F0 


0A 


C9 


27 


12 


CD78 


'00 


FF 


80 


00 


FF 


F0 


00 


FF 


E7 


CFES: 


89 


A0 


08 


07 


06 


05 


04 


03 36 


CB10 


.D0 


0D 


DE 


00 


D0 


4C 


IB 


CB 


E8 


CD60 


F0 


00 


FF 


80 


03 


FC 


00 


03 


AB 


CFF0: 


02 


02 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 Bl 


CB18 


;FE 


00 


D0 


DE 


01 


D0 


60 


C9 


00 


CD88 


.F0 


00 


0F 


C0 


00 


0F 


C0 


00 


48 


CFF8: 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


00 


00 ID 


CB20 


:24 


F0 


11 


C9 


23 


F0 


0A 


C9 


7F 


CD90 


:07 


F8 


00 


03 


01 


F0 


00 


01 


EA 


















CB28 


.25 


D0 


0D 


DE 


00 


D0 


4C 


34 


26 


CD98 


rE0 


00 


01 


E0 


00 


03 


F0 


00 


C0 
















B 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE a-35 




D 



ROGRAMS 



JOE 



R Y K O W S K i 



This handy little routine transfers a 
block of data from one location in 
128 memor>' to another. It sounds 
simple, but simple can mean pow- 
erful as in the case of this short ma- 
chine language routine. 

Xtrax transfers data between 
Bank and Bank 1. This can be im- 
portant if you Ye writing a program 
that uses a lot of hi-res graphics 
screens, sprites, or text. Just set aside 
enough memory in Bank 1 for your 
program, and with this routine Bank 1 
becomes a buffer for that data. Xtrax 
also provides an overlay option, mak- 
ing it easy to display multiple screens. 

Getting Started 

Xtrax consists of two parts, the pro- 
gram itself and a demonstration. 
Xtrax is written entirely in machine 
language, so use A/LX our machine 
language entry program, lo type it in; 
see "Typing Aids" elsewhere in this 
section. When A/L.Y prompts you, re- 
spond with the values below. 

Starting address: 1B74 
Ending address: 1C05 

Be sure to save the program before 
you exit MLX, 

The demonstration program is 
written in BASIC. Use The Automatic 
Proofreader, found elsewhere in this 
section, to type it in. 

The demo will call Xtrax, so be 
sure Xtrax is on the same disk and has 
been saved with that name. The dem- 
onstration will draw a circle in the 
center of the screen. Xtrax will then 
copy the circle to Bank 1 . 

After this, the screen clears and 
two intersecting lines are drawn. Then 
the data in Bank I is overlayed on the 
top and bottom portions of the screen 
thai contains the intersecting lines. 
There are now two circles on the hi- 
res screen with the intersecting lines. 
The data in Bank 1 was copied to iwo 
different screen locations. 

Using the Program 

Xirax is a subroutine used from with- 
in another program. To load and run 



it, type BLOAD ^^XTRAX"-BO, 
P7028, To transfer data, determine 
the low- and high-byte values of the 
source and target addresses. 

The demo program does this at 
line number 160. This is where the 
data to be transferred is being passed 
from the address range 28160-32319 
to the destination address 8192. In the 
hexadecimal number system, these 
addresses are $6E00-$7E3F and 
$2000, respectively. 




The 128 works with addresses as 
two-byte values, with each byte hold- 
ing two digits of the hexadecimal ad- 
dress. Thus, for the first address 
above, the byte values are $6E and 
$00. The former is the high byte; the 
latter, the low byte. Converting back 
to decimal, these values become 1 10 
and 0. The decimal pair for the end- 
of-source require a 1 be added to each, 
with the result being 1 26 and 64. For 
the target address, the byte values are 
32 and 0. The part of the demo pro- 
gram that instructs Xtrax to make the 
transfer reads as follows: 

170 POKE 249,0: POKE 250,110 
180 POKE 251,64:POKE 252,126 
190 SYS 7028,0,32,6 

Generally, the format for a trans- 
fer is as follows: 

POKE 249, source starting value (low 
byte): POKE 250, source starting val- 
ue (high byte): POKE 251, source end- 
ing value + / (low byte): POKE 252, 
source ending value + 1 (high byte) 



This is followed by SYS 7028, 
destination value (low byte), destina- 
tion value (high byte), type of transfer. 

The demo type value of 6 refers 
to an overlay from Bank I to Bank 0. 
Additional transfer and overlay types 
are listed in the following table. 

Type Action 

Transfer (Bank only) 

1 Transfer from Bank to Bank 1 

2 Transfer from Bank I to Bank 

3 Transfer (Bank 1 only) 

4 Overlay (Bank only) 

5 Overlay Bank on Bank 1 

6 Overlay Bank I on Bank 

7 Overlay (Bank 1 only) 



XTRAX 



IB7A:Q5 


FD 


86 


FE 


8C 


FE 


IB 


A0 E4 


1B7C:04 


A9 


00 


99 


F9 


IB 


88 


D0 D6 


1B84:PA 


A9 


FD 


8D 


B9 


02 


A0 


01 53 


1B8C:AD 


FE 


IB 


29 


01 


F0 


03 


8C AD 


1B94:FB 


IB 


AD 


FE 


IB 


29 


02 


F0 A7 


1B9C:03 


8C 


FA 


IB 


AD 


FE 


IB 


29 51 


IBA4:04 


F0 


03 


8C 


FD 


IB 


A0 


00 DF 


1BAC:AE 


FA 


IB 


A9 


F9 


20 


74 


FF 30 


LBB4:AC 


FD 


IB 


C0 


01 


00 


10 


8D 29 


1BBC:FC 


IB 


A0 


00 


AE 


FB 


IB 


A9 91 


1BC4:FD 


20 


74 


FF 


4D 


FC 


IB 


AE D3 


1BCC:FB 


13 


A0 


00 


20 


77 


FF 


E6 Al 


1BD4:F9 


A5 


F9 


C9 


00 


D0 


02 


E6 ?B 


1BDC:FA 


A5 


FA 


C5 


FC 


D0 


09 


A5 98 


1BE4:F9 


C5 


FB 


D0 


03 


4C 


F9 


IB 6E 


1BEC:E6 


FD 


A5 


FD 


C9 


00 


D0 


02 9C 


XBP4:E6 


FE 


4C 


AA 


IB 


60 


00 


00 EC 


1BFC:00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 33 


DEMO 
















AB 10 BLOAD " 


XTRAX" 


,B0 


,P7028 


XJ 20 GRAPHIC 


U 


1 








SH 30 REM 


DRAW CIRCLE 






RQ 4 CIRCLE 


1,160, 


100 


,51 




SJ 50 PAINT 1 


,160,100 






JF 55 REM 


CIRCLE 


TO 


BANK 


1 


BH 60 POKE 


249,128: 


POKE 250,39 


RP 70 POKE 


251,192: 


POKE 252,55 


EQ 80 SYS 


7028,0 


,110,1 






MH 85 REM 


CLEAR 


SCREEN 






JX 90 GRAPHIC 


1, 


1 








HF 95 REM 


DRAW LINES 






FE 100 


DRAW 1 


,0, 


TO 319, 


199 


QJ 110 


DRAW 1 


,319,0 


TO 


0, 


199 


HS 115 


REM 


OVERLAY 


CIRCLES 


KG 120 


POKE249,00:POKE 


250,110 


DH 130 


POKE251,64:POKE 


252,126 


BD 140 


SYS 


7028, 


0,32,6 






RA 150 


POKE249,00:POKE 


250,110 


HE 160 


POKE251,64:POKE 


252,126 


SM 170 


SYS 


7028, 


0,47,6 




Q 



G-36 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




PROGRAMS 



MATTHEW 



S P [ N K S 



I've always been annoyed by pro- 
grams that require a SYS command 
to activate them. For starters, I can 
never remember all the SYS num- 
bers used by my various programs. 

Another problem occurs when 1 
need information to operate a ma- 
chine language program. It's never 
available directly from the program it- 
self, so Tm forced to search through 
all my back issues of magazines for 
the relevant article. 

One way around this problem is 
to use a separate BASIC loader that 
activates the program and includes 
any necessary documentation. This is 
not always the best solution, however. 
Loaders are time-consuming to set up, 
they clutter up disk directories, and 
they are clumsy to use. 

Loader-Maker is a short machine 
language utility designed to rectify' 
these problems. It allows the user to 
set up a BASIC program containing 
REM statements (or anything else) to 
which a SYS command to activate the 
program is automatically added. 

The program can then be saved 
as a single BASIC file. Gone is the 
need to remember SYS numbers or 
provide separate BASIC loaders for 
each program. 

Getting Started 

Loader-Maker is written entirely in 
machine language. To type it in, use 
MLX, our machine language entry 
program; see "Typing Aids" elsewhere 
in this section. When AfLA" prompts 
you, respond with the values given 
below. 

Starting address: 5000 
Ending address: 5137 

After you've finished typing in the 
program, be sure to save a copy of 
Loader-Maker before exiting MLX. 

Using Loader-Maker 

After you've produced a working copy 
of Loader-Maker, using it is simple. 
Simply load Loader-Maker, type 
NEW, and then load the machine lan- 
guage file to be converted. Set up your 



basic program with any documenta- 
tion you might want to include, and 
then type SYS 204m,sa.ea.ep, 

After the SYS command, sa and 
ea are the starting and ending ad- 
dresses of the machine language file, 
respectively, and ep is the program's 
entry point— that is, the SYS num- 
ber you would normally use to acti- 
vate the program. 






ADD SYS 
COMMANDS TO 

MACHINE 

LANGUAGE 

PROGRAMS TO 

ACTIVATE THEM 

AUTOMATICALLY 



After a short pause, the READY 
prompt should appear. If you list the 
program, you'll see your BASIC pro- 
gram, plus a new Une 63999, contain- 
ing a SYS command. Don't worr>' 
that the SYS number in this hne is dif- 
ferent from the one you provided. 
This SYS number calls a small pro- 
gram that moves the actual machine 
language file into its proper place and 
activates the program. Now, save the 
program as you would a normal 
BASIC file, using the format SAVE 
"filertame"SA • 

For example, to convert Loader- 
Maker itself into a single BASIC file, 
load Loader-Maker and type NEW. 
Type in some comments, for example, 



10 REM ACTIVATE WITH SYS 
20480,SA,EA,EP 

Then in immediate mode, type the 
command SYS 20480,20480,20787, 
42100 (this extra number will be ex- 
plained later). 

List the program to verify that 
line 63999 exists. Then save Loader- 
Maker using the format SAVE "Load- 
er-Maker",8,L Thaf s all there is to it. 

How It Works 

Loader-Maker works by searching un- 
til it finds the end of your BASIC pro- 
gram. It then calculates the SYS 
command needed to activate the pro- 
gram and appends it as line 63999. If a 
line 63999 already exists, it will be 
overwritten. A small machine lan- 
guage routine then moves the pro- 
gram back to its correct position on 
reloading. The machine code program 
is then added to the end of the BASIC 
program, and CLR is performed to 
reset any altered pointers. 

Things to Watch For 

Loader-Maker won't be able to con- 
vert machine language files that al- 
ready exist as a one-line basic SYS 
statement, such as SpeedScript 's 1 
SYS 2061. These programs already 
are in their optimal form. Nor will it 
cope with programs that begin be- 
tween 2048 ($0800) and 2061 ($080E), 
as these 14 bytes are needed to con- 
tain the BASIC SYS command. Plus, 
Loader-Maker will not run programs 
with entry points beneath BASIC or 
Kernal ROM (40960-491 59 and 
57344-65535, respectively). Also, 
Loader-Maker will not work with pro- 
grams residing between 20480 and 
20787 ($5000-$ 5 1 33), as Loader- 
Maker itself resides in this block. 

Loader-Maker will convert files 
that lie under BASIC or Kernal ROM, 
as long as their entry points exist in 
free memory. It will also convert pro- 
grams that would overlap the BASIC 
file, owing to the use of a downward 
machine language mover. The small 
restrictions placed on using Loader- 
Maker sltq not as harsh as they seem, 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 0-37 




PROGRAMS 



as most machine language programs 
reside either in the 4K block begin- 
ning at 49 1 52 (SCOOO) or at the top of 
memory. Of the dozens of stand-alone 
machine language programs I own, 
not one has been unable to be con- 
verted with Loader-Maker, 

Finally, Loader-Maker can be 
used with utilities that require param- 
eters that need to be supplied with the 
BASIC SYS command, such as those 
used with Loader-Maker itself 

Simply supply the value 42 1 00 
($A474) as the entry point when you 
use Loader-Maker, rather than the 
proper entry point. This will send the 
computer straight back to BASIC, 
rather than to the start of the actual 
program itself, which would generate 
an error because the required parame- 
ters would be missing. The proper 
syntax can then be given. 

Thus, as shown previously, to 
convert Loader- Maker into a BASIC 
file, type SYS 20480,20480,20787, 
42100. Once the BASIC loader has 
been run, simply use Loader- Maker 
as you normally would. 

LX)ADER-MAKER 



5009 


:20 


25 


51 


8D 


33 


51 


8C 


34 


29 


5008 


:51 


20 


25 


51 


8D 


35 


51 


3C 


83 


5010 


:36 


51 


20 


25 


51 


8D 


37 


51 


F6 


5018 


:8C 


38 


51 


A9 


FF 


85 


14 


A9 


B9 


5023 


:F9 


8 5 


15 


20 


13 


A6 


A5 


5F 


Al 


5023 


:85 


FB 


A5 


60 


85 


FC 


20 


59 


FE 


5030 


:A6 


20 


3 3 


AS 


18 


A5 


FB 


69 


A5 


5038 


:0D 


48 


A5 


FC 


69 


00 


35 


62 


AE 


5040 


:85 


FE 


68 


85 


63 


85 


FD 


A2 


98 


5048 


:90 


38 


20 


49 


BC 


20 


PF 


BD 


BB 


5050 


:A0 


0C 


B9 


F0 


50 


91 


FB 


88 


D3 


5058 


10 


F8 


A0 


05 


A2 


00 


BD 


00 


34 


5060 


:01 


F0 


07 


91 


FB 


C8 


E8 


4C 


D8 


50 6 8 


:5E 


50 


Afl 


27 


B9 


FD 


50 


91 


CA 


5070 


FD 


88 


10 


F8 


AD 


36 


51 


A0 


40 


5078 


01 


91 


FD 


AD 


33 


51 


A0 


05 


BD 


5080 


91 


FD 


AD 


36 


51 


38 


ED 


34 


FD 


5088 


51 


18 


69 


01 


65 


FE 


A0 


09 


86 


5090 


91 


FD 


AQ 


34 


51 


38 


E9 


01 


B2 


5098 


A0 


22 


91 


FD 


AD 


37 


51 


A0 


Bl 


50A0 


26 


91 


FD 


AD 


38 


51 


A0 


27 


C2 


50^8' 


91 


FD 


E6 


FE 


A 9 


00 


85 


FD 


B4 


50B0 


EE 


36 


51 


AD 


33 


51 


85 


FB 


41 


50B8' 


AD 


34 


51 


85 


FC 


78 


A5 


01 


D5 


50C0 


29 


FC 


85 


01 


A0 


00 


Bl 


FB 


5A 


50C8 


91 


FD 


C8 


D0 


F9 


E6 


FC 


E6 


24 


50D0' 


FE 


A5 


FC 


CD 


36 


51 


D0 


EE 


5E 


50D8 


A5 


01 


09 


03 


85 


01 


58 


A5 


64 


5OE0J 


FD 


85 


2D 


A4 


FE 


84 


2E 


20 


58 


50E8' 


59 


A6 


20 


33 


A5 


4C 


74 


A4 


03 


50F0: 


FF 


FF 


FF 


F9 


9E 


00 


00 


00 


26 


50F8' 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


A9 


00 


85 


C5 


5100: 


FE 


A9 


00 


85 


PD 


A9 


00 


85 


01 


5108; 


FC 


A9 


00 


85 


FB 


A0 


FF 


Bl 


FF 


5110: 


FB 


91 


FD 


88 


C0 


FF 


D0 


F7 


FC 


5118; 


C6 


FC 


C6 


FE 


A5 


FE 


C9 


00 


E2 


5120; 


DO 


ED 


4C 


00 


00 


20 


FD 


AE 


58 


5128: 


20 


8A 


AD 


20 


F7 


B7 


A 5 


14 


33 


5130: 


A4 


15 


60 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


76 



THE AUTOMATIC 
PROOFREADER 



PHILIP 



N E L S K 



The Automatic Proofreader helps you 
type in program listings for the 128 
and 64 and prevents nearly every kind 
of typing mistake. 

Type in the Proofreader exactly 
as listed. Because the program can't 
check itself type carefully to avoid 
mistakes. Don't omit any lines, even 
if they contain unusual commands. 
After you've finished, save a copy 
before running it. 

Next, type RUN and press RE- 
TURN. .After the program displays 
the message "Proofreader Active," 
you're ready to type in a BASIC 
program. 

Even^ time you finish typing a 
line and press RETURN, the Proof 
reader displays a two-letter checksum 
in the upper left corner of the screen. 
Compare this result with the two-let- 
ter checksum printed to the left of the 
line in the program listing. If the let- 
ters match, it's almost certain the line 
was typed correctly. If not, check for 
your mistake and correct the line. 

The Proofreader ignores spaces 
not enclosed in quotation marks, so 
you can omit or add spaces between 
keywords and still see a matching 
checksum. However, spaces inside 
quotes are almost always significant, 
so the program pays attention to 
them. 

The Proofreader does not accept 
key^'ord abbreviations (for example, ? 
instead of PRINT). If you prefer to 
use abbreviations, you can still check 
the line by LISTing it moving the 
cursor back to the line, and pressing 
RETURN. 

Though the Proofreader dotsrCx 
interfere with other BASIC opera- 
tions, it's a good idea to disable it 
before running another program. 



CLR 

10 VE==PEEKn72)+256*PE:EKt77 

3) tLn=43:HI^44:PRINT" 

fCLR} {WHTlAUTOMATIC PROO 

FREADER FOR "; 
29 IF VE^42364 THEN PRINT " 

64" 



30 IF VE=1716S THEN LO=45:H 
1=46: WAIT CLR: PRINT "128" 
40 SA=(PEEK{LO)+256*PEEK(HI 
))+6:FQR J=SA TO SA+166: 
READ BiPOKE J,B:CH=CH+B: 
NEXT 
50 IF CHO20570 THEN PRINT 
{SPACE} "*ERROR* CHECK TY 
PIMG IN DATA STATEMENTS" 
SEND 
60 FOR J=l TO 5:READ RF,LF, 
HFiRS^SA+RF:HB=INT fRS/25 
6) :LB=RS-(256*HB) 
70 CH=CH+RF+LF+HF: POKE SA+L 

F,LB:POKE SA+HF,HD:NEXT 
80 IF CHO22054 THEN PRINT 
{SPACE} "*ERR0R* RELOAD P 
ROGRAM AND CHECK FINAL L 
INE":END 
9C1 IF VE = 17165 THEN POKE SA 
+14,22:PnKE SA^18,23:P0K 
ESA+2 9,224:P0KESA+13 9,224 
100 POKE SA+149,PEEK(772) :P 
OKK SA+150,PEEK{773J :PR 
INT" {CLR} PROOFREADER AC 
TIVE" 
110 SYS SAiPOKE HI,PE:EK(HI) 
+1;P0KE (PEEK(LO)+256*P 
EEK(HI) )"l,n:NEW 
120 DATA120,169,73, 141,4,3, 
169,3,141,5,3,88,96,165 
,20,133,167 
130 DATA165, 21, 133, 168,169, 
0,141,0,255,162,31,181, 
199,157,227 
140 DATA3, 202, 16,248,169,19 
,32,210,255,169,18,32,2 
10,255,160 
150 DATA0rl32, 180, 132,176,1 
36,230,180,200,185,0,2, 
240,46,201 
160 DATA34, 208, 8, 72, 165,176 
,73,255,133,176,104,72, 
201,32,208 
170 DATA7,165,176,208,3,104 
,208,226,104,166,180,24 
,165,167 
180 DATA121,0,2,133,167,165 
,168,105,0,133,168,202, 
208,239,240 
190 DATA202, 165, 167,69, 168, 
72,41,15,168,185,211,3, 
32,210,255 
200 DATA134,74,74,74,74,168 
,185,211,3,32,210,255,1 
62,31,189 
210 DATA227,3,149,199,202,1 
6,248,169,146,32,210,25 
5,76,86,137 
220 DATA65,66,67,68,69,70,7 
1,72,74,75,77,80,81,82, 
83,88 
230 DATA 13,2,7,167,31,32,1 
51,116,117,151,128,129, 
167,136,137 (3 



0-38 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE'S 



Speed Script Dish 



A powerful word processing 
package for Commodore 64 
and 128 owners 

A Great Deal for Commodore 
Users! 

• SpeedScript for the 64 

• SpeedScript 128 — 80 -column version 

• Spelling checkers 

• Mail merge 

• Date-and-time stamp 

• 80-column preview for the 64 

• Turbo save and load 

• Plus more than a dozen other SpeedScript 
support utilities all on one disk (including 
full documentation) 




■ ESh Send me 



copies of COMPUTE'S 



SpeedScript Disk. 

I've enclosed SI 1,95 plus J2,00 postage and handling. (Outside 

US. and Canada add S 1 .00 for surface mail or f 3-00 for 

airmail.) 



ORDER NOW! 



Amount 

, Saks Tax" 



, Tola I 



Name , 



Address , 
Citv 



S[aie , 



ZIP- 



Mail personal check or money order to 

Commodore SpeedScript Disk 

324 W. Wendover Ave.. Ste. 200 

Greensboro, NC 27408 

Residents tJl Nanh Ciirolma and New Vork. add uppropnatc tax lor unir area (.anadun 
iirdcrs. add '^".. jfintd ;ind M-rvici.-.'t lax 

P\c:ise allow 4-(i weeks for delivery- Pro^sram avaiUble onjy un 5'.*-inch disks 



1990 Gazette Index 




Everything's included! 

Features, games, reviews, 
education/home applications, 
programming, bug-swatter, 
feedback, and columns! 

A superb interface includes pull-down menus, help 
screens, and keyboard, joystick, or mouse control. Fea- 
tures include super-fast searching and sorting capa- 
bilities. An options screen allows you to choose text 
colors, drive number, and input device. And there's full 
documentation on disk. ' 

Choose from three modes of operation — browse for quick 
scanning, view for detailed information and descriptions, 
and edit for adding items from upcoming issues — and 
print to any printer. There's even a turboload option for 
maximum disk-access speed. 



ORDER YOUR 
1990 GAZETTE 
INDEX TODAY! 

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on orders with subtotal over S20.) 



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How to Type In 
COMPUTE'S Gazette Programs 



Each month, Gazette publishes pro- 
grams for the Commodore 128 and 64. 
Each program is clearly marked by title 
and version. Be sure to type in the 
correct version for your machine. All 64 
programs run on the 128 in 64 mode. Be 
sure to read the instructions in the cor- 
responding article. This can save time 
and eliminate any questions which 
might arise after you begin typing. 

We regularly publish two pro- 
grams designed to make typing easier: 
The Automatic Proofreader, for BASIC 
programs, and MIX, for entering ma- 
chine language programs. 

When entering a BASIC program, 
be especially careful with DATA state- 
ments, as they are extremely sensitive 
to errors. A mistyped number in a 
DATA statement can cause your ma- 
chine to "lock up" (you'll have no con- 
trol over the computer). If this happens, 
the only recourse is to turn your com- 
puter off and then on, erasing what was 
in memory. This could cause you to lose 
valuable data, so be sure to save a pro- 
gram before you run it. If your computer 
crashes, you can always reload the pro- 
gram and look for the error. 



Special Characters 

Most of the programs listed in each 
issue contain special control characters. 
To facilitate typing in any programs 
from Gazette, use the following listing 
conventions. 

The most common type of control 
characters in our listings appear as 
words within braces: (DOWN) means 
to press the cursor-down key; {5 
SPACES} means to press the space bar 
five times. 

To indicate that a key should be 
shifted (hold down the Shift key while 
pressing another key), the character is 
underlined. For example, A means hold 
down the Shift key and press A. You 
may see strange characters on your 
screen, but that's to be expected. If you 
find a number followed by an under- 
lined key enclosed in braces (for ex- 
ample, {8 A}), type the key as many 
times as indicated (in our example, en- 
ter eight shifted A's). 

If a key is enclosed in special 
brackets, § |l hold down the Commo- 
dore key (at the lower left comer of the 
keyboard) and press the indicated 
character. 



Rarely, you'll see a single letter of 
the alphabet enclosed in braces. This 
can be entered on the Commodore 64 
by pressing the Ctrl key while typing 
the letter in braces. For example, {A} 
means to press Ctrl-A. 

The Quote Mode 

You can move the cursor around the 
screen with the Crsr keys, but you may 
want to move it under program control, 
as in examples like {LEFT} and 
{HOME} in the listings. The only way 
the computer can tell the difference be- 
tween direct and programmed cursor 
control is the quote mode. 

Once you press the quote key, 
you're in quote mode, which can be 
confusing if you mistype a character 
and cursor left to change it. You'll see a 
graphics symbol for cursor left. Use the 
delete key to back up and edit the line. 
Type another quotation mark to get out 
of quote mode. If things get too confus- 
ing, exit quote mode by pressing Re- 
turn; then cursor up to the mistyped 
line and fix it. If the nustake involves 
cursor movement, you must press the 
quote key to reenter quote mode. B 



WHen You Read: 

{CLR} 

{HOME} 

{UP} 

{DOWN} 

{LEFT} 

{RIGHT} 

{RVS} 

{OFF} 

(BLK} 

{WHT} 

{RED} 

{CYN} 



Press: 



SHIIT 


CLR/HOMH 


aR/HOMI 


SHIFT 


I CRSRl 



SHIFT 



t c«sR 1 ] m 

■i— CRSR--*! I:| 



-<— CRSR— <► 



CTRL 


5 


CTRL 






CTRL 


1 


CTRL 


2 


CTKl 


3 



CTRL 


4 



Wlieit You Read: 

{PUR} 
|GRN} 
{BLU} 

{YEL} 
{ Fl \ 
{ F2 } 
{ F3 [ 
{ H } 
{ F5 } 
{ F6 } 
{ F7 ) 
{ FB } 



Press: 




CTRL 


S 






CTRL 6 


CTRL 


7 




CTRL 


8 












fl 










SHIFT 


11 '■ 











SHIFT 


f3 






is 










SHIFT 


i5 






a i 










SHIFT 


f7 





See: 



When You Read: Press: 

[E 



SHIFT 



T] 



For Commodore 64 Only 



§13 

g73 
§83 



I COMMODORE 



COMMODORE 2 | 


COMMODORE 3 | 


COMMODORE 1 ^ 4 ' 


COMMODORE | 5 | 


COMMODORE | 6 


COMMODORE | 7 


COMMODORE [ 8 



■I 
□ 



G-40 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




REVIEWS 



BE A BETTER MANAGER • LEARN MORE ABOUT DOS 
PILOT THE ULTIMATE FIGHTING MACHINE 



nnBUcninTY 

THE MANAGER'S 
ORGANIZER 

If you manage people, there's finally 
a Personal Information Manager 
(PIM) for you. PIMs have been a 
hot item lately because they help or- 
ganize people, projects, and ideas in 
one convenient, free-form program. 
Because PIMs are so free-form, how- 
ever, unless youVe a computer wizard, 
you may have trouble harnessing their 
power. 

The Manager's Organizer from 
MECA is different. Managers don't 
need to be computer jockeys or orga- 
nizational geniuses to use this $ 199.95 
program. With TMO's fwt modules, 
you can organize time, calculations, 
personnel, travel expenses, and 
agreements. 

The Desk Menu is a comprehen- 
sive time organizer that lists daily ap- 
pointments, reminders, phone calls, 
and follow-ups in an easy-to-read re- 
port format. TMO lets you build a 
business-card file, telephone contacts 
with its auto-dialer, and write volumi- 
nous notes with its Spartan word pro- 
cessor. You can export files to ASCII, 
from which they can be imported to 
any word processor. TMO can't read 
or write directly to a WordPerfect file, 
an inconsiderate flaw. The card file al- 
lows you to print onto labels and pro- 
vides sorting. It won't import your 
current records or export them to a 
database, however. 

The Calculator can do some nifty 
numerical gymnastics. You can easily 
figure compound interest, loans and 
annuities, bond yields, yield versus in- 
terest, profits, cash How, buy/lease/ 



rent options, and loan amortization. I 
liked using the days-between-dates 
calculator to figure out when a project 
was due. The profit calculator finally 
ended my frustration of figuring out 
what to divide by what. 




With the Travel menu you can 
report expenses, trips, and auto mile- 
age. The Agreement menu lists com- 
pany contracts, such as insurance, 
rentals, leases, and maintenance, with 
such information as vendor, price, 
terms, date, and notes. While you can 
do this with a word processor, TMO's 
advantage is that it adds the figures 
for you and provides a total. This 
helps managers control budgets. 

While many PIMs offer the fea- 
tures mentioned so far, TMO shines 
when you explore its special tools for 
managers. 

The personnel menu keeps track 
of employees' days off, job descrip- 
tions, and office policies. For every 
manager who dreads giving per- 
formance reviews, TWO gives you the 
flexibility to become the perfect one- 
minute manager. You can catch peo- 
pie doing something right and note it 
in the file. When it is time to do the 
review, youMl have all the documenta- 
tion 10 perform an effective critique. 
TMO provides fields for the employ- 
ee's goals and accomplishments as 
well. 



The compensation menu helps 
managers determine raises. You list 
each employee's salary and bonus. 
You can change these figures quickly 
by either percentage or money. The 
program adds all employees' salaries 
so you can see how much the depart- 
ment is paid — an effective tool for 
budget planning. 

One wonders why TMO lacks a 
project manager. With the program's 
hefty $ 199.95 list price, this feature 
should've been included. 

TMO can be used as a stand- 
alone program or a TSR. However, it 
take a deadening 1 8 seconds to load as 
a TSR on a 386-class machine. 

The documentation is well orga- 
nized and easy to read, and it even in- 
cludes hints that can help any 
manager get more organized. 

DANIEL J ANAL 



IBM PC and compatibles, 51 2K, two disk 
drives; hard disk recommended — 
$199.95 

MECA SOFTWARE 
327 Riverside Ave. 
W^stportCT 06881 
(2CS) 222-9150 



icrografx's Designer version 3.0 
makes the most of the new 
Windows operating environ- 
ment and should be a signifi- 
cant contender in the high-end 
designware market that also includes 
Arts S: Letters Graphic Editor and 
Corel Draw. Much has been made of 
the relative merits of these packages, 
along with DrawPerfect, GEM Artline, 
and a handful of other products. Gen- 
erally, the argument boils down to 
what features are more important to 
the individual. 

Designer's installation is much 
more user-directed than most, paus- 
ing at each turn to ask whether certain 
features should be added and giving 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 113 




REVIEWS 



an estimate of the amount of disk 
space they will occupy — along with 
the amount of hard disk space 
remaining. 

Graphic artists who work with 
scanned art will enjoy Designer's 
autotrace feature. While Arts d Letters 
can only trace a single contour in a 
monochrome graphic and Corel 
Draw uses an external program to 
automatically trace an entire graphic. 
Designer combines these features. It 
will trace an imported file with gray 
scales or multiple colors, recognizing 
the contours automatically and color- 
ing the tracings to match the traced 
areas to which they correspond, right 
inside the main program. 

Designer isn't ver>' graceful when 
it uses all available memory in a too- 
complex autotrace. First a dialog box 
repeats several times, complaining 
that it has run out of memory, and 
then it continues to try to create the 
last trace until the user presses Esc. To 
Designer's credit, however, the pro- 



gram doesn*t crash, and you can back 
out of most actions with Esc. 

Despite the fact that I had 4205K 
available to me. Designer refused to 
print when the figure onscreen was 




Designer is a htgh-end drawing program 
that makes the most of Windows 3.0. 

highly complex. The solution offered 
by the technical support personnel 
was to make the trace less complex. I 
would suggest that future releases 
should make use of available memory 



for temporary storage of the graphic 
specifications. I like complex traces, 
and Td like to be able to print them 
out as v%'ell. 

The people at technical support 
are patient and knowledgeable (they 
knew I was a reviewer). Their hours 
are from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. CST, 
Monday through Friday. As a pur- 
chaser, you would be entitled to un- 
limited free technical support, but the 
registration card gives you the option 
of a year's "extended" technical sup- 
port. This actually means that, for 
$150, you will receive Designer up- 
grades for a year. 

Designer comes with a program 
called Telegrafx, which allows you to 
download your Designer charts and 
graphics to a slide service, which can ■ 
create physical manifestations of your 
graphics for sales presentations and 
other kinds of shows. This has be- 
come a standard feature of design 
software and is widely available. 

.AJ though Designer isn't equipped 




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REVIEWS 



to do *'tweening" (creating intermedi- 
ate shapes between two different 
drawings, as between a bat and a vam- 
pire) as Arts d Letters Graphic Editor 
is, it can make multiple copies of a 
single figure, distorting it and moving 
it a set amount for each copy. It sub- 
stitutes gradient fill for blending — a 
poor bargain, in my opinion. 

You can manipulate nodes 
(move control and set points for 
curves and lines in a drawing) through 
combinations of mouse buttons and 
the Ctrl, Alt, and Shift keys on the 
keyboard, which is harder to learn 
than the competing interfaces' styles. 
{Corel Draw uses a pop-up menu 
when you double-click on a point, and 
Arts d Letters uses selections from an 
existing toolbox and menu.) However, 
once you've learned Designer's node- 
manipulation technique, it's faster 
and less troublesome, representing a 
slight tradeoff of friendliness for 
efficiency. 

In all, Designer is a capable piece 



of software representing the slate of 
the art in many areas, but it distin- 
guishes itself in its autotrace capabili- 
ties. Its interface is slightly harder to 
learn but more efficiently laid out 
than that of the competition. 

ROBERT BIXBY 



IBM PC AT and compatibles or an 80386- 
based system; 1MB RAM; DOS 3.1 or 
higher with Windows; EGA, VGA, or 
8514/A graphics; 20MB hard disk; mouse 
or digitizing pad — $695 

MICROGRAFX 
1303 Arapaho 
Richardson. TX 75081 
(214)234-1769 



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Keep your financial goals in sight by 
plotting them on a time-line graph. 

money when the time comes. Wealth 
Starter is the personal financial plan- 
ning system designed to help an indi- 
vidual or family control spending 
habits and set such financial goals. In 
addition to its other capabilities, 
Wealth Starter makes financial pro- 
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help project what steps you should 




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REVIEWS 



take to achieve your goals; it even lets 
you see how you compare to the rest 
of the country. 

Wealth Starter basQs its financial 
model on the sound premise that you 
should have a cash reserve of three to 
six months' worth of expenses. From 
that, Wealth Starter enables you to set 
up a budget designed to help you 
reach your financial goals. After 
you've defined the parameters for 
yourself or your family (the program 
comes with several predefined goals 
■ such as debt reduction, retirement, 
education, and so on), Wealth Starter 
compiles four graphs (goals, monthly 
budget, projected cumulative budget, 
and net worth) and gives you such re- 
ports as a financial report card, budget 
tips, projected budget, and net worth. 

Wealth Starter even lets you 
easily see if your goals are attainable. 
To do this, simply change certain pa- 
rameters to view how these changes 
could affect your goals or your budget. 
If you use Quicken 3.0 or 4.0, you can 
import your budget data from Qiiick- 
en, saving yourself double entry every 
month. 

Here's one of the best features of 
the budget program: Wealth Starter 
will automatically reduce your liabil- 
ity amounts every month when you 
enter your payments. However, make 
sure you enter only the principal-and- 
interest part of the payment. Some 
monthly payments are loaded with 
things like taxes and credit Ufe and 
health insurance. This loan balance 
information is valuable — use it at the 
end of the year to compare notes with 
your lending institution to prevent 
costly miscalculation. 

There are some other nice loan- 
utility programs in Wealth Starter as 
well. The loan comparer is a good way 
to find the best loan when you shop 
for home mortgages. Wealth Starter 
will compare the variables from dif- 
ferent institutions to let you know 
which rate is the most economical. 
There is also a loan calculator^a 
must when you're shopping for an 
item hke a new car and are going to fi- 
nance the purchase. Make sure your 
numbers compare to the seller's; this 
is a sure way to find out if any un- 
wanted items like credit life or health 
insurance are added to your purchase 
price. There's even a loan-balance 
program to help you analyze hypo- 
thetical loans you may be considering. 



Wealth Starters only obvious 
disadvantage is its cumbersome sub- 
menus. They can be confusing, but 
with some practice you'll have no 
problem navigating through them. 
And don't forget the user's guide — it's 
less than 1 00 pages and should be read 
before beginning Wealth Starter. 

To get ahead financially, you 
should have a picture of where you're 
going and how you plan to get there. 
Wealth Starter can help provide you 
with the road map to your financial 
success. And while you're at it, you 
can even find out if planning a trip to 
Europe is in your future. 

PEER PLAUT 



IBM PC and compatibles. 51 2K RAM, 
hard disk— $59.99 

REALITY TECHNOlJOGiES 
3624 Market St. 
Philadelphia, mi 91 04 
(800)346-2024 



^Fhis product is a giant step toward 
I what a disk operating system 
I ought to be. On the surface, DR 
I DOS handles like any old DOS 

you're used to, but if you want more 

power, or more features, DR DOS 

provides options galore. 




DR DOS 5.0 features ViewMax, an 

attractive icon-based graphical 

user interface. 

The functional equivalent of MS- 
DOS 3.3, DR DOS lets you use all the 
normal DOS commands you'd expect 
without learning anything new. Or 
you can use command extensions like 
XDEL, which allows deletion of files 
in multiple subdirectories and remov- 
al of empty subdirectories, or XDIR, 
which adds a handful of options to the 
normal DIR command. 



DR DOS outshines the current 
competing DOS versions in its memo- 
ry-management abilities. It can install 
itself, device drivers, and certain ap- 
plications into unused areas of high 
memory. Imagine having nearly 600K 
of memory free for programs after 
DOS loads. 

Deciding how to set up your 
memory is made much easier by in- 
stallation and setup programs that 
write and modify your AUTOEXEC 
.BAT and CONHG.SYS files. Just 
answer questions about how you want 
your system set up, and the proper 
commands will be saved for you. 

This feature is perfect for those 
who dread tampering with AUTO- 
EXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS and is 
pleasantly palatable for untrusting 
souls like me who normally won't let 
any installation program near my sys- 
tem startup files. DR DOS is consid- 
erate, making its AUTOEXEC.BAT 
modifications in a restricted area so 
that your personal setup is never 
affected- 

DR DOS also improves on MS- 
DOS by providing online help for all 
external commands and by keeping a 
command history, so recently used 
commands can be repealed or edited 
and reused without retyping, A full- 
screen text editor, which replaces the 
difficull-lo-use EDLIN line editor, 
uses control commands similar to 
those of WordStar. 

DR DOS also includes a disk- 
cache program, a password command 
that allows you to password-protect 
files and subdirectories, and a file-link 
program that can be used in unattend- 
ed file transfers between computers. 

One really exciting feature of DR 
DOS is its ability to accept user input 
during execution of the CONFIG.SYS 
file. Just place a question mark before 
any normal CONFIG.SYS command, 
and on boot-up, DR DOS will ask you 
whether you want that command 
executed. 

For anyone who desperately 
wants a graphical user interface but 
has neither the megahertz nor the 
megabytes to support it, DR DOS 
provides ViewMAX, which allows 
you to use mouse clicks to launch ap- 
plications and handle some rudimen- 
tary file-management chores. For 
more complex operations, however, it 
requires you to drop out to a DOS 
command line. Despite these short- 



116 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



J. R. R, Tolkien's 



^^/M 




-"" *he Excitement and Wonder of Toiki 

"Interplay's newest role-player tackles "Resplendent graphics and loving 



die Earth! 



m fore prove tm 
>, Interplay ism 




the Tolkien trilogy with top-flight aUention to the Tolkien lore prove tlmtin M best 

graphics, sound and a new play system The Lord of the Rings, Interplay ismpf^ elements of 

that should make adventuring in Middle i m. jmr -^^^mh fnmfmst rnifi-niavinn 
Earth more realistic than ever before. " 

-Video Games & Computer Entertainment 

Interplay Productions presents the 

first role-playing computer game tndud ^ etm. tr* mn^ ^^i 

encompassing the epic fantasy world — -" Hror+nnai c 

ofJ.R.RJolkien^slVliddleEarth. ' ,^ v ?!^ 1 ?' 

Players jo urneji" " ^" 



litea Dy noDDiis, eives, awarves, \ 
rizards, falling in and out of the 
ilutches of wolves, wargs, trolls, or^^ 
nd ghosts, allthe while prote '*^ 
''^one true ring from fallin'^'^ 




^ forgdmm role-playing u^^ 
ring game to and graphic ; I^H 
rule them adventures, P i--^ 
all!" The Lord of the Rings, Vol I uses 

-Computer stunning full screen, top-down, 256 
Gaming World color VGA graphics, smooth four 

directional scrolling, digitized sound, an 
easy to use point-and-click Icon 
interface, and an off-line paragraph 
system to bring the depth of the true 
Tolkien experience to life via the 
. . computer. 

"The Tolkien estate finally made the right 

-" - 'e with Interplay!' "^ 




Interplay Productions 
^37WS. SusaDrSuite 100 

Santa Ana, CA 92704 Tt^^ ^ 

(714) 549-2411 . ^f/g 

theBings, %l, I, call 1'800'969-GAI\;^r Available on MS-DOS for $54.95. Amiga. coming sqo 

mratlqn of the Tolkien Estate and their put}lishers, George Allen <S Unwin (publishers) Ltd^>^ 

'' and the other characters from TheLor^hgtpt^&k are © George Men 4 Unwin Publish^ 

ierpiay Productions. M^jts reservS^g/l^gils a trademark^^icrosoft Corpon 

CirclelliS^r Service Number 136 



'pIotofTheLdnUim 
M'1966 1974^'] 





REVIEWS 



comings, ViewMAX, which resembles 
GEM (also a product from Digital Re- 
search), may be all the GUI a lot of 
computers and users need. 

The operating system comes 
packaged with a thorough manual of 
nearly 500 pages. In addition to the 
normal sections on DOS commands, 
there*s a range of information for all 
users including introductory material 
and glossaries for the uninitiated and 
chapters on memor\'-management 
theory and troubleshooting for old 
hands. 

Microsoft's impending MS-DOS 
5.0 is expected to have some of the 
same memory-management features 
as DR DOS 5.0. There's no need to 
wait. Digital Research has a good pro- 
gram here \\ilh a lot of extras that can 
help wring every drop of power out of 
your machine. 

TONY ROBERTS 



IBM PC and compatibles, 256K RAM- 
$199 

DIGITAL RESEARCH 
70 Garden Ct. 
Monterey, CA 93942 
408 647-6675 



Anyone considering a midlife ca- 
reer change might be interested in 
a product like Career Design, It 
contains 50 activity modules that 
encourage you to explore your feelings 
about work. Almost ever>' module 
contains an interactive exercise to 
help you gain a clearer picture of your 
career interests. 

Career Design teaches how to 
write seven types of resumes (includ- 
ing chronological, functional, portfo- 
lio, and curriculum vitae), organize 
research, prepare proposals, and make 
presentations. And it provides tips on 
proper conduct during interviews, im- 
portant interview questions to consid- 
er, and how to negotiate a more 
favorable contract. 

Career Design is easy to use. It 
features a tutorial help screens, and 
prompts that eliminate the need for 
memorizing tedious keyboard com- 
mands. Its mandator>' password pro- 
tection keeps your personal informa- 
tion confidential. 

You can explore the Career De- 



sign modules in any order, but the 
publisher recommends an exploration 
sequence in its printed Flowchart of 
Modules, 




Put designs on your future. 

If you follow the recommended 
sequence. Career Design begins by fo- 
cusing on your interests, skills, likes, 
and dislikes. The objective is to give 
you a clear idea of what you do well 
and what you enjoy doing before you 
hunt for a job. 

The files you type with the built- 
in word processor (your interests, 
goals, letters, and work preferences) 
are made more accessible through the 
use of markers in the text that let you 
return to them instantly. 

The manual provides detailed 
program instructions plus a general- 
reference resource guide. You'll find 
information about business organiza- 
tions and directories, U.S. nonprofit 
organizations, corporate news, how to 
locale the best places in the country to 
live, and much more. Career Design 
also includes a wall-size plan-of-action 
chart on which you can jot down sum- 
maries of your goals, interests, and 
preferences for work conditions so 
they'll be visible when you're talking 
to prospective employers on the 
phone. 

Career Design offers practical ad- 
vice for anyone interested in planning 
and implementing a successful career 
strategy. However, many individuals 
in search of new and exciting employ- 
ment could probably do just as well 
by consulting career-planning guide 
books. The software doesn't use your 
answers to suggest possible job op- 
tions. It merely poses questions that 
help you uncover your interests and 
abilities. All interpretation is left up to 
you. 

One advantage Career Design has 
over conventional career-planning 




Just a fraction of what we spend dining out 
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Whatyhii^ back is immeasurable. 



textbooks is that your personal data 
files are always instantly available. 
You can use the word processor to 
copy information from the modules 
to the letters that you write. This fea- 
ture is a valuable timesaver if you 
plan to write letters with boilerplate 
text. In addition, data files are always 
instantly available. You can call them 
up with a few simple keystrokes if you 
need to complete a job application or 
access personal information during a 
phone conversation with a potential 
employer. 

The product is worth its $99 price 
tag if you're the kind of person who 
prefers computers to pens. If you al- 
ready have a word processor, you 
might learn as much by visiting the lo- 
cal library. However, the open-ended 
format may be freeing to some, and 
may lead to personal insights. 

CAROL S. HOLZBERG 



fBM PC and compatibles, 525K RAM. 
DOS 2.0 or higher, 2.7MB of hard disk 
space— $99.00 (plus $6.95 shipping and 
handling) 

CAREER DESIGN SOFTWARE 
P.O. Box 95624 
Atlanta. GA 30347 
(800)346-8007 



118 



COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



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Expiration date. 



,Signature_ 



Amount 

Sales Tax* 

Add $3.00 shipping and handling 

for each cassette ordered 

Total 



D Check □ Money Order 

Send your order to: 

Compute Entertainment Software Showcase 

PO- Box 68666 

Indianapolis, IN 46268 



0591 



•Residents of New York, Connecticut and North Carolina add appropriate sales tax for your state. Canadian orders, add 7% goods and services tax. All 
orders must be paid in U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. tJank MasterCard or Visa Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. Offer expires April 30, 1991 . 




REVIEWS 



1AKIN' CARE Of 




anaging a business is tough, 
and half the battle is keeping re- 
cords. Takin ' Care of Business 
may be the answer. It's an inte- 
grated accounting package designed to 
help small- to medium-sized business- 
es manage their financial information. 
The package comes with six modules: 
General Ledger, Accounts Receivable, 
Accounts Payable, Account Reconcili- 
ation, Payroll, and Financial Utilities. 
Two additional modules — Inventory 
and Point of Sale/Invoicing — should 
be available by the time you read this. 
The program comes with a separate 
manual for each of the modules, as 
well as an introductory manual called 
Gelling Started. 

Installing the program's eight 5'/4- 
inch floppies onto a hard drive is easy 
with the included Install program. 
Once up and running, the program 
can be configured with your prefer- 
ences for screen colors, printing op- 
lions, menu types, sound, and so on. 
You can also specify two levels of 
passwords for each of the modules. A 
first-level password allows access to 
all functions of a module except view- 
ing or printing reports, while a second- 
level password allows unrestricted 
access to all functions. The configura- 
tion menu also includes a data-file 
backup utility. For large files, how- 
ever, you're probably belter off using 
a backup utility that also compresses 
the files. 

Although Takin * Care of Business 
is designed for use by nonaccountants, 
a knowledge of basic accounting prin- 
ciples will help you to understand 
how ihe program works. The General 
Ledger module, for example, is a 
double-entry bookkeeping system in 
which debits must equal credits and 
assets are the sum of your liabilities 
and equity. These accounting princi- 
ples are described briefly in the User's 
Manual, but it's also recommended 
that you consult an accounting or 
bookkeeping text for a more detailed 
explanation. Fortunately, the program 
comes with several sample files and 
sample accounts already created so 
you can experiment with various 
types of transactions to see how they 



affect both sides of the ledger. 

Up to 2000 accounts can be 
maintained in the General Ledger, 
and the number of transactions you 
may enter in any given year is limited 
only by your disk space. Recurring 
transactions can be specified as 
monthly, semimonthly, biweekly and 
weekly. A wide variety of financial re- 
ports can be generated and output to 
the screen, printer, or disk. Account 
balances can be compared using pie, 
bar, or line graphs. 

The Accounts Receivable module 
lets you keep track of up to 2000 cus- 
tomers. Using this module, you can 
produce invoices and easily generate 
receivable aging reports that will list 
those customers with delinquent bills. 
The program will even print the ad- 
dress labels so you can send reminders 
to those with accounts past due. 

On the other side of the coin, the 
.Accounts Payable module will help 
you keep track of your vendor pay- 
ables to ensure that your company's 
bills get paid on lime. Again, this 
module is feature-packed, allowing an 
unlimited number of transactions, 
computer generation of either contin- 
uous- or laser-form checks, and sever- 
al types of reports, Takin ' Care of 
Business doesn't allow you to design 
report formats from scratch, but the 
existing formats are all thoughtfully 
designed and quite useful without 
modification. 

The Payroll module can help you 
keep the paychecks rolling out for up 
to 1000 employees. The module in- 
cludes income tax tables from most 
states and allows automatic lax de- 
ductions of both federal and state tax- 
es. It also lets you easily track 
vacation, sick time, overtime, holi- 
days, and two overtime categories for 
all of your employees. Again, mailing 
labels, and several types of reports (in- 
cluding W-2 and 1099 forms) can be 
generated from within this module. 

It should be emphasized here that 
the Accounts Receivable, Accounts 
Payable, and Payroll modules are all 
fully integrated with the General Led- 
ger so that transactions entered in any 
one module are automatically record- 
ed where appropriate in others. The 
other modules — Financial Utilities 
and Account Reconciliation — aren't 
integrated in this same way, but both 
are easily accessible from the other 
modules. 



The Financial Utilities module 
lets you analyze loans, investments 
such as annuities, and various types of 
depreciation (straight 4ine, declining 
balance, and so on), while the Ac- 
count Reconciliation module serves 
to automate the balancing of your 
checkbook and helps you to monitor 
the balances of your credit cards. This 
module seems superfluous in a busi- 
ness package, and other programs 
such as Money'Counts by Parson's 
Technology are better at handling per- 
sonal finances. 

Nevertheless, Takin ' Care of 
Business is a reasonable accounting 
solution for any small business with a 
growing amount of financial data to 
get under control. Seeing all that Ta- 
kin ' Care of Business can do will make 
you wonder how any small company 
can gel offihe ground without such a 
program. 

BOB Gf ERR A 



ISM PC, KT, AT, PS/2 or compatible with 
hard disk; MS-DOS 2.0 or higher; 51 2K 
RAM^$299.60 

IHooper international 
P.O. Box 50200 
Colorado Springs, CO 80949 
(719)528-8989 



Today's PCs have more memory 
than ever, but today's programs 
demand more memory, too. Blue- 
MAX, from Qualitas, helps IBM 
PS/2s with an 80386SX, 80386, or 
80486 processor get the most out of 
their available memor>' by moving 
memory-resident programs and de- 
vice drivers into an area above the 
first 640K. 




BtueMAX iets you use more of 
your PS/2'5 memory. 



120 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



END BMDNESS AND THINNING HAIR 




^f^^ 





"10 EVERY MAN LOSING HAIR" 

In announcing Hair Dynasty, I said: 

"1 will offer every individual the ultimate in 
hair replacement! It shall be constructed of 
the finest nnaterial and developed from only 
the latest, most modern technology! The 
result shall be a hair-replacement system 
that is permanent and totally undetectable 
to those around you— regardless of the 
circumstances! No man has to aooept 
being bald anymore T 
Daniel R. Trimper, President of Hair 
Dynasty For Men 




IMPROVE YOUR 
APPEARANCE 

Right now you could 
dramatically improve your 
appearance and look 
years younger without the 
use of dangerous drugs, 
painful surgery, or unsightly 
hairpieces. Whether you 
want complete or partial 
coverage— or you just wish 
to add volume, thickness, 
or length to your existing 
hair — Hair Dynasty has the 
solution for you. Only Hair 
Dynasty offers you the very 
latest, state-of-the-art hair- 
addition methods that are 
designed specifically with 
your lifestyle and personal 
needs in mind. 

GET RID OF YOUR 
HAIR PROBUM FOR 
GOOD 

If you are beginning to 
lose hair or already have a 
bald spot — Ha/r Dynasty 
has the solution! You will 
always feel comfortable 
whether you're swimming, 
jogging, skiing, or even 
closing that big deal. And 
when you're sharing your 
most intimate moments 
with your loved one or 
you're surrounded by 
thousands of people, only 
you will know you owe your 
self-confidence and great 
appearance to Hair 
Dynasty. But don't take my 
word for it. . . . 

YOU RISK NOIHING! 

At Hair Dynasty, See 
Yourself With Hair Again! 



Using only the latest 
technology— with our 
Computer Imaging 
Machine, you can: 

* Design your own hair- 
replacement system! 

'You select the hair length, 
hairstyle, and hair color! 
*See how you will took before 
you buy! 

* Select from hundreds of 
hairstyles! 

•See yourself with new hair 

again! 

•There is no cost or obligation! 

SEE YOURSELF WITH 
HAIR AGAIN ON 
OUR COMPUTER! 




Actual Computer tmaging Sessfon 



Choose how you want to 
look! We'll take your 
picture and then design a 
hair-replacement system 
on your image. You 
choose and design your 
hair line, hairstyle, and hair 
length. We will then give 
you a color picture of the 
new you! 

This is a major break- 
through! 

You no longer have to 
wonder what you will 
iook like with new hair 
again! You choose how 
you want to iook! 



MY LOSS IS YOUR 
GAIN! 

Hair Dynasty was created 
by an individual tike 
yourself v^ho used to have 
a hair-loss problem. Look 
at these unretouched 
photographs carefully, 
then ask yourself, Does 
that hair have the kind of 
shine, the kind of 
thickness, the kind of life 
and vitality you'd like your 
own hair to have today- 
no matter what your age? 
It can — since Hair Dynasty 
offers you a solution we 
can both be proud of! 

IT COULD CHANGE 
YOURUFE! 

You'll get results from Hair 
Dynasty without drugs, 
painful surgery, or un- 



sightly hairpieces. Our new 
hair-replacement tech- 
nique looks completely 
natural, is permanent, and 
uses 100 percent real 
human hair. There is no 
limitation to your lifestyle. 
Wash it, style it, comb it — 
it's your hair! Discover how 
great you can took again— 
without any risk! 

FREEINFORJVUmON! 

Call now and receive — 
FREE—\he latest facts 
about hair loss and Hair 
Dynasty's new and unique 
hair-replacement system. 
You'll learn about Hair 
Dynasty's new computer- 
imaging system— what it 
means to you— and 
discover how many of our 
members look, both before 
and after! 



There is no obligation! Call toll free: 

1-800-424-HAIR 



Or simply cut out and mail in the coupon below. 



2 4 7 



Mail to: 

Hair Dynasty For Men 
Route 17 Nortii, Suite #215 
ParamuSj NJ 07652 

YES: Rush me your free information on hair loss and your 
new and unique hair-replacement system, I understand that 
there is no cost or obligation. 



Name:, 



Address: 

City: 

Zip: 



State;. 

.Phone:( ) 



j^ir Dynasty for Men ® 



Franchises available - Great Opportunity - For information please cali (201) 712-0777. 




REVIEWS 



An Install routine automatically 
installs the BlueMAX driver and con- 
figures BlueMAX to your system. 
Maximize then optimally configures 
available memor>'. On PS/2 systems, 
you can see gains of 80K or more. The 
result: more memor>' and faster sys- 
tem performance. 

BlueMAX worked with a variety 
of applications on a PS/2 Model 70, 
although the manual warns of poten- 
tial problems with programs using 
ROM BASIC or undocumented PS/2 
features. The program supports LIM 
4.0, EMS, XMS 3.0, VDS 1.0, and 
VCPI- and XMS-compatible protecied- 
mode programs. 

The program's documentation is 
comprehensive, and its operation is 
simplicity itself Reconfiguring for 
new TSRs is easy, too. This is one 
memory manager you'll actually use. 

STEVE HLfDSON 



IBM PS/2; 80386SX, 80386 or 80486 pro- 
cessor; 256K of extended RAM— SI 55 

QUALiTAS 

7101 Wisconsin Ave., Ste, 1386 

Bethesda.MD 20814 

(301)907-6700 



LEGACY 



Times have changed. It used to be 
that if you wanted word process- 
ing, page layout, and graphics, you 
needed three separate programs. 
Today, however, more and more 
products are combining all three func- 
tions. Legacy, a new entr\' in this 
everything-you-ever-wanted-in-a- 
word-processor categor>v runs under 
Windows 3.0 and brims with tools de- 
signed to make going from initial idea 
to finished document easy. 

The nicest part of this software 
combination is having word process- 
ing features online during page layout. 
Search and replace, a spelHng checker, 
and a thesaurus can really help get 
your document in shape before 
printing. 

Legacy also boasts a table gener- 
ator, which simplifies setting up and 
formatting tables and grids; mail 
merge; and Dynamic Data Ex- 
change, which, for example, allows 
you to link a spreadsheet with a Leg- 
acy document so changes made in 
the spreadsheet will be automatically 



reflected in the Legacy file. 

The program's toolbox is jam- 
packed. Sadly though, some of the 
tools and the box itself appear to have 
been bent in order to make everything 
fit. The result is less than optimum 
performance. 

To run Legacy, you need at least 
a 286 system with'640K RAM and 
Windows 3.0. Legacy's main program 
file is L3 megabytes large. With only 
640K of R.4M available, there's going 
to be a lot of disk swapping going on. 
Even with 3 megabytes of RAM on a 
386SX, Legacy's menus and screen re- 
drawing are sluggish. 

Legacy is a frame-based system. 
You build your documents by placing 
frames on pages and filling the frames 
with text, graphics, or art. You create 
various styles for the text elements to 
define such things as fonts, sizes, posi- 
tioning, and margins. Similarly, you 
Creole properties to manage the attri- 
butes of the various frames. 

This program may be at its best 
when it's used to create and fill preset 
templates and generate fast, sharp out- 
put. Setting up templates for com- 
monly used documents — ^letters, 
office memos, meeting agendas — as- 
sures quick, consistent resuhs. For ex- 
ample, to type a letter, call up the 
letter template. Select the date style 
and type in the date. The date style in- 
cludes positioning information so the 
date will be properly positioned below 
your letterhead. 

Continue typing the letter, select- 
ing various styles for such things as 
the recipient's address, salutation, 
body text, and closing. When you 
reach the letter's end, formatting is 
done. All that's left is to check the 
spelling and print. 

Legacy provides several tem- 
plates that can be used as is or modi- 
fied. These include forms for letters, 
envelopes, memos, agendas, propos- 
als, reports, press releases, projection 
overheads, and newsletters. 

It's true that Legacy has much to 
offer, but it demands much of the ma- 
chine and its operator. Even with a 
fast computer and plenty of memory, 
the going can be slow. When working 
with large amounts of text, it may be 
more expedient to enter the material 
into another word processing program 
and import the result into Legacy 
which includes import filters for most 
major word processing programs. 



Also, Legacy's spelling checker, 
while fine for checking a relatively 
clean document, leaves something to 
be desired for massive cleanup projects. 

In one of my projects, I mis- 
spelled the word scared by typing an x 
rather than a c. Legacy's spelling 
checker dutifully stopped when it 
found sxared, but the replacement 
words it suggested left me cold. The 
top three replacement options were 
sexier, sudsier, and saxifrage. 

Desktop publishers considering 
Legacy will want to note that the pro- 
gram has no apparent provision for 
distinguishing between opening and 
closing quotation marks. The docu- 
mentation does not mention quota- 
tion marks, but the manuals exhibit 
the shortcoming by using inelegant 
inch marks throughout. 

Legacy's documentation does a 
thorough job of guiding you through 
the program, and it's usually easy to 
locate needed information. The pro- 
gram's online tutorial is topnotch. 
The tutorial consists of 29 lessons on 
various aspects of the program. The 
lessons, which take from 5 to 1 5 min- 
utes to complete, can be used in any 
order at any time. 

These tutorials explain the mate- 
rial, then guide you through the menu 
selections needed to achieve the de- 
sired results. If you work through 
these lessons, you'll have a good basic 
understanding of Legacy, 

But be forewarned: This program 
is complex, and with so many possi- 
bilities, it'll take time to master. 



TONY ROBERTS 



IBM and compatible 286- or 386-based 
ATs; 640K RAM {1-2MB recommended); 
DOS 3.2 or higher; Windows 3.0; hard 
disk; EGA, VGA, or Hercules graphics; 
mouse— $495 

NBI 

P.O. Box 9001 

Boulder, CO 80301 

(303)444-5710 



EGLIN CONNECT 

^Fhe new telecommunications soft- 
I ware from Eclin Technologies, 
I Eciin Connect, offers an intuitive 
I point-and-shoot user interface 
with full mouse support, plus compre- 
hensive online help and an intelligent 
phone book that keeps usage records 



122 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



^^\ GOLF, AIR COMBAT, 

OR ADVENTURE 






BOOK Of 



CQnnpuTE 

HAS THE 

OFFICIAL GUIDE 



\mm 



F.15 STRIKE EA(iL|l 



lis tK ^\. =- 



The Official Guide to 

Jack Nicklaus Computer Golf 

by Mike Harrison 

Foreword by Jack NIcktaus 

SI 2.95 224 pages 

Here's the inside story. Learn how pro- 
fessional course designers decide where to 
put bunkers, trees, and greens. Also in- 
cludes tips for all the Jack Nicklaus golf 
games, including /ad' Nicklaus' Unlimited 
Golf & Course Design, This is the only au- 
thorized guide to all the Jack Nicklaus 
computer simulations from Accolade. 

The Official Book 
of Ultima 

by Shay Addams 

Introduction by Lord British 

$14.95 244 pages 

Written with the assistance of Lord British, 
Ultima's creator, this official guide includes 
inside information found nowhere else. 
Packed full of hints, tips, anecdotes, and 
never-before-published ciues for all six 
Ultima adventures. 



The Official F-15 
Strike Eagle Handbook 

by Richard Sheffield 

Foreword by Sid Meier 

$12,95 224 pages 

This is the official guide to MicroProse's 
best-selling F-15 simulators. Covers both 
F-15 Strike Eagle and F-15 Strike Eagle II. 
Filled with step-by-step instructions and 
clear diagrams. 



Other official guides from COMPUTE 

. The Official F-19 Stealth Fighter 
Handbook 

• The Official Book of King's Quest 

• The Official Book of 
Leisure Suit Larry 



Yes! 



1 want the official guides checked below. 



D T^e Official Guide to Jack Kidtlaut 

Computer GoJ( {23e-2) $12,95 

□ Tlie Official Baok of Ultima {22a>1) $14.95 

a The Official F*15 Strike EagSe Handbook (23M ) $1 Z.95 

D The Official F-19 Stealth Fighter Handbook (217-6) S14.S5 
n The Official Book of King't Quesl, 2nd Ed. 

Covers KQI-V (245-1) $12.95 

a The Official Boole of Leisure Suit latrf (215-X} $12.9S 

Subtotal 

S«(»s tan (Resident* ot NC, NY, & NJ add appropriate 

tale ft tax. CanadUin (Kd«ft add 7% goods and 

aervic«a tax.) 
Shipping and HandliftQ: t2 per book US; S4 Canada; 

S6 foreign 

, Totat Encloaad 



D Check or money order 
Signature . 



a MC n VISA 



Acct ro. . 



. Exp. Date . 



Street Address _ 

Crty 



. State- 



, ZIP. 



Ai D'd^rs nuEt be paid in U.S. fu.'>t:s drawn; on a U.S 5an)L OrdefS wul se 
St ^oed vj UPS Gfouid Servics Ofiw gooC w<ite suppites Ust 

Mail to Compute Books 
do CCC 

2500 McClellan Ave. 
Penns«uken, NJ 0fi1Q9 



MAY91CI 




REVIEWS 



for each number. Another usage re- 
cord tracks calls and downloads (in- 
cluding drive, direct orv\ and file- 
name), and it provides a 32-character 
comment field. The program can up- 
or download in the background — and 
uses only 60K to do it. Script files, 
which store predetermined command 
sets and play them back on command, 
simplify repetitive tasks such as log- 
ging off commonly used boards. Other 
features, such as user-programmable 
wait-to-connecl and wait-to-redial 
allow easy customization. There's 
even a built-in text editor. These fea- 
tures, combined with Edin Connect 's 
solid documentation and unlimited 
technical support, make it one to 
consider. 

STEVE HUDSON- 



IBM PC and compatibles, 384K RAM, 
Hayes or compatible modem; Microsoft 
or compatibie mouse recommended— 
$49 

ECLINTECHNOLJOGY 
1 72 W. State St 
P.O. Box 2014 
Trenton, NJ 08607 
(609) 393-0577 



CR0SS1MK 




A modem can be a lifeline. It links 
your PC to the outside world and 
lets you send and receive infor- 
mation, scan bulletin boards, and 
tap into time- and money-saving ser- 
vices where you do ever%lhing from 
researching the latest in panda metab- 
olism to lining up an airline ticket. 
Standing between you and these excit- 
ing services, however, is communica- 
tions software. Communications 
software tends to fall into two groups: 
programs that are easy to use and pro- 
grams with a lot of features that are 
hard to use. 

Crosstalk Communicator trie^ to 
be a happy medium. If s packed with 
enough features to handle a wide vari- 
ety of telecommunications situations, 
necessarily making it somewhat com- 
plex; yet it's relatively easy to use. En- 
tries are already programmed for 
popular services like CompuServe 
and the Official .4irline Guide, and a 
feature dubbed EASYC^LL makes 



creating new entries for communica- 
tion with bulletin boards or other 
computer systems a snap. Crosstalk 
Communicator asks a few simple 
questions to set up an entry and then 
dials automatically, if you want it to. 

Making adjustments to Crosstalk 
Communicator's standard settings re- 
quires a bit more effort. Each entry 
hides a multilevel maze of options, al- 
lowing you to choose between several 
terminal emulations, XMODEM 
variants, and specific utilities. After 
initial setup, however, it's no problem 
to call a computer or system and in- 
teract, rd like to see a more detailed 
menu after connection has been estab- 
lished, but once I got used to the sys- 
tem, I was able to work fairly quickly, 
executing commands and up- and 
downloading files online. 

The program comes with a help- 
ful reference card and a nicely de- 
tailed, thoroughly indexed user's 
guide. Its onscreen help system can be 
confusing at first, although with re- 
peated use it proved perfectly 
adequate. 

Crosstalk Communicator may 
provide more options and features 
than a casual telecommunicator 
needs, but it's basically easy to use, 
and it's a very powerful tool. 

EDDIE HUFFMAN 



IBM PC. PS/2, and compatibles: 5t2K: 
hard disk or two floppy drives: modem 
(more ttian 50 brands supported) or direct 
computer connection^$99 

DCA 

lOOOAfdermanDr. 
Alpharetta.GA 30202-4199 
(404)442-4000 




I had just mailed a column to my 
editor when the delivery man 
brought Monologue 2.0, a program 
that reads aloud any DOS text files 
including files created with word pro- 
cessors, databases, spreadsheets, as 
well as electronic mail. Even though I 
had run the column through Word- 
Perfect's spelling checker, I was sur- 
prised to discover two missing words I 
hadn*t noticed on paper. The voice 
sounded realistic and pleasant. You 
can change its volume, pitch, speed, 
and gender. The program uses your 
computers internal speaker and sup- 



■^-■■,v' ■■■■■■"■' , 1 




H^^ 


J* 






fA'M,fateMMl!l>lli 





Configure Mono/ogue to sutt you. 

ports hardware sound accessories for 
better tones. People with limited eye- 
sight can obviously benefit from a 
product like this, but Monologue will 
help any writer identify writing that 
* 'reads" poorly, though it looks per- 
fectly acceptable on the page, 

SCOTT DANIELS 



IBM PC and compatibles; 51 2K free 
RAM; supports EMS and XMS memory, 
Sound Blaster sound card, and the Hear- 
say 1000, Covox Speech Thing, and Echo 
PC + text-to-speech adapters; mouse 
and hard disk recommended — $1 49 

FIRST BYTE 
P.O. Box 2961 
Torrance. CA 90509 
(800)556-6141 



lABElPRO 



If you're running a small business 
from your home, Label Pro will give 
a sharp look to your mass mailings. 
In both its dot-matrix and laser ver- 
sions, this program handles not only 
mailing labels but also shipping labels, 
disk and file-folder labels, and a vari- 
ety of specially labels. Label Pro lets 
you specify label size and format and 
gives you control o%^er the type size 
and typefaces you use on your labels. 

LabelPro will use address data 
stored in dBASE and WordPerfect for- 
mats, as well as in Avery's own List- 
dMailsLud ListdM ail Plus formats. It 
can also handle comma-delimited 
.A.SCII files. If you're mailing from rel- 
atively small lists, you can create a 
database using LabelPro itself Indi- 
vidual LabelPro databases are limited 
to 300 records per file, but there's no 
limit to the number of files you can 
create. Limited search and sort op- 
tions are available, but there's no 



124 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




REVIEWS 



automatic word-wrapping. That 
means that records can be truncated if 
they are too long for your specified 
format. Fortunately, the program can 
alert you to truncated records, 

A home business thai wants the 
look of custom labels for short mail 
runs will fmd LabelPro a real help. 

STEVE HUDSON 



IBM PC and compatibles. 51 2K RAM, 
hard disk; dot-matrix version requires 
graphics-capable printer; laser version 
supports LaserJet- and PostScript-com- 
patible printers— $99.95 

AVERY COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS 

DtVISION 

P.O. Box 61002 

Pasadena, CA 91 116-7002 

(800} 748-5657 

(818)792-2102 



SniLAR 7 



The word stellar refers to some- 
thing outstanding. In this sense, 
Stellar 7 is aptly named. This 
futuristic combat game from Dyn- 
amix features amazing action punctu- 
ated by enemy fire, eye-catching 256- 
color VGA graphics, and digital 
sound. Stellar 7 almost feels like a 
game from the future. 

Although the action is definitely 
arcade, Stellar 7 has three-dimensional 
graphics that closely resemble those of 
the best flight and tank simulators. 
Looking out from the cockpit of your 
vehicle, you steer through fast arcade 
action that's set in the midst of excel- 
lent and realistic-feeling graphics. It's 
like a Star Wars battle on land with 
high-tech tanks. 

The story is a classic plot from 
the pages of arcade literature (what an 
oxymoron!). It seems that some Darth 
Vader-esque character with a bad atti- 
tude and a voice like Arnold Schwart- 
zenegger wants to take over the Earth. 
You are, of course, Earth's only hope 
and must fight off the invading forces 
(sound familiar?). 

Your weapon is the Raven, 
which the documentation refers to as 



''the ultimate fighting machine." It's a 
futuristic tank with an antigravity 
(agrav) generator that lets it hover two 
feet above any surface. The Raven's 
weapons include high-tech shields, 
cannons, radars, a cloaking device, 
and special thmsters. 





Stellar 7 features eye-catching VGA 
graphics and fast arcade action. 

You pilot your high-tech tank in 
any direction through a beehive of en- 
emy vehicles and fire. Your tank has 
fixed turrets, so you must turn your 
entire vehicle to shoot at the enemy 
while avoiding its fire. 

Unlike incompetent storm troop- 
ers who can't hit the side of a cargo 
ship, your enemy is dangerous, intelli- 
gent, and deadly. You have to move 
fast in order to shoot down the enemy 
planes, artillery, and tanks before they 
shoot you. Each time your tank takes 
a hit, you lose energy. When your 
power is gone, your shields drop. One 
more hit at this point, and the game 
is over. 

The graphics exploit the 256- 
color VGA palette to the hilt. While 
the VGA graphics are incredible, the 
EGA graphics are still nice, and the 
CGA graphics are OK. The game is 
harder to play in EGA (even harder in 
CGA) because the objects on the radar 
are harder to differentiate. 

The graphics are so well done 
that Dynamix features an actual 
screen shot on the package. How 
many times have you seen a game 
that even remotely resembles the pic- 
ture on the box? Stellar 7 doesn't let 
you down. Some of the screens were 
originally airbrushed and then digi- 
tized to produce graphics with a dis- 
tinctive look. 

If you have a sound board, you'll 
hear first-rate sound effects and a re- 
lentless, but rousing, musical score. 
You'll also hear the characters' voices 
during the interludes. It's easy to get 



caught up in the action when you crank 
up the stereo sound. My insomnia- 
ridden neighbors probably heard me 
playing into the wee hours of the 
morning. The game is so addictive 
that I actually lost sleep playing it. 

The documentation is brief and 
clearly written. The game is easy to in- 
stall and a snap to learn — but with 
seven levels, it's a definite challenge. 
Overall, i preferred the joystick, but 
for certain shots that needed consis- 
tent accuracy, I preferred the 
keyboard. 

If you want a break from com- 
puter games that bend your mind with 
puzzles or make you explore and map 
vast computer-generated worlds, treat 
yourself to Stellar 7. It's an excellent 
shoot-'em-up arcade game with rivet- 
ing action and incredible graphics. 

WWNE N. KAWAMOTO 



IBM PC and compatibles; CGA, EGA, 
VGA, or Tandy 1 6-color graphics adapter; 
joystick recommended; sound effects and 
musical support for Roland MT-32, 
LAPC-1, Ad Lib, and Sound Blaster 
sound cards; digital voice support for 
Tandy 1000TL, Tandy SL, and Sound 
Blaster; mouse optional — $34.95 

UfHAmX 

99W.10th,Ste.337 
Eugene, OR 97401 
{503)343-0772 




THE CHALLENGE 
OF GOLF 

Golf is a passion. To indulge in 
their favorite pastime, golfers en- 
dure rain, cold, even snow (using 
colored balls). You just can't 
keep avid golfers away from their 
game. When you can't play the real 
thing, a few rounds on the PC can 
calm the fever. Computer golf games 
are wildly popular; neariy every major 
game developer has one. 

Access Software has taken com- 
puter golf a giant step forward with 
Links, a VGA-only, three-dimension- 
al visual extravaganza that's the most 
fun and most realistic golf program 
I've tried. 

Step onto the South Course at 
California's Torrey Pines, set atop pic- 



M A Y 19 9 1 



COMPUTE 125 




REVIEWS 



turesque cliffs along the Pacific 
Ocean. At the first tee, your digitized 
golfer stands at the ready as you look 
over the fairway. The screens are digi- 
tized photos of Torrey Pines, showing 
contours, trees, golf cart paths, cliffs, 
ocean, background skyline, the club- 
house, and everything else you see on 
the actual course. 




Links features VGA graphics. 

As you admire the view, you may 

be surprised to hear birds singing — 
even through your plain-vanilla inter- 
nal PC speaker. If you've played Ac- 
cess's earlier golf game ( World Class 
Leader Board, also a standout game), 
you know about RealSound, Access 
Software's seemingly magical system 
that produces realistic sound without 
an add-on sound board. As you play 
your round, be ready for your com- 
panions to pipe up with such com- 
ments as '^That'll play," '*Nice par," 
or "1 seem to have hit the tree, Jim.'* 

You tee off using your mouse 
(there are keyboard alternatives, but a 
mouse is best). With fluid motion and 
true-to-life sound, the golfer hits the 
ball The ball's flight is smooth and 
beautiful (unless you've hooked or 
sliced it), with its shadow following 
along the ground. The ball lands on 
the turf, bounces, and rolls in a way 
that's appropriate to the terrain. 

As the ball rolls dead, a control 
panel pops up, offering instant replays 
of the shot, either from the tee or a 
reverse angle (a TV-like view that 
shows the ball coming toward you). 
You can see exactly what happens to 
your ball, including such interesting 
possibilities as seeing your ball roil 
down a long, steep hill to the cliff tops. 

The control panel shows the dis- 
tance of the shot, including the 
amount of ground roll, and offers two 
choices: Continue to the next shot or 
take a Mulligan. If you want to break 



par consistently (if unfairly), hit the 
Mulligan button after every bad shot. 
It discards the stroke and lets you re- 
play it. 

Links is unequalled in its visual 
artistry. But its mouse-based system 
of control over the swing and aim of 
each shot makes the play just as pleas- 
ant. You can enjoy the game without 
ever fussing with the finer points of 
golf Or, by clicking on the setup but- 
ton, you can fine-tune the stance, ball 
placement, angle of the club face, and 
plane of the swing. Using these con- 
trols, you can design and execute an 
exquisite golf shot, one that quickly 
rises to clear a close tree and fades to 
the right to follow the curve of the 
fairway, for example. 

Chip shots are a big part of the 
game. Links handles chip shots realis- 
tically by showing you the contours of 
the green so that you can place your 
shot just right. Club selection works 
properly, too. A 5-iron hit softly will 
run up the green, while a wedge shot 
landing in the same spot dies almost 
immediately. Chipping at the practice 
green with its challenging undulations 
is particularly addictive. Tve hit a 
hundred consecutive balls from the 
same spot, trying for just the right 
combination of loft and strength to 
sink a 65-foot chip shot, including a 
cur\'ing downhill roll to the cup. I 
sank five of them. 

There*s a host of other features 
that add to the realism of this out- 
standing game. If you can't quite 
make out the slope of a green, for in- 
stance, you can overlay grid lines on 
it, making the contours clear. 

One word of caution: All this vid- 
eo wizardry requires a powerful PC 
and takes up over two megabytes of 
hard disk. 

From the spectacular 3-D course 
to the excellent play-control system, 
Links is a golfer's dream, a chance to 
play what feels like real golf without 
ever having to leave home. 

RICHARD O.MANN 



IBM PC and compatibles. 640K RAM, 
MCGA or VGA graphics adapter, hard 
drive; mouse strongty recommended; 
supports extended and expanded memo- 
ry and most sound cards — S59.95 

ACCESS SOFTWARE 
4910 W. Amelia Earhart Dr. 
Salt Lake City, UT 841 16 
(600)800-4880 



BATTIE CHESS II: 
CHINESE CHESS 

The original Battle Chess added a 
new twist to the game of chess by 
adding movement, sound, and a 
sense of humor to the game's me- 
dieval characters. Instead of simply 
sliding from square to square as in 
other computer chess games, the 
knights, bishops, rooks, and other 
pieces on the Battle Chess board actu- 
ally walk to their new squares. Best of 
all, when one piece captures another, 
the square isn't surrendered peacefully 
but is reluctantly vacated after a mini- 
battle that can include anything from 
a sword fight to histrionic spell- 
casting. 




The game pieces come to life in 
Battle Chess II: Chinese Chess. 



Battle Chess II brings this same 
excitement to Chinese chess— a not- 
too-distant cousin of conventional 
chess that developed independently of 
its Western counterpart. Because Chi- 
nese chess features more playing 
pieces than conventional chess, Battle 
Chess II offers even more battle ani- 
mations than the original For in- 
stance, a cannon in Chinese chess fires 
cannonballs in high arcs over the oth- 
er pieces in order to blow up the piece 
being captured. A counselor can do 
away with a pesky pawn by simply 
drawing an oversized mallet from be- 
neath his robe and flattening the pawn 
with one bold stroke. Throughout the 
game, the battles are punctuated with 
the grunts of the combatants and the 
realistic clang of weapons and armor. 

You can play Battle Chess II 
head to head, via modem, or against 
the computer on any of nine different 
skill levels. In addition to the colorful 
three-dimensional board where the 



126 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




18 
JUST GOT MEANER! 




Announcing COMPUTE's 

Mean 18 Course Disk 

Six originally designed, challenging golf courses 
to add to your Mean 18 collection. Each course 
has a unique theme. Play Apple Arbor, a genu- 
ine test of strategy; Pines Par 3, a fast-play 
course for which you'll need all your clubs; City 
Lakes, where water is your best friend and 
worst enemy; Island Green, which requires pre- 
cise distance calculations and deadly accuracy; 
and much, much more. 

The disk is designed to work wrtti Aeoolade's Mean 18. The Mean W program Is so*d 
separately. 

Mean 18 Ultimate Golf is a trademark and copyright of Accolade. Inc. 1986, 1987. 1988. 
1989. 1990. 



► Only $12.95* plus $2.00 postage and 
handling. 

> Available in IBM SVa- or SVa-inch formats or 
in Amiga format. 

^ Send your order to GOLF, 324 West 
Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, Greensboro, 
North Carolina 27408. Be sure to specify 
format desired. 

* Residents of New York and Norm Carolina add appropriate sales tax. Canadian or- 
ders, add 7% goods and services tax. All orders must be in U, 3. funds drawn on a U.S. 
bank. MasterCard or VISA accepted for orders over $20. Include credit card number and 
expiration date. For delivery outside tfie U.S. or Canada, add $1 for surface mail or S3 
for airmail. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. 




REVIEWS 



humorous battles occur, there's a two- 
dimensional board where you can 
play a conventional game of Chinese 
chess. 



BOB GUERRA 



IBM PC and conipatibles; 51 2K (CGA or 
EGA) or 640K (MCGA or VGA) RAM: sup- 
ports Ad Ub, Sound Blaster, Game Blast- 
er, Covox, Innovation, Roland, and Tandy 
sound boards; hard drive and mouse op- 
tional— $49.95 

iNTERPLAY PRODUCTIONS 
3710S, Susan, Ste, 100 
Santa Ana, GA 92704 
(714)549-2411 



THE SWAGE 




When the people at Origin Sys- 
tems issued their new, much 
improved gaming engine in 
Ultima VI, they knew in ad- 
vance that it would be a hit. Under- 
standably, they didn't want to wail 
another year or Ultima episode until 
series producer Richard Garriott 
made use of it again, so the Worlds of 
Ultima spin-offline was created. 

The Savage Empire, the first re- 
lease, re-creates the steamy Grade B 
jungle epics of 1930s Hollywood films 
and puip magazines. Once again you 
play the Avatar, good guy extraordin- 
aire. Sent to a hidden jungle valley 
that's been cut off from the world for 
tens of thousands of years, you'll find 
a variety of oddly juxtaposed cultures 
and large, carnivorous reptiles. What 
begins as your party's attempt to res- 
cue the kidnapped tribal princess Aye- 
sha turns into a broader conflict 
against a deadly, well-organized foe. 
Origin Systems' post-Ultima V 
products mark a radical departure 
from the standard role-playing inter- 
face of icons and stick figures. Con- 
versing with NPCs (NonPlayer 
Characters) brings up images and 
short descriptions of each person. Cit- 
ies are full-size, citizens work, fish 
gotta swim, and birds gotta fly. The 
price one pays for this detailed, ani- 
mated reality is a good computer sys- 
tem; you really should have VGA, a 
sound card, and (above all) an 80386 
microprocessor to sample Origin's 
universe-in-a-program . 

Ultima's basic gaming compo- 



nents remain unchanged, however. 
You're in charge of up to seven char- 
acters at once, who work, fight, and 
converse according to your whims. 
You, in turn, are at the mercy of Gar- 
riolt*s computerized world and a host 
of fictional people whose vividness 
lends to lurch at you through the 
screen. 



■.=:,:::lg^Sm^B.=:^ 



sM 





[You htdf ont of 
syour eoTv\pATtit)T^u 
:5hotii, "'Oc i ekiv', 
Yondpok I I lid 'j 
fdlfrn^ dud tKf 
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iM,.»|,i. "'|'"''fj , from his eyrt' 



Be the main course in Savage Empire. 

Many people will prefer this 
game to Ultima VI, Character images 
are better drawn, and command re- 
sponse lime is slightly faster. Its de- 
signers made Savage Empire a little 
more forgiving of errors of judgment 
and omission than their mainstream 
product. Should you pass up some- 
thing important like ajar of sulfur, for 
instance, you'll find ways to acquire 
more in your surroundings. The 
quests are more varied, too, with 
shorter ones building confidence 
before you crash into the major ef- 
forts. Savage Empire is lengthy and 
involved, but not quite as complex as 
Ultima VL and some moments of hu- 
mor (involving a celebrated comedy 
team of the past) are better integrated 
with the plot. 

In sum, it's an auspicious debut 
to a gaming series from an old and re- 
liable source. Break out the pretzels, 
and keep plenty of mosquito repellent 
handy. 

BARRY BRENESAL 



THE SAVAGE EI^PIRE 

IBM PC and compatibles (10 MHz or fast- 
er recommended), 640K RAM (expanded 
RAM required for music), EGA, MCGA, 
VGA, or Tandy 16-color; mouse and hard 
drive recommended; supports Roland, Ad 
Ub, and Sound Blaster— $59.95 

ORIGIN SYSTEMS 
P.O. Box 161750 
Austin, TX 78716 
(800)999^939 



AinRED DESTINY 

■ t the start of Altered Destiny. Ac- 
II colade's new graphic adveniurCj 
IM P. J. Barrett is sucked bodily 
■ M through his television into a 
strange new world. Although not ex- 
actly the most subtle of plot devices, 
the opening sets the stor>' line in 
motion and establishes the fanciful 
tone needed for the offbeat events to 
follow. 

p. J. ends up on the bizarre planet 
of Daltere. Dallere is a dreamscape 
world that's part fantasy and part 
nightmare. If the environs are foreign, 
though, the goal of the game will be all 
too familiar to veteran adventurers. In 
yet another variation of the '^Universe 
on the Brink of the Apocalypse" 
theme. Altered Destiny charges P. J. 
with the task of recovering a stolen 
jewel that's essential to the planet's 
stability and survival. 

The most puzzling mystery in the 
game is why its designer has resurrect- 
ed such a tired, old scenario. 

You maneuver P. J. around the 
screen with the arrow keys or a mouse 
while giving him specific instructions 
through typed commands. The pro- 
gram is generally adept at understand- 
ing directions, although this seems 
more related to the kinds of actions 
P. J. must perform than the intrinsic 
sophistication of the game's parser. 
For the most pan, you can get away 
with simple, declarative, Tarzan4ike 
sentences. Altered Destiny isn't a very 
verbal game. Even the text descrip- 
tions thai accompany the screen 
graphics tend to be terse. In short, the 
visual elements predominate. 

Visually, the game is a rich col- 
lage of arresting, imaginatively drawn 
landscapes rendered in fluorescent 
colors. The limited animation (flower 
petals waft through the air, and odd 
creatures scurry across the ground) 
adds to the vividness of the screens. 
Like the program's varied and enter- 
taining soundtrack (it even sounds 
good on the PCs internal speaker), 
the inventive imagery creates a mood 
and an impression that complement 
the adventure's far-out setting. 

Altered Destiny is less linear than 
many games of its ilk. It allows you a 
fairly free range of movement on Dal- 
tere. Emblematic of the latitude you 
enjoy is the fact that P. J. starts his ex- 



ile COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




REVIEWS 



ploralion of the planet's surface stand- 
ing in the middle of a crossroads, with 
no clue as to which direction he 
should take. While certain tasks must 
be performed before others, the game 
doesn't force you to adhere to a rigid 
path. 




Take a walk on the wild side . 

On the other hand, although the 
puzzles and pitfalls you encounter in 
the course of R J/s quest are challeng- 
ing, they don't always abide by the 
rules of logic — or eyen fairness. In 
more than one situation, the correct 
response to a problem must be found 
through trial and error. The manual 
warns you to save your position fre- 
quently. This is good advice, given the 
program's tendency to punish mis- 
steps with death. Experimentation is 
also recommended bQcause Altered 
Destiny is a game in which inspira- 
tion — as much as calculation and de- 
duction^ — will carry the day, 

JEFFSEIKEN 



IBM PC or compatibJes (8-MHz or faster 
AT recommended); 640K RAM; DOS 2.1 
or hjgher; hard drive; CGA, EGA, VGA, 
MGGA, or Tandy 16-cofor graphics 
adapter; supports Ad Lib, CMS, Tandy 3- 
voice, Roland MT^ and LAPC-1 . and 
Casio CT460 sound boards; supports 
MJD! instruments; mouse recommend- 
ed— $59.95 

ACCOLADE 
550 S. Winchester Blvd. 
San Jose, CA 951 28 
(800) 245-7744 



STUNT DRIVER 

After my daily commute on South- 
ern California's congested free- 
ways, a driving game should be 
the last thing I would want to 
play on my computer. But that was 
before I discovered Stunt Driver — 



Spectrum HoloByte*s terrific new car 
simulator. 

This game goes beyond the typical 
car-racing simulation by offering 
tracks loaded with radical obstacles. 
Your car loops, jumps, corkscrews, 
and banks to the finish line. This 
roller-coaster race has more twists and 
turns than a contortionists' convention. 

You drive a classic 1966 Shelby 
Mustang, a heavy-muscle car born to 
be driven. With Stunt Driver's five as- 
sorted tracks, three brutal opponents, 
and an editor to create your own 
courses, if you haven't driven a Ford 
lately, you 11 have a formidable chal- 
lenge ahead of you. 

The first thing you'll notice about 
the game is the outstanding graphics. 
Representing the latest generation of 
graphics for home-computer games. 
Stunt Driver features a 256-color VGA 
mode that's stunning. The 16-color 
VGA and EGA are also well done. 
The background mountains look like 
mountains, not like a series of green 
triangles. 

As you drive, you can try to take 
in the excellent scenery. You can 
choose backdrops that look like a for- 
est, Tokyo (watch for Godzilla), Ten- 
don, San Francisco, and others. Even 
when you create your own tracks, the 
program automatically puts in the 
backdrops. 

As in a flight simulator, you can 
watch your progress from a front, 
side, or back view. My favorite view is 
from an imaginary hehcopter that fol- 
lows the can 

You can replay your driving per- 
formance with a clever VCR mode. 
The best reviewer/camera I've seen in 
a game, it's Uterally liJce using a VCR. 
You can scan fast-forward through the 
race to reach the scenes you want to 
see, play back scenes frame by frame» 
and amazingly, switch between the 
views. 

When I overshot a jump or fell 
off the loops, the car flew into the air 
and realistically tumbled bumper over 
bumper on the ground. Then I en- 
joyed reviewing my crashes — frame 
by frame— from the helicopter view. 

Another nice touch is the ability 
to race another player head to head by 
modem. The program also supports 
the Ad Lib sound board for great au- 
dio effects. 

The driving is very challenging — 
in fact, this is the toughest driving 



simulation I've played It's easy to 
overshoot the turns, and it can be 
hard to get going in the right direction 
again. Fortunately, the game provides 
arrows to point you to the ri^t path. 

The package says that a joystick 
is optional In fact, the game designers 
specifically recommend that you use 
the keyboard, and that's what I 
preferred. 

The installation was straightfor- 
ward, and the game was, overall, easy 
to learn. It's the driving skills that take 
some practice to master. 

This was the most iiin I've had 
with any driving simulator. The 
jumps and loops add an exciting twist 
to the racing-game genre. I'm just glad 
I didn't have to learn to drive on this 
challenging race course in real life. I 
can imagine my ft-azzled parents yell- 
ing at me, "Hey! Look out for that 
loop!" 




Drive your car over incredible obstacles 
in Stunt Driver. 

Stunt Driver is an exhilarating 
simulation that lets you forget about 
real driving issues, such as gas prices 
and car insurance premiums. Maybe 
it's the contrast to real driving that 
makes this game such a fun escape 
from reality. It's definitely not just 
another day at the races, and it's cer- 
tainly not Driving Miss Daisy, I re- 
commned Stunt Driver. It's is a rip- 
roaring, dri ve-by-the-seatH>f-your- 
pants thrill ride. 

WAYNE KAWAMOTO 



IBM PC and compatibles; 640K RAM; 
CGA, EGA, VGA, or Tandy 1 6-cx3lor 
graphics adapter; 8-MHz 80286 and hard 
drive recommended; supports Ad Lib and 
Tandy sound boards— S49.95 

SPECTRUM HOLDBYTE 
2061 Challenger Dr 
Alameda, CA 94501 
(415)522-3584 



MAY 1 9 <? 1 



COMPUTE 129 




REVIEWS 



TREASURE TRAP 

In Treasure Trap, you control the 
movements of a diver searching the 
sunken HMS Esmeralda for a 
horde of lost gold. Local creatures 
have estabHshed squatter's rights 
since 1856, however, and don't take 
kindly to your interrupting their daily 
schedules. You have no map, no 
weapons, no keys, and a very limited 
supply of air. Additional air tanks are 
scattered throughout the ship's 100 
rooms, but you don't know where, 
and the electric eels approaching you 
aren't about to tell you. 

At first glance, Treasure Trap re- 
sembles a more sophisticated Mario 
Brothers with its jumping hero, points 
(gold) to collect, moving objects, and 
deadly creatures. But this game's 
graphics are far superior, with detailed 
ship hulls and bulkheads and shad- 
owed highlights that provide good 3- 
D effects. The graphics suffer on a 
CGA-equipped machine, but the EGA 
and VGA versions are stunning. 




Try this adventure in the briny deep. 

The graphics get support from a 
plot right out of Jaws. Electric eels, 
stingrays, hammerhead sharks, and 
piranha all try to make an easy lunch 
out of you. Beyond the unfriendly ma- 
rine life, there are also whirlpools that 
instantly transport you to unknown 
surroundings, .Add to all of this the 
Esmeralda's secret cargo of some 
unknown substance, carried in leaking 
barrels and lethal upon contact. 

One useful feature to this game is 
its optional key reconfiguration. Also 
included are abilities to toggle sound 
effects, remove shadowing (for speed), 
and the all-important pause control 

The original version of Treasure 
Trap used a key-disk copy-protection 
scheme that, in my use, did not oper- 
ate as designed on one-third of the 



computers I tested it on. To the com- 
pany's credit, it has since released a 
version without copy protection. If 
you bought the first version and are 
having problems, you can exchange it 
for free by reluming your original 
disks, along with a brief explanation 
of your problem, to the company's 
Baltimore offices (see address below). 

Arcade addicts will be tempted 
by Treasure Trap's breathtaking vi- 
suals and playful brainteasers. And 
once they give in to that temptation, 
they can anticipate a lot of undersea 
fun. 

BARR^'BRENESAL 



IBM PC and compatibles, 640K RAM. 
CGA, EGA, or VGA— $39.95 
Also available for the Amiga ($39.95) and 
Atari ST (S39.95) 

ELECTRONIC 200 
3431 -A Benson Ave. 
Baltimore, MD 21227 
(301)646-5031 

JAMES BOND: 
THE STEALTH 
AFFAIH 

Santa Paragua may look like a 
sun-soaked South American va- 
cation spot, but you only need to 
scratch the surface to find trouble 
in paradise. In James Bond: The 
STEALTH Affair, you step into the 
secret agent's well-polished shoes. On 
behalf of the American CIA, your job 
is to hunt for a stolen stealth fighter. 

In this animated adventure game, 
Bond runs through a series of crises 
both trivial (getting change to buy a 
flower) and life-threatening (escaping 
a watery grave) in pursuit of the jet. 
Controlled by either keyboard or 
mouse, the Bond of The STEALTH 
Affair moves and acts in a manner 
like that of his namesake in latter-day 
007 movies — that is, choppy and silly, 
trading the quiet sophistication of Ian 
Fleming's hero for a goofy noncha- 
lance. He lapses into confused mutter- 
ing at the first sign of a confrontation, 
trudges across open pavement at a 
sluggish pace, and freezes under 
smart-alecky insults at every wrong 
move. 

While The STEALTH Affair os- 



tensibly offers many options for ac- 
tion, each dilemma actually has only 
one correct resolution. Choosing the 
right option amounts to outguessing 
the whims of the game's creators. 
While some resolutions are challeng- 
ing but logical — as they should be — 
others are almost impossibly obscure. 
If you're lucky, you'll suffer only smug 
putdowns for your mistakes. If you're 
not so lucky, you will watch Bond die 
or be thrown into prison, courtesy of 
Santa Paragua's system of summary 
justice. 




Save the day with Bond, James Bond. 

It's advisable to save your pro- 
gress with every new scenario, since 
Bond succumbs so readily to so many 
different traps. Fortunately, Interplay 
offers American players a hint line to 
call if it becomes impossible to ma- 
neuver Bond out of a scenario. Unfor- 
tunately, it's a 900 number that costs 
$ 1.25 for the first minute and $0.75 
for every additional minute. As a re- 
sult, mistakes can punish your wallet 
almost as much as the animated 
James Bond figure. 

The STEALTH Affair's graphics 
are colorful and varied, placing Bond 
in imaginatively created settings. 
There's a lovely park with a city sky- 
line for a backdrop, a plush hotel cast 
in rich red tones, and an ominous- 
looking dictator's palace where the 
walls are peppered with bullet holes. 
Each scene sports interesting details, 
some of which are necessary for ad- 
vancement while others are red her- 
rings. Frenzied electronic music 
accompanies a handful of crucial 
scenes; it quickly became irritating, 
and 1 toggled it off. A detailed manual 
offers entertaining background mate- 
rial and crucial guidance. 

Bond and the objects around him 
generally respond well to keyboard 
commands. The actions necessary to 
make things work are frustratingly in- 



130 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



COrUIPUTE has the 





HINTS,TIPS. 
& STRATEGIES 

for the most popular 
PC games! 

The Official Book of Ultima 

by Shay Addams 
Introduction by Lord British 

Written with the assistance of Lord British, Ultima's creator, this book 
includes inside information found nowhere else. Packed full of hints, tips, 
anecdotes, and never-before-published clues for all six Ultima adventures. 
244 pages 



The Official Book of 
Leisure Suit Larry 

by Ralph Roberts 
with help from Al Lowe 

Written with the help of the creator 
and desigr^er of Leisure Suit Larry, 
this best-selling book covers Larry I, 
fl, and III. Packed full of all the hints 
and tips. Includes Larry's life story, 
an exclusive interview with Larry 
laffer, and some candid comments 
from Larry's women. 228 pages 



The Official F-19 Stealth Fighter 
Handbook 

by Richard Sheffield 

Foreword by Major "Wild Bill" Stealey 

Take to the skies with F-19 Stealth 
Fighter and test this amazing aircraft. 
Learn all the thrilling maneuvers of 
this fantastic new fighter. Here's the 
key to mastering MicroProses F-19 
Stealth F/^/Tter simulator. 184 pages 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



LJ ICOb I want more hints and tips. 
Please send me the books checked below. 



wLi 



All orders 
shipped 
within 48 
hours. ^ 



The Official F-15 Strike Eagle 
Handbook 

by Richard Sheffield 
Foreword by Sid Meier 

Fly like an ace with MicroProse's 
best-selling F-15 simulators. Covers 
both F'15 Strike Eagle and F-/5 
Sthf<e Eagle II You'll perform tactics 
and maneuvers you never thought 
possible. Filled with step-by-step 
instructions and clear diagrams. 
224 pages 



Turn & Burn: The Authoritative 
Guide to Falcon 

by Howard Bornstein 
Foreword by Gilman Louie 

For both the beginner and experi- 
enced falcon pilot, this book has a 
wealth of information, special tips, 
and proven strategies that will make 
you the master of the skies. Covers 
all versions of Falcor\ and each of the 
12 missions, 248 pages 



n Check or money order D MC D VISA 
Signature 

irBQUired) 

Acct no. 

Name 



. E)(p. Date _ 



D The Official Book of Leisure Suit Larry (21 5X) $12.95 
n The Official M5 Strike Eagle Handbook (2311) $12.95 
D The Official M9 Stealtli Fighter Handbook (2176) $14. 
D The Official Book of Ultima (2281) $14.95 
D Turn & Burn: The Authoritative Guide to Falcon (1978) 

Subtotal 



95 
$12.95 



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City 



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, Sales tax (residents of NC, NY, & NJ add appropriate sales tax). 
Canadian orders add 7% goods and services tax. 

Shipping and Handling: $2 U.S. and Canada; S6 foreign 

Total Enclosed 



Offer good while supplies last. 

All orders must t>e paid in U.S. Junds drawn on a U.S. \mk. Orders will be shipj>ed via 
UPS Ground. 

MAIL TO: Compute Books 
c/o CCC 

2500 McClellan Ave. 
Pennsauken, NJ 08109 mav9ice 




REVIEWS 



consislenl, however In one early 
scene in an airport, where Bond is try- 
ing to figure out which luggage to take, 
the game is maddeningly unrespon- 
sive. And a few of the error messages 
contain annoying typographical 
errors. 

Just as The STEALTH Affair ot> 
scures thieving miHtary dictators and 
double-crossing secret agents behind 
sunny tropical locales, the game ob- 
scures some strict Hmitations on ac- 
tion behind an apparent wealth of 
options. When every dilemma has 
only one real solution, resolving pre- 
dicaments can truly be an exercise in 
frustration. 

LEDDIE HUFFMAN 



IBM PC and compatibles: 51 2K RAM; 
CQA, EGA. MCGA, VGA. or 16-color 
Tandy; hard disk recommended; supports 
Microsoft mouse and Roland MC-32 and 
Ad Lib sound cards— $54.95 
Afso available for the Amiga ($54.95). 

INTERPLAY PRODUCTIONS 
371 OS. Susan, Ste. 100 
Santa Ana^ CA 92704 
(714)549-2411 



SIMGITY 



axis has released two sets of al- 
ternative graphics for its wildly 
popular SimCity game. Set i 
provides cities from Genghis 
Khan's Asia, the Wild West, and me- 
dieval times. Set 2 offers futuristic cit- 
ies in Europe, in the United Stales, 
and on the moon. It replaces aircraft 
with dragons (among other changes). 




Build the European city of tomorrow. 

and threatens cities of the past and fu- 
ture with different kinds of disasters. 
Electrical power and railroads are re- 



placed with aqueducts and stone 
paths. Factories become windmills, 
rice paddies, or smithies, depending 
on the scenario. The game itself plays 
exactly the same, which may disap- 
point some. 

ROBERT BIXBY 



IBM PC and compatibles with 51 2K RAM 
(640K tor EGA graphics}— $34.95 
Also available for the Amiga ($34.95) and 
the Macintosh ($34.95) 
Requires SimCity 

MAXIS SOFTWARE 
1042 Country Club Dr., Ste. C 
Moraga, CA 94556 
(415)376-6434 



STUNTS 



Driving simulations have acceler- 
ated into the fast lane since the 
original Test Drive. This lime, 
Distinctive Software, the devel- 
oper of the Test Drive series, has 
teamed up with Broderbund Software 
to bring us a racecar driver's dream, a 
game simply called Stunts. 

As a stunt-car racer, you choose 
from an arsenal of 1 1 road rockets 
ranging from Indy-car racers to ele- 
gant sports roadsters to off-road 
puddle-jumpers. To gel the feel of the 
controls and the inventive stunt 
tracks, I started with the Lamborghini 
LM-002, a $120,000 four-wheel drive 
with a top speed of only 126 mph. 
When I switched to the Jaguar XJR9 
IMSK a $325,000 Indy car with a top 
speed of 215 mph, it was like going 
from the cockpit of a twin-engine 
Cessna to that of an F-19. The feeling 
of power under the Jaguar's hood was 
exhilarating. 

The stunt tracks include such 
challenges as steeply banked curves, 
open drawbridges (you'd better be do- 
ing at least 90 mph if you want to 
make it to the other side), loops, cork- 
screws, slaloms, and a devious pipe (a 
simple round tunnel with a nasty ce- 
ment block in the middle). You have 
to drive up onto the wall of the pipe in 
order to miss the block, then be back 
on the level before you exit the pipe- 
There are also hills, elevated road- 
ways, and spirals. If ihaf s not enough, 
you can change the track to dirt or icy 
roads. 

While all this sounds good, you 
have to see this game to have an in- 



kling of what it's all about. Driving, of 
course, you see the cockpit view out 
the windshield. But after youVe 
crashed (or completed your lap, once 
you've polished your skills a little), 
you can run a videotaped replay of the 
race. A VCR-like control panel lets 
you run the tape forward and back, 
watch it frame by ft^me, and select 
your point of view. You can see it 
again from the driver's seat or select 
the TV-camera view, which shows 
your car approaching then receding 
from a series of remote cameras along 
the track. 

The most fun is the helicopter 
view. You can zoom in and out, move 
the helicopter camera up and down, 
and change the angle of view through 
360 degrees. As you move the point of 
view, the scenery, horizon, and race- 
track all change appropriately. Al- 
though the scenery and the cars are 
mostly polygons that are fairly jaggy- 
looking, the illusion works. It feels 
like a race as you drive, and it looks 
like a race as you watch the videotape. 




Race over roads with corkscrew turns 
in Stunts. 

Stunts has nice touches through- 
out, such as the choice of six oppo- 
nents with varying degrees of skill. 
Helen Wheels and Skid Vicious are 
the best of the lot In the evaluation 
panel that appears after each race, 
your adversary appears in a digitized 
animation to either rub your nose in 
your loss or pout about your superior 
abilities. 

The developers have created 
painstakingly accurate simulations of 
the driving characteristics of these 1 1 
cars; you'll come to recognize the feel 
and sound of each. They accelerate 
differently, they spin out at different 
speeds, and they even have individual 
characteristics when airborne. 

In addition to the traditional 
cursor-key control system, you can 



132 COMPUTE 



MAY 



19 9 1 



COMPUTE'S 

BEST PC GA 

Don't miss these six dazzling, ready-to-mn games complete 
with a 16-page magazine jammed with instructions! 









Laser Chess 

Award-winning, two-player strategy 

ganne patterned after chess— but 

with an exciting new twist. 



Power Poker 

Addictive strategy game with a new 

dimension. Fun for one player or a 

group. 



Block Out 

Colorful and delightful strategy 

game that everyone in the family 

will want to play. 




r^ ORH SURNER ^ 
11 ^^}.."^.. " \ 




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; X 






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1 I , .| , , 1 1. 1 1 . . ; . 


ii ii : i : : 1 : ' : 1 : ; . 1 : 




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^ 












Bounty Hunter 

Catch the crook and collect the 

bounty! So much fun, you'll never 

know you're mastering U.S. 

geography. 



Wormburner 

Skill and arcade action combine to 
form an unbeatable challenge. 



Supplies Limited, So Order Earfyl 



CNiikServe 

Fling those fries! Sling those 

shakes! Bounce those burgers! A 

frenzied arcade-style game for the 

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YES 



I 



I want to have the time of my flfel Send 
me COMPUTE'S BEST PC GAMES disk. I'll pay just 
$5.95 for each 5V4-!nch or $6.95 for each 3y2-inch 
disk plus $2.00 shipping and handling per disk. 

Please indicate how many disks of each formal you*d tike: 
^5V4-inch disks at)g:dfr'«ach $5.95 each 

3V2-inch disks at $JJtS64Qch $6.95 each 

Subtotal 

Sales tax (Residents of NO and NY, please add appro- 
priate sales tax for your area. Canadian orders, add 7% 
goods and services tax. ) 

^ Shipping and handling ($2.00 U.S. and Canada, $3.00 

surface mail, $5.00 airmail per disk. For delivery out- 
side the U.S. or Canada, add $10.00 for postage and 
handling.) 

Total enclosed 



Name 

Address . 



City 

State/Province 

ZIP/Postal Code 

Check or Money Order 

Credit Card No 

Signature . 



. MasterCard _ VISA 
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[Requirecf} 



Daytime Telephone No 

Send your order to COMPUTE'S BEST PC GAMES 
324 W. Wendover Ave., Ste. 200 
Greensboro, NC 27408 

AN orders must be paid m U.S. funds by check drawn on 3 US bank Of by money order MasterCard 
or VISA accepted for orders over S20 This offer wfl only be filled at the above address and ts n(« 
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REVIEWS 



drive these cars by Tiouse; left and 
right mouse movements turn the 
steering wheel. I found the mouse 
movements to be loo hard to learn, so 
I soon drove exclusively by keyboard. 

Once you've mastered the half- 
dozen increasingly complex tracks 
that come with the game, you can de- 
sign your own tracks using the basic 
building blocks. Youll be able to cre- 
ate tracks formidable enough to keep 
you challenged, no matter how well 
honed your driving reflexes become. 

^'mAi^s' extensive graphics and 
complex simulation algorithms re- 
quire a powerful computer: a 286 ma- 
chine running at 8 MHz or better is 
recommended. The game also re- 
quires a tremendous amount of mem- 
ory. If you have any TSRs running, 
you'll have to unload them in order to 
run Stunts, For me, this meant creat- 
ing a separate boot disk just to run the 
game, which rankles a little. 

If you have an unfulfilled desire 
to drive the hottest racing cars on the 
planet or if you fantasize about driv- 
ing in an exciting TV-style car chase 
with jumps and other stunts, you can 
work off a lot of that energy with 
Stunts. The cars are satisfyingly realis- 
tic, the stunts are dramatically excit- 
ing, and you can create (and save) 
computerized videotapes of your ex- 
ploits. In addition, the highway patrol 
will thank you for confining your 
stunt driving to your computer room. 

RICRAJID O. MANN 



IBM PC and compatibles; 51 2K for CGA 
and Hercules, 640K for EGA, MCGA, 
VGA, or Tandy 16-cotor; 8-MHz 286 or 
faster processor recommended; mouse 
or joystick option a[^$49. 95 

BROOERBUND SOFTWARE 

17 Paul Or 

San Rafael. CA 94903-2101 

(800)521-6263 

HOYIE'S OFFICIAl 
BOOK OF GAMES 

Although Sierra is best known for 
its 3'D graphic adventures such 
as the Space Quest and Leisure 
Suit Larry series, Hoyle's Official 
Book of Games, Volume 2 proves that 
the company also knows a thing or 
two about strategy games, Hoyle's 2 is 
a feature-packed program thai boasts 



28 card games for the solitaire con- 
noisseur. The collection includes 
everything from old standbys like Pyr- 
amid and Klondike to several lesser- 
known solitaire games such as Scor- 
pion, Fortress, and Penguin, The 
program's designer, Warren Sch wader, 
has even tossed in a couple of his own 
creaUons— Bowling and Slide, 

No matter which game you se- 
lect, the cards are neatly arranged on- 
screen and can be easily manipulated 
with your choice of control device — 
keyboard, joystick, or mouse. Mouse 
control is the easiest, but when no 
mouse is available, either of the other 
methods works just fine. 

All of these solitaire games can be 
played at an easy or hard level of diffi- 
culty. But even with two difficulty lev- 
els, some games are much easier to 
win than others. Once you've selected 
a game and difficulty level, you may 
also choose the game's background 
color and the design of the deck you'll 
be using. While an unusual design 
won't improve your chances of win- 
ning, the option of choosing your own 
deck makes playing Hoyle's 2 that 
much more enjoyable. 

Other options let you toggle the 
sound on and off, adjust the cursor 
speed, and set the animation speed. 
This last option determines how fast 
cards are spun into place at the start of 
the game and how quickly they're 
flipped from the deck to the stockpile. 

All in alL Hoyle's 2 is a terrific 
way to pass some free time. Once 
you've installed it on your laptop, 
you'll never again be bored waiting at 
an airport terminal. If I had to find 
one fault with the program, it's that it 
doesn't allow you to save games in 
progress. Nevertheless, Hoyle's Offi- 
cial Book of Games, Volume 2 will 
provide hours of solid entertainment 
for anyone who enjoys a good game of 
skill and chance. 

BOBGUERRA 



IBM PC and compatibles (8 MHz or faster 
recommended); joystick or mouse option- 
al— $34.95 

Also available in a monochrome MS-DOS 
laptop version ($19.95) and for the Amiga 
($34.95), Atari ST ($34.95), and Macintosh 
($34.95) 

SIERRA ONLINE 
P.O. Box 485 
Coarsegold.CA 93614 
(209) 683-4468 



SMH CUNIHUL 

This is not just another space 
game. While Star Control revives 
several classic game themes, it im- 
proves on them all and gives you 
plenty of options. Whether you decide 
to fight for the Alliance (good guys) or 
the Hierarchy (bad guys), you can 
choose one of 14 different craft to pi- 
lot, each with a truly distinct 
personality. 




Choose among 14 ships, each with a 
distinct personality, in Star Control 

To help you out, stunning digi- 
tized graphics provide vital infor- 
mation about each ship. Pay attention 
here because knowing your ship helps 
you develop tactics to exploit enemy 
weaknesses. 

Once battle has begun » you see 
your ship represented in deep space, 
with stars and planets floating by in 
different directions. The fine detail 
and multiple animations give the ac- 
tion a 3-D feel. As your ship and the 
enemy ship approach or dart away 
from each other, the screen zooms in 
and out. This ensures that both space- 
craft appear on the screen at all times 
while providing the greatest possible 
detail. 

The real virtues of Star Control 
emerge when you graduate to playing 
a full game. There are nine war game 
scenarios to choose from and an op- 
tion to design your own. Generally, 
each places you in command of a 
handful of specific ships, pitted against 
an enemy who, one way or another, is 
as strong as you are. Taking turns, you 
and your opponent set out to explore 
planets. Ideally, you discover worlds 
where you can establish strategically 
important mines or colonies. 

Don't think the strategy involved 
is an afterthought. In a full game, it's 
vital. Accolade wisely incorporated a 



134 



COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




REVIEWS 



save-game feature into Siar Control, 
as a well-fought scenario can last sev- 
eral hours. 

Player options are extensive. A 
human or the computer can exercise 
exclusive control over each side. If 
you'd like, the computer can control 
either the strategic moves or the tacti- 
cal fighting of a camp. Either player 
can navigate by keyboard or joystick. 
The keyboard seems to offer the best 
control, but ditch the key defaults. 
Star Control allows you to define your 
keys, and that really helps the 
playability. 

CGA screens are adequate, EGA 
good, and VGA gorgeous. The sup- 
ported game boards primarily provide 
different weapon sounds. While every- 
thing sounded perfect on my CMS 
board, you don't have to own a sound 
card to fully enjoy the program. 

Star Control works just fine on a 
floppy-only system, but to run it on 
anything less than an AT-class ma- 
chine requires stripping off a lot of the 
visual and audio features that you 
wouldn't want to miss. Documenta- 
tion is very good. The off-disk copy 
protection is probably the least bur- 
densome yet most effective I've seen. 

Accolade deser\'es credit for tak- 
ing the time to integrate the many di- 
verse facets of Star Control into a 
cohesive package, paying obvious at- 
tention to minute detail in every as- 
pect of this game. It may be another 
space game, but it's a space game with 
everything done right. 

WARREN QU IN LAN 



IBM PC and compatibfes; 51 2K RAM tor 
CGA or EGA, 640K RAM for MCGA. 
VGA, or Tandy; 8-MHz or faster AT class 
recommended; supports Ad Ub, Tandy, 
CMS, and Roland MT-32— $49.95 

Also available tor Anniga. 1 MEG — $49-95 

ACCOLADE 
550 S. Winchester Blvd. 
San Jose, CA 95128 
(408) 295-8400 (support) 
(800) 245-7744 (orders) 




Hatch the roses — they bite. 
Careful of the Httle giri— she's 
lethal. Hying fish are key to 
your survival. Is this a night- 
mare or another David Lynch movie? 
Weird Dreams is a little of both, a 



game that traps you in a surreal envi- 
ronment from which you must es- 
cape, checkered pajamas and all. The 
only way out is to wake yourself up, 
but you won't be able to do that until 
you experience some of the strangest 
adventures ever seen on a computer 
screen. 




Well hello, Dali, it's so good to have you 
back In dreams where you belong. 

Like most action games of this 
kind, Weird Dreams deposits you in a 
series of potentially deadly situations 
that you must survive by using your 
wits and joystick skill. Make your way 
through all the screens, and you 
achieve the ultimate goal of the game 
(in this case, to reassemble your badly 
addled brain and make it through the 
surgery you seem to be undergoing). 
What's refreshing and different in this 
adventure is the game's unpredictable 
sense of humor and use of graphics 
that would give Salvador Dali pause. 

The gameplay will be very famil- 
iar to sword-and-sorcery gamesters, 
even if it does require a fish or soccer 
ball instead of a sword. Instead of 
dragons and trolls, there are more un- 
usual adversaries. Watch out for 
seemingly innocent objects; unwary 
encounters with these are likely to re- 
sult in sudden, gruesome (sometimes 
gniesomely funny) death. To survive, 
you've got to kill just about ever>'- 
thing you meet and grab anything that 
you can pick up. 

The package includes a useful 
hint book and a long-winded novella 
that sets the scene for the game itself 
but which won't help you much in 
playing it. (You'll need the novella to 
pass the game's copy protection.) A 
joystick is also highly recommended, 
although you can play from the key- 
board. One irritating flaw is the lack 
of a save-game feature; after five 
deaths, you're back at the beginning. 



While Weird Dreams is certainly 
something different in the all too pre- 
dictable world of computer gaming, I 
found myself wishing it were even 
more different. A lot of the game de- 
pends on joystick refiexes. The game 
would' ve broken new ground if it had 
required players to figure out the kind 
of intensely personal symbolisms and 
puzzles that dreams really present. 
You get some of the fiavor of a generic 
dream, without the emotional urgency 
that all real dreams have. Sometimes I 
wanted to talk with some of the char- 
acters I met, but to progress required 
more violence than voice. The nastier 
opponents tend to be female (the little 
girl, the ballerina, the queen bee); 
game programmers ought to be more 
sensitive to these issues. 

Perhaps my wish is really a call 
for a radically different kind of com- 
puter game, one that Weird Dreams 
only hints at. All in all, the game was 
fun, an odd diversion from the usual 
without being a complete reverse of 
the familiar. All that's required to 
have a good time with Weird Dreams 
is a quirky sense of humor — and it 
helps if you aren't too squeamish. 

STEVEN ANZOVIN 



IBM PC and compatibfes, 640K RAM, 
CGA, EGA, or VGA graphics; joystfcK 
recommended — $39.95 
Also available for the Amiga (39.95). Atari 
ST (39.95), and Commodore 64 ($29.95) 

MICROPROSE 
ISOLakefrontDr. 
Hunt Valley, MD 21030 
(800)876-1151 



SPEllGASTING 
101 

■ ■I ith SpeUcasting 101, game de- 
llll signer Steve Meretzky (Zork 
■III Zero) has taken a text-and- 
■ ■ graphics interface and re- 
vamped it for gamers new to text 
adventures. The strong plot and Mer- 
etzky's irreverence give the game a 
unique flavor. You play the role of 
Ernie Eaglebeak, a nerd who lusts 
after the hand of Lola Tigerbelly and 
who aspires to be a famous sorcerer. 

The game is separated into chap- 
ters, the first of which involves Ernie's 
escape from home in Port Gekko. 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 135 



A SELECTION OF USEFUL AND IMAGINATiVE PRODUCTS 

T THE MAGICAL SPARE BED ^■^^^■F j^^^^^^BJ^^H T GOURMET POPCORN POPPER 

I t's almost like pulling an extra bed out 
I of a hat Unlike most spare beds that 
gobble up storage space and are unwieldy 
to move, this one rolls down to fit a 36" 
long, 3 "-diameter canvas case, to stash in 
a closet corner, car trunk, camper, any- 
where Yet it unrolls in minutes to a full-size 
27" X 73" bed that will even accommodate 
6-footer5, supports up to 500 pounds and 
IS comfortable to boot. The secret's in the 
inventive construction: a cotton canvas 
sling is supported on laminated steel legs 
with 6 steel springs for cushioning and sta* 
bility on rough ground. Toss the carrying 
strap over your shoulder and go — camp- 
ing, beach, poolside; the 10" legs keep it off 
damp ground and sand. Of course, this bed 
is indispensable at home country home, 
dorm — even for kids in motel rooms, A su* 
perb value at $61,98 (S12.25) #A1931. 



Ali new high temperature 6 qt popcorn 
popper. Most electric and hot-air pop- 
pers "puff" the corn more than they "pop" 
It, leaving it tough with hard centers. This 
flat-bottomed stove*top popper reaches 
475° and pops full in two minutes with 6 
quarts of the best popcorn you ever tast- 
ed. Stirring paddle with through-the-crank 
handle virtually eliminates burnt or un- 
popped kernels. Wooden handle for safe 
gnp, two dump lids Pop without oil for de- 
licious diet popcorn 570 calories per 4 qt 
bowl Produce tender, fluffy old fashioned 
movie theater popcorn. Made in the USA 
$27.98 (55.25) M1965. 




T LAMB5W00L DUSTERS 




LambswDOl contains a natural static 
charge that makes dust literally leap off 
surfaces. This magnetic attraction is just 
the thing for dusting off bric^a-brac, china, 
crystal, pictures, anything. Our dusters are 
imported from England. They are the fluffi- 
est, highest quality lambswool m the world' 
We offer a set of four lambswool dusters 
our 27" duster, our telescoping duster 
which extends to more than four feet— lets 
you reach high corners, top shelves, over* 
head lights and collapses to 28", and two 
mini dusters for extra fragile objects. 
$22.98 (S4.00) M1870 



r THE ORGANIZER 



Our versatile hold-all organizer looks 
great. Jaunty geese decorate both 
front and back of a folding stand made of 
walnut-finish wood. The 11 y2 "-deep pocket 
gussetted a the sides, keeps everything 
neat-from magazines and newspapers to 
yarn or you-name-it. It stands 14" tall x 19" 
wide X 6" including handles that make it 
easy to tote projects to another room. 
$32.98 (34.00) #A1797. 




• • • • • 

• * • • 




T FOOD FOR WOOD 



M 



ost of the con- 
venience waxes I 
you buy actually dry 
out wood instead of 
nourishing it. What's 
the alternative? Our 
choice IS Williamsville 
Wax. It IS made of 
beeswax and lemon 
oil, heat-blended with 
other natural oils. It ' 
can be used on any type of wood, any type 
of finish, on paneling or kitchen cabinets 
as well as fine furniture Williamsville Wax 
is super for restoring neglected or mistreat- 
ed wood. Two 8'OZ. bottles cost $13.98 
(S3.25) ^A14312. 




HOW TO 
ORDER 

30 Day 
Money Back 

Guarantee 
For Exchange 

or Refund 



CALL TOLL FREE 24 HOURS A DAY, 7 DAYS A WEEK 

1-800-365-8493 

For Customer Service Only 
1-800-678-4955 (M-F: 9 AM-5 PM EST) 

we Honor: 
Mastercard, Visa, and American Express, 



if ordering by mail send remittance to 
MAIL ORDER MALL, Dept CP-051; 
P.0, Box 5006, Lakewood, NJ, 08701. 
Item price is followed by shipping 
and handling in ( ), Be sure to add 
both together to arrive at total price 
N.i residents add 7% sales tax. When 
using credit card — include account 
number, exp. date, signature Sorry, no 
Canadian, foreign or COQ orders. 



Magalog Marketing GrouD Inc © 1991 



1905 Swarthmore Ave, Lakewood. NJ 08701 



f THE BEST RECEPTION EVERl 



▼ NEW TALKING CHESS SET TEACHES, TALKS AND SQUAWKS 



Eliminate radio sig- 
nal fade and ag- 
gravating cross over 
signals that garbie the 
sound. The new LS4 
omni-directional anten- 
na is the only indoor 
antenna that thinks for 
itself. The micro chip 
brain receives signals 
and isolates them into 
individual clear fre- 
quencies. Features the 
Gallium Arsenide Field 
Effect Transistor No 
need to redirect this 
antenna. Leave it where 
it is and its 560 degree 
radius allows it to 
receive from any direc- 
tion. This antenna will 
boost your radio sig- 
nals up to 24 decibels 
for the clearest recep- 
tion you have ever ex- 
perienced. Easy to in- 
stall, light vi/eight. Plugs ;^| 
into any stereo model. 
Unique modern design, 
Made in the USA. UL 
listed. 1 year warranty. 
Dimensions: 5" 
X4.125" X 17.25". 
$58.98 (S5.25)#A1 891 




r INNOVATIVE IONIZER 

A sophisticated electronic device that 
uses nature's way of cleaning air — 
emitting trillions of negatively charged ions 
that act like magnets, attra cting m icroscop- 
ic particles of 
dust, smoke and 
pollen. This tiny 
unit (r/3"x3") 
provides an in- 
genious solu- 
tion, plugging 
right into any 
wall outlet With 
"on" indicator 
light and collec- 
tor pad that 
can be rinsed. 
$39.98 ($4,00) 
^A1867 




little character 
I screaming out "You Blew It" 
or "Cheater!" That's what this 
revolutionary talking chess 
set blurts out in a human 
voice when you make a bad 
chess move; and its vocabu- 
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there's an arrogant chess 
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beat 98% of the world's chess playing population It's a cinch to operate and a blast to 
play It IS high tech in design, high speed in terms of brain power, and high energy as 
your opponent. Includes a special move-assist feature for blind players. The only chess 
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not included). $169.98 (S7,00) #A1994. 



f WORDFINDER 225 




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prove and expand their use of the English 
language Batteries included $115.98 
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REVIEWS 



Chapter 2 begins at Sorcerer Universi- 
ty, where Spellcasting 101 really gets 
started. An evil bunch of hooded ruf- 
fians ransack the school, and every- 
body disappears. Solving this mystery 
is the goal of the game, and it involves 
putting together the pieces of the Sor- 
cerer's Appliance. 




That or black magic will have you in Its 
spell with its many surprises. 



The interface for Spellcasting 10 1 
is one of the easiest I've ever seen for 
such a game. A window at the top of 
the screen can show a picture of your 
location, an overhead map, your in- 
ventory, your status, or a verbal de- 
scription of your current location. 
You can toggle these options with the 
function keys. For those who have no 
desire or talent for typing, don't fear. 
Gameplay isn't hampered by the 
point-and-click interface. 

Spellcasting 10 1 features out- 
standing graphics. Some of the pic- 
tures are a little risque, but you can 
play the game in naughty or nice 
mode. (Frankly, I didn't see much 
difference.) 

All of this ribaldry is easily in- 
stalled on a hard drive. It supports 
most graphics modes and the Ad Lib 
and Roland sound boards. The game's 
puzzles are challenging but not so 
hard that they make you want to quit. 
As sophomoric fun without a trace of 
redeeming social value, Spellcasting 
10 1 appeals to the Animal House in 
all of us. 

RUSSCECCOLA 



IBM PC and compatibles— $59,95 

LEGEND ENTERTAINMENT 
Distributed by MicroProse 
ISOLakefrontDr. 
HL>ntVaIiey,MD 21030 
(800)876-1151 



FULl MEIAL 
PIANET 

This science-fiction strategy game 
is better than most but not quite 
as good as it could be. It takes its 
scenario from 1940s-50s industri- 
al science fiction; you're in charge of 
an armed expedition to mine ore on 
an unstable planet. At your disposal 
are barges, tanks, cargo haulers, and 
attack boats. There's also a clever ve- 
hicle called the Weather Hen, which 
can not only manufacture replace- 
ment equipment but also forecast the 
planet's extraordinary tides. Yours 
isn't the only crew working the world. 
Your opponents possess the same 
tools and arms. 

The planet itself has plenty of 
valuable ore, but the world's terrain 
makes extracting minerals difficuh. 
Before each turn, a substantial tide 
alters the landscape. Dr>' ground can 
become swamp or even waterway, 
stranding your equipment or provid- 
ing your enemies with access to your 
resources. 




Be careful— this planet is all mine. 

Full Metal Planet is a timed game 
with 25 turns. You have the option of 
setting the length of each turn on the 
opening menu. Up to four players, hu- 
man or computer, can compete for the 
mineral resources. Several computer 
opponents are included, each offering 
a different strategic challenge. 

The game all but requires a 
mouse, and its interface takes some 
getting used to. Use the cursor to 
guide your vehicles and to access vari- 
ous menus and commands. The 
game's manual doesn't explain these 
commands as clearly as it should, so 1 
recommend watching a couple of 
completely computer-controlled turns 



before trying your hand at the con- 
trols. It's also worthwhile to play 
against a single computer opponent 
before taking on more than one. 
When you place several rival mining 
groups on the map, things become 
hectic and violent very quickly. To 
win, you must escape the planet's sur- 
face with the most points, which are 
rewarded for ore and recovered 
equipment. 

One annoying flaw interfered 
with my fun. The game insists that 
you complete its copy-protection 
scheme every time you start a new 
game. Copy protection upon execut- 
ing a program is one thing; requiring it 
when you start a new game from with- 
in the program itself is altogether 
unnecessary^ 

Within its own context, Full Met- 
al Planet is a solid strategy game. It 
would be interesting to see what its 
designers could do with the game's en- 
gine by way of offering different plan- 
etary surfaces and types. It certainly 
has potential for creating the basis for 
a much larger game. 

KEITH FERRELL 



IBM PC and compatibles, 51 2K RAi^- 

$49.95 

Also available for the Amiga {$49.95) 

DATA EAST 

1850 Little Orchard St 

San Jose, CA 95125 

(408)286-7074 



BILL ELLIOnS 




CHALLENGE 



ffe tock car racing has always been 
^^ the romantic favorite on the pro 
■ ■ racing circuit, the poor cousin to 
U Grand Prix glamour and Indy 
500 high-tech. With its roots in Prohi- 
bition-era moonshine running and its 
heroes sel^effacing good old boys 
from down the pike, the NASCAR 
road-running track meets have all you 
need for spending a perfectly good 
Sunday afternoon engulfed in noise, 
steel, and the checkered flag. 

Bill Elliott 5 NASCAR Challenge 
brings those Sunday afternoons home, 
with a simulation that puts PC sports 
players in the driver's seat of one of 



138 COMPUTE MAY 1991 



TOMWESSEIMANN 



THOMAS Mcknight 



NEW 

YORK'S 

BEST 



SELLING. DUYfNG. TRADING, BROKERING 
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161 W. 72nd St. (Oer. Col & AmsO 212-724-3715 amewcahdi 



FINE 

ART 

SOURCE 




REVIEWS 



three hot stock cars: a Ford Thunder- 
bird, a Pontiac Grand Prix, or a Chev- 
rolet Lumina, And even though the 
NASCAR rules are straightforward on 
what modifications you can make to 
your car, it's plain to see that these 
aren't your everyday showroom mod- 
els. They may look like the cars you 
see on your dealer's lot, but when you 
get inside and put your sneakers 
through the floorboard, youUl have a 
whole new appreciation for the Amer- 
ican automobile. 




Gear it down and hit the straightaways 
with Bin EllioWs NASCAR Chaitenge. 

Racing is more than cars, how- 
ever. It's also the driver and the skills 
he or she can bring to bear when bar- 
reling down the asphalt. You'll need 
all the practice you can get before you 
take to the blacktop in this game, be- 
cause the cars are tricky to control, 
even with manual shifting. 

Races take place on any of eight 
topflight NASCAR speedways: Atlan- 
ta, Bristol (Tennessee, home of the 
first Winston Cup series race), Dar- 
lington, Daytona (a trioval course that 
begs for speed), Michigan, Sears 
Point, Talladega (claiming the fastest 
500-mile stock car race), and Watkins 
Glen, If you're starting out, you can 
practice on any of these courses. If 
you're ready for racing, you can race a 
single race on any of the courses or go 
right to the championship season. A 
season of racing takes your through all 
eight tracks and awards points on 
your finishes. The top finisher walks 
away with the coveted championship 
trophy. 

As with any racing game, realism 
boils down to how well the simulation 
controls the cars as they make their 
way around the track or down the 
street. With BillEUioti's NASCAR 
Challenge, gear shifting is extremely 
accurate and realistic, while steering is 
a little less accurate and more diffi- 



cult. And although you can't escape 
the feeling that you're in a race when 
you are surrounded by other cars, 
once you're alone on the track, it's dif- 
ficult to see that you're on a racetrack. 

This simulation blends bit- 
mapped graphics (for animated detail) 
and filled polygons (for fast graphic 
processing and a 3-D effect) in an at- 
tempt to capture the look and feel of 
NASCAR racing. The detail inside the 
cars is terrific, with finely drawn 
gauges and an animated gearshift that 
tracks your shift patterns. Outside 
your car, however, the filled polygons 
fail to deliver the same level of real- 
ism, though they enhance the feeling 
of speed. 

Sound support is superb, with an 
upbeat theme song giving way to ex- 
tremely realistic engine sounds. The 
noise of shifting and the squeal of tires 
in the cur\^es add excitement to the 
simulation and promote the game's 
realistic sense. 

While you have only three cars 
from which to choose, the game al- 
lows for several adjustments to your 
car's equipment so that you can modi- 
fy it to suit your driving style and the 
track you're racing on. Ever>ahing 
from the engine (qualifying or racing) 
to tire stagger is adjustable. If, for ex- 
ample, you choose to qualify before 
evcr> race (Auto-Qualify is also an op- 
tion; you will start at the back of the 
pack), you can put a qualifying engine 
in your car which you will discard 
after you secure your starting position. 
If you like to gas it hard out of curves, 
you'll want to set the gear ratio higher. 
If the racetrack is an oval with banked 
curves, you'll want to adjust the tire 
stagger on your car. You can also ad- 
just the angle of your spoiler, to help 
the car stabilize at high speeds. Modi- 
fication is the soul of stock-car racing. 

If what you want out of life is 
speed, thrills, crackups, and a kiss at 
the winner's circle, belt yourself into 
this racer. It's a rubber-burning treat 
for any racing fan. 
PETER scisco 



IBM PC and compatibles (AT-class). 640K 
RAM, EGA or VGA— S49.95 
Amiga ($49.95) and Macintosh ($49.95) 
scheduled for spring 1 991 release. 

KONAMl 

900 Deerfield Pkwy. 

Buffalo Grove, I L 60089 

(708)215*5111 



IVAN "IRONMAN" 
STEWART'S 
SUPER OFF RRAR 

Bump your way to victory! Race 
three monster trucks across 
rough terrain; the first to com- 
plete four laps wins. Avoid obsta- 
cles — hitting them slows you down or 
makes you lose control. Graphics are 
only fair. Sometimes you can't tell 
which direction your truck's facing, 
even in VGA. On a 386, Ivan "Iron- 
man " Stewart 's Super Off Road plays 
almost too fast; it's easy to oversteer. 
The sensation of speed is lost on an 
XT — but it's easier to win. 



KAREN LEE SIEPAK 



IBM PC and compatibfes. 51 2K RAM, 
EGA, VGA, or Tandy 16-color; game card 
and joystick required for muWpfayer op- 
tion— $39.99 

VIRGIN MASTERTRONIC 
18001 Cowan St, Sle. A 
Irvine, CA 92714 
[714)833-8710 

RRCK TALES: THE 
QUEST FAR GRLO 

rlintheart Glomgold will become 
Duck of the Year — unless you're 
willing to travel the world in 
search of treasures for Uncle 
Scrooge McDuck. Flying is half the 
fun: Dodge clouds, towers, and even 
falling pianos in the race against 
Glomgold. You'll help Huey, Dewey, 




In Duck TaieSf you'll help Uncle Scrooge 
span the world in the quest for gold. 



140 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



CONQUER 
NINTENDO 



® 




WITH THESE BOOKS 
FROM COMPUTE 



COMPUTEI's Guide to 
Nintendo Games 

Packed with hints and tips for better 
play and dozens of reviews of avail- 
able game cartridges for the Nintendo 
Entertainment System, 
272 pages. $9,95 

COMPUTE'S Nintendo Secrets 

More strategies, hints, tips, reviews, 
and ratings for dozens of the newest, 
most popular Nintendo games, Max- 
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Batman, Ninja Gaiden II, and more. 
198 + 8 color pages, $8.95 

Conquering Zelda: 

The Unauthorized Guide 

Finally — the hints and techniques you 

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Step-by-step instructions to rescue the 

princess! 

128 pages, $7.95 



I want more hints 
and tips. Please send me the books 
checked below 

D COMPUTEI's Guide to Nintendo Games 
(2214) $9.95 

D COMPUTERS Nintendo Secrets (2346) $8.95 

D Conquering 2eida: The Unautliorized Guide 
(2397} $7.95 



Sales tax (Residents of UC, NY. & NJ add 
appropriate sales tax), Canadsan orders add 
7% Goods and Services tax 

Shipping and Handling: S2 per book US; S4 
Canada; S6 foreign. 

Total Endosed 



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Orders wll be shipped wa UPS Ground Service. Offer good 
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MAirgicG 




REVIEWS 



and Louie climb mountains, explore 
caves, and make their way through 
the jungle. Watch your step — a multi- 
tude of dangers await you in your 
quest for gold and adventure. Disney 
Software deser\^es credit for its great 
sound and graphics. This game offers 
one of the best implementations of 
Tandy's 1 6-color graphics Fve ever 
seen. 

MIKE HUDNALL 



[BM PC and compatibles, 51 2K RAM, 
CGA. EGA, or VGA; two disk drives and 
joystick recommended, no on-disk copy 
protection— S44.95 

WALT DtSNEY COMPUTER SOFTWARE 

500 S. Buena Vista St. 

Burbank,CA 91521 

(818)972-3440 

S44.95 



Rl UFS OF STEEl 

Ho doubt about it— this is the 
straight stuff for any arcade junk- 
ie with the hockey Jones, As a 
straight port from its Nintendo 
videogame cousin, Blades of Si eel is 
long on stick reflexes and short on 
strategy. It*s skate, skate, slap shot, 
skate, skate. 

Thai's not all bad, if that's as far 
as you want to take computer hockey 
or if you want to experimcnl first 
before jumping into a full-blown sim- 
ulation. There's plenty of five-on-five 
action here, and since you also control 
the goalie, you must think quickly and 
act faster to get points on the board 
and to keep your opponent from 
scoring. 

Play against either the computer 
or a friend. The game will work with 
keyboard commands, but you're a 
sucker if you use anything but a joy- 
stick. Your control of the player fol- 
lows whatever direction you move 
your joystick. Passing and shooting 
are fine arts; shooting is the most diffi- 
cult because you must aim at a red 
mark that moves back and forth on 
the goal, awaiting the time that it gets 
into a clear position and you have a 
chance to get the puck past the goalie. 

On defense, you can tn^ to steal 
the puck by taking it away from the 
offensive player or by intercepting a 
pass. When the ball gets close to the 
goal, you must defend the net by mov- 
ing the goalie back and forth. Blocking 



one shot isn't usually too tough, but if 
your opponent gets two or three tries, 
you can just about mark it down. 

Blades of Steel offers two modes 
of play. Exhibition and Tournament, 
and three skill levels. These options 
enhance the playability of the game 
but do not make it a true simulation. 
All players are equal in ability, and 
you have no coaching options. Still, if 
your idea of fun is a lOO-mph slap 
shot across thirty feet of ice, this game 
has all you need. 





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Hockey action is yours in Blades ofSteeL 

Because of its arcade orientation. 
Blades of Steel sacrifices realism for 
action. However, fights and penalties 
do play a role, as they do in real hock- 
ey. If two players do get into a brawl, 
the game switches to a fight screen. 
You can actually control the fighting, 
throwing punches at your opponent. 
If the ref thinks things have gotten out 
of hand, he will award one of the 
teams a penalty shot — a one-on-one 
match-up between you and the goalie 
or, if you're on the short end of the 
stick, between you and the shooter. 

Blades of St eel supports Hercules, 
CGA, EG.A, and Tandy 1 6-color 
graphics but is unspectacular in any of 
these modes. The graphics are enough 
for you to enjoy the action but not so 
splendid as to interfere with your 
shooting. 

Sound is limited to the internal 
PC speaker and includes a few digi- 
tized voiceovers that sound quite 
realistic. 

Although you can't edit teams or 
compile stats on individual players. 
Blades of Steel does have one interest- 
ing feature not found in some of its 
competitors. If the referee awards one 
of the teams a penalty shot, you move 
to the penalty-shot screen. If you're on 
the receiving end, you must defend 
against a free shot by one of your op- 
ponent's best slap-shot artists. If the 



penalty is against the other team, it's 
your turn to burn one into the net. 
The free shot does play a role in hock- 
ey, so it's good to see it incorporated 
here. 

Keep these tips in mind as you 
play. In defensive pro mode, you 
should watch for a computer player 
camped near your goal. He will knock 
in your deflected save if you don't 
keep him covered. To initiate a fight 
sequence, bump the opponent head- 
on, wiggle the joystick, and press both 
fire buttons quickly. Fight sequences 
will be activated more often by the 
boards than in the center of the ice. 
During the face-off, click the passing 
button rapidly while pointing the joy- 
stick left before the ref throws out the 
puck. This will better your chances of 
winning the face-off and controlling 
the puck early. 

Blades of Steel for the home com- 
puter was programmed as a conver- 
sion of the highly successful Nintendo 
version of the same name. The game is 
designed for the novice sports gamer. 
PETER scisco 



IBM PC and compatibles; 384K RAM for 
CGA or Hercules. 51 2K RAM for EGA, 
640K RAM for Tandy 16-CObr; joystick 
recommended — $1 9.95 

KONAMI 

900 Deerfield Pkwy. 

Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 

(708)215-5111 



JOE MONIRNA 
FODTBALl 

The 49ers might not have made it 
to the Super Bowl this year, but 
there's no stopping this game 
from scoring big at any PG sports 
gamer's house. This is without a 
doubt the best version of football to 
come to the PC, with superb graphics 
and animation, a well-designed and 
easily learned interface, a wealth of 
editing functions (including individ- 
ual player stats as well as league func- 
tions), and an endorsement by one of 
the greatest quarterbacks ever to play 
the game. 

Joe Montana Football is com- 
prised of 28 teams, all from cities that 
boast an NFL franchise (no team 
names, just the cities). You can play 



142 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




REVIEWS 



an exhibition match or an entire sea- 
son while coaching a team, or you can 
let the computer call the plays while 
you watch. Taking a professional foot- 
ball team through a season on a 
march toward Super Sunday is cap- 
tured here in all of its essence, with 
the setbacks, the celebrations, and the 
drama that make up the game of 
football. 

Before you jump right into a 
game, however, you'd better familiar- 
ize yourself with the game's controls. 
You can do that with two practice 
modes, one for passing/running, the 
other for kicking field goals. The kick- 
ing game is the easiest to grasp. After 
the snap of the ball, you must press 
the fire button at the proper place 
along an accuracy meter that is dis- 
played at the bottom of the screen. 
You can direct your kick against the 
wind, or you can angle it toward the 
sideline by moving your joystick han- 
dle forward or back (the keyboard 
works, too). 



Running is also simple. All you 
have to do is take the snap from the 
quarterback and then direct your play- 
er toward the gaps in the defense. 

You may fmd some running 
plays work well and then be frustrated 
when the defense seems to "get 
smart" to your plans. That's all a part 
of the game^and an engaging piece of 
realism. 

Passing is the toughest part of the 
game to master. After you take the 
snap, you can cycle through the eligi- 
ble receivers, then press a button to 
release the ball. You must learn to do 
this in a matter of seconds, or the de- 
fensive linemen will have you chew- 
ing turf 

Only by practicing can you gain 
the skills you need. And even then 
you'll want to play a few exhibition 
games to try out your new-found tal- 
ents before engaging in a full-blown 
season. 

Everything about this game, from 
its presentation to its sound effects, 



puts a premium on bringing the real- 
ism of football to the PC. The plays 
are professionally drawn (you can de- 
sign your own) and realistically exe- 
cuted. The playing perspective during 
most of the game resembles what you 
would see on television; during field 
goals and extra points you have a 
view of the defensive line and the up- 
rights from behind the kicker— a view 
not many PC game players have expe- 
rienced in real life. 

Realistic animation, coupled 
with the grunts, pops, cracks, and 
thunder of 300-pound linemen crash- 
ing into one another, create an illusion 
of an interactive sporting event hap- 
pening right on your small PC screen. 

Also contributing to the effect are 
injuries, substitutions, and full player 
rosters. The weather doesn't really 
play a role, and penalties are limited 
to two: Pass Interference and Delay of 
Game, (The documentation lists three 
but includes Safety, which is, of 
course, a score, not a penalty). Fum- 



BUY BETTER— SCORE HIGHER 

with COMPUTE'S 
Guide to Sega Genesis 

The author of the best-selhng COMPUTEVs Guide to Nintendo 
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COMPUTE 143 




HFRE lOONUM FOR 

ElflDEHaOF 

IHIEUMEin UFE. 

If you have evidence of intelligence test scores 
which put you in the top 2% of the population— for 
example, 1250 or better on the SAP— then you already 
qualify to join Mensa. We also accept the GRE (1250), 
Miller Analogies (66), Stanford Binet (132) and other 
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Send to MENSA, Dept, CP51, 2626 East 14th Street, Brooklyn. NV 11235-3992 

■ • 1300, if you took the test prior to September 1977 ■ 



Circle Reader Service Number 141 



REVIEWS 



bles, interceptions, and lost opportu- 
nities round out the many pieces that 
go into creating an extremely realistic 
simulation. 

With full color graphics support 
(from CGA to VGA), Joe Montana 
Football looks as good as it plays. The 
scrolling screen always keeps you in 
the middle of the action, whether 
you're covering a punt or throwing 
long on a post pattern. The onscreen 
characters are fun to watch even after 
the whistle is blown, when they con- 
tinue to push and shove each other 
until called to the huddle. My only 
small quibble is that the team uni- 
forms aren't a match for their real-life 
counterparts. (Chicago wearing Mi- 
ami blue? Cincinnati in gold and 
black?) 

The sound support for this game 
is also excellent, with full attention 
paid to the Sound Blaster, Game 
Blaster, and MT'32 sound cards. The 
music is a kind of never-ending trum- 
pet fanfare that eventually grows tire- 
some, but the sound effects add a 
dimension to the game that shouldn't 
be missed. ^ 



Advertisers Index 



Reader Service Number/Advertiser Page Reader Service Number/Advertiser Page 



173 Aamiga Warehouse A-31 

134 Access Software - 1 14, 1 15 

178 Accolade 103 

214AdUb IBC 

Art Insights Galfery 139 

Broderburvd 111 

206 Cedar Software . 154 

140 Citizen American Corporation 37 

161 Compsutt G'23 

175 Compsult .... ....,...,.., A-29 

103 CompuServe 7 

167 Computer Book Club 17 

230 Computer Business Services Inc 1 54 

114 Computer Direct 89 

138 Computers Rrst 39 

185 Computer Games -f A-15 

129 Covox ... 93 

137COVOX 155 

157 Creative Micro Designs G-2. G-3 

120 DCS Industries - - 79 

176 Delphi 76 

131 DemoSource 1 54 

199 Direct Unk 91 

192 Free Sp<ri1 A-3 

111 Future Trends 106 

205 GEnie 47 

118 Gentry Software 157 

152 Geo\Atori<s iFC, 1 

197 Gladstone A-SO 

198 Gold Hill 63 

1 74 The Grapevine Group .............. A-27 

1 65 The Grapevine Group G-1 6 

Hair Dynasty for Men .............. 121 

Historical Simulations 148, 149 

1. Den Videotronics A-23 

256 ICD A-5 

184 IHT Software G-16 

106 international Toner Cartridge 156 



135 Interplay 112 

136 Interplay 117 

216 Jason-Ranheim G-17 

115 John Dunn Associates 1 56 

183 Lucky Computer Company 155 

Magalog , 136, 137 

1 39 Maxximum Company 1 52 

141 Mensa IQ Society 144 

1 97 MicroProse . .... 9 

Mitsubishi 3 

Montgomery Grant A*7, G-5 

National Public Radb 15 

New Artists Ltd 23 

153 New World Computing 19 

Newtmdge Communications Inc. 27 

143 Nordic Track 59 

177 NRI/McGraw-Hill Schools 49 

180 Origin Systems . . 13 

204 Panasonic .......... ... .... 5 

108 Parsons , 11 

258 P.A.V.Y. Software G-23 

105 PC Enterprises 156 

ProfessionaJ Cassette Center 94. 95 

151 Professor Jones 152 

168 Psygnosis 25 

104 Radio Shack 44, 45 

221 Ramco Computer Supplies 156 

203 Rent-A'Disk .A-29 

Schnedler Systems G-15 

116 Sexxy Software 157 

195 Sien-a OnUne BC 

257 Sir-Tech 107 

109 Smart Luck Software . . ..... 154 

200 SNK Home Entertainment 109 

126 Softshoppe 157 

163 Software Excitement . A-13 

241 Software of the Month Club 155 

SOGWAP G-21 



Reader Service Number/Advertiser Page 

130 Starware Publishing Corporation 154 

Supra Corporation 61 

259 Tektontcs G-21 

170 Tenex G-ll 

132 The Other Guys A-21 

123 The Soft Group , , G-13 

179 USA Mk;ro 153 

142 Wallace Electronics inc 156 

172 Wbdgwood Computers A-31 

184 WOL National Learning Systems 87 

193 WritePro 154 



1990 Gazette Index G^9 

Amiga Resource Subscription 93 

Amiga Single Disk Order A-20 

Amiga Utilities Disk , A-31 

Best PC Games Disk 133 

COMPUTE Books 53.55,123,141,143,147. 
157, A-27. G-1 7. G-21 

COf^PUTE Subscription 97 

COMPUTE'S SharePak Disk 29 

Entertainment Software Showcase 119 

Gazette Disk Library G-7 

Gazette Disk Subscription G-10 

Gazette PowerPak ....... . . 157, G-19 

Mean 18 Golf Course . . ..... 127 

OMNI Subscription '. 97 

PC Disk Subscription , 57 

PC Productivity PowerPak 83 

SpeedScript Disk G-39 

Tutor Toys and Math \%ager 101 



144 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




REVIEWS 



Aside from team editing and 
league play, Joe Montana Football 
brings its own method of instam re- 
play to PC football. Each play is re- 
corded as it happens; you have the 
option of seeing an instant replay 
from the field or of saving the replay 
on an option screen. 

If you save from the option 
screen, you have the capability of 
splicing together several replays to 
create your own "game highlights" 
film. 

Another special feature is what 
Sega calls its Receiver Cam, This fea- 
ture allows you to check off your re- 
ceivers during pass plays. Football 
games that incorporate action as part 
of their design have always had trou- 
ble dealing with the multiple receivers 
that pro quarterbacks routinely use; 
the Receiver Cam feature is a unique 
way of solving that problem, by pre- 
senting a small window in the corner 
of the screen that highlights each re- 
ceiver as you tog^e through the possi- 
bilities. You still have to keep an eye 
on the pass rush, but this method is 
less intrusive than those employed by 
most PC football games. 

Don't drop the ball on this one. 
With its superb blending of action and 
strategy and its use of stats and reflex- 
es, it's bound to go down as one of the 
best sports simulations ever to hit the 
field. And even if you never play as 
well as Joe Montana, this game will 
just about make you think you could, 

PETER SCISOO 



IBM PC and compatibles, 51 2K RAM 
(640K for optima? performance), CGA, 
EGA, MCGA. VGA, or Tandy IB-colon 
hard disk and joystick recommended*— 
$49.95 

SEGA 

573 Forbes Btvd. 

South San Francisco, CA 94080 



GALIEONS OF 



agellan never completed his 
quest for glory, honor, and 
gold; he was killed by Philip- 
pine tribesmen while still thou- 
sands of miles from home. Galleons of 
Glory^ re-creates his sixteenth-century 
voyage from Spain to the coast of 



South America and shows you what it 
was Uke to be an admiral setting sail 
for the unknown during the Age of 
Discovery. 

Galleons also teaches managerial 
skills. To acquire gold and glory, you 
must equip and maintain your ship, 
keep your crew in line, weigh the 
opinions of your officers, deal with 
adverse weather and sea conditions^ 
and explore unmapped coastline. As 
you gather information and issue or- 
ders to your captain, navigator, and 
other officers, you must keep track of 
provisions, maintain morale, and 
watch for signs of discontent. Lose 
touch with your crew, and a traitorous 
officer will organize a mutiny. Unless 
you can discover who is leading the 
rebellion, you'll be marooned on 
shore, falHng to your knees in despair 
as your ship sails on without you. Mu- 
tinies are less likely if you locate trea- 
sure and extract it with minimum 
casualties from the natives you meet. 

This game is more challenging 
than Br0derbund's Carmen Sandiego 
series, but it should appeal to much 
the same audience. The interface is 
very easy to master, and the graphics 
are well done, especially in VGA. A 
few things are slightly off about Galle- 
ons of Glory, though. Play can be re- 
petitive. With such a small cast of 
characters, players will find them- 
selves hopping frequently between 
cabin and galley, longing for a change 
of scene (much like real sailors, I sup- 
pose). Younger players will probably 
find it impossible to guess the leader 
of the mutineers, so their games will 
never progress very far. 

Some of the less palatable aspects 
of Magellan's voyages are glossed over 
in Galleons. Mention is made of 
wormy biscuits, but you don't expe- 
rience the extreme hardships that the 
crew suffered (at one point Magellan's 
men were reduced to eating boiled 
leather). The natives with whom you 
trade or fight are offensive stereotypi- 
cal caricatures bearing little resem- 
blance to the South American coastal 
peoples that Magellan and other ex- 
plorers actually met — and often en- 
slaved or killed. 

Interestingly, conversion of the 
natives to Christianity is not one of 
the onshore menu options, although 
that was one of the main goals of Ma- 
gellan's expedition and ultimately 
proved to be his undoing. Nor do you 



get a sense of what drove Magellan 
personally — his religious zeal, the 
Spanish desire for world domination, 
the rivalry between the Portuguese 
Magellan and his Spanish captains. 
Still, if you are intrigued by the 
exploits of "so noble a captain," as 
Magellan's chronicler Antonio Piga- 
fetta called him, take the helm. Galle- 
ons of Glory proves to be quite a 
seaworthy simulation. 

STEVEN ANZOVIN 



IBM PC and compatibles, 51 2K RAM, 
CGA, EGA, VGA, Hercules, Tandy 16- 
co!or; supports Ad Lib, Digrtal, Sound 
Biaster, and Tandy S-voice sound— 
S44.95 

BR0DERBUND 

17 Paul Dr. 

San Rafael, CA 94903 

(415)492-3200 



BIAGK GOID 

V V ou*re drilling for oil. Sound bor- 
U ing? Not if youVe playing Black 
■ Gold from Rainbow Arts. This 
I game challenges you to become 
an oil magnate and run successful oil 
recovery and processing plants all 
over the world. Black Gold's strong 
points include a logical interface and 
playable arcade sequences, but the 
game needs some work on graphics 
and sound. Most scenes, excluding the 
arcade sequences, are in drab colors, 
and sounds are almost nonexistent. 
Despite these complaints, the game's 
combination of action and strategy is 
engaging and kept me preoccupied 
even during a time of rising oil and 
gasoline prices. 

RUSSCECCOLA 



IBM PC and compatibles, 640K RAM, 

CGA, EGA, or VGA— $49.95 

Also available for Amiga — $39.95, Atari 

ST— $39.95, and Commodore 64/1 28— 

$24.95 

RAINBOW ARTS 
Distributed by Electronic Zoo 
3431'A Benson Ave. 
Baltimore, MD 21227 
(301)646-5031 



This publication is available 

in microform from University ^■ 

Microfilms International. 

OiU loMree 600-521-3544, Or mail inquiry tO: 
Universitv Microfilms International. 300 North 
Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor. MI 48106. 




MAY 19 91 COMPUTE 14S 




REVIEWS 



COUNTDOWN 

Anyone familiar with the PC ad- 
venture-game scene knows that 
every new entry is the most ex- 
citing, most appealing, most 
realistic game ever. Now, from Ac- 
cess Software, there's an adventure 
that may send you in search of new 
superlatives. It's called Countdown, 
and it's great! 

Countdown starts with a mystery. 
You're Mason Powers, American 
agent, held in a Turkish prison hospi- 
tal. There's something about a mur- 
der .. . somebody named Frank 
McBain ... the CIA ... the phrase 96 
hours to save the world. You really 
have no idea what's going on, thanks 
to a bad case of amnesia, but that's 
part of the fun. Mysteries are best 
unraveled alone. 

Countdown is billed as an interac- 
tive movie, and it defmitely has im- 
pressive moves. Some you make 
yourself; some debut in automatic an- 
imated sequences. All of the plot de- 
velops on the game's fantastic 256- 
color VGA graphics screens, which 
are undeniably first-rate. 

But there's more here than a lot 
of pretty pictures. Countdown has a 
strong interactive element, too. A key 
game component is searching — easy 
to do thanks to a straightforward in- 
terface. To check out an object, sim- 
ply peg it with the crosshairs and click 
on the desired action (LOOK, OPEN, 
and so on). Now and then you'll pick 
up something that triggers an animat- 
ed onscreen flashback. Pay careful at- 
tention. There may be valuable 
information in those tattered shreds 
of memory. 

Next to careful searching, careful 
conversation is key. Countdown's 
characters are a chatty lot, but you've 
got to get them talking first. Some can 
be bluffed or hassled into helping you; 
others respond better if you're pleas- 
ant or sincere. You set the tone with 
the push of a button, choosing from 
an onscreen list of options. Choosing 
the right tone can determine whether 
you get much-needed information or 
a nasty insult and a door in your face. 
Oh, yes— an offer of cold, hard cash 
may help out, too. 

If you keep at it, you'll eventually 
escape from your cell. After exploring 
lots of rooms and conducting lots of 



conversations, you may even find 
your way out of the asylum. Thai's 
when you'll recover your handyKiandy 
CAD (spy talk for Computer Access 
Device). It slices, dices, and puts you 
in direct contact with the CIA com- 
puter at Langiey, Virginia. This gives 
you vital access to background infor- 
mation and lets you do detective-style 
analysis, too. It even accepts E-mail, 
which other characters will send you 
from time to time. 



^^^^■■Ri' .^wtm 


Wm 



Save the worfd from destruction and re- 
gain your memory in Countdown. 

Make it this far, and soon you're 
on the road. New destinations (rang- 
ing from McBain's apartment to Cairo 
and Jerusalem) will become available 
as you discover them, and the travel 
screen lets you visit them by train or 
by air. Train trips are cheaper, but air 
is faster. Your choice will depend on 
your resources and on how much time 
is left. 

Throughout Countdown, you'll 
appreciate the program's broad-based 
approach to sound. It features digi- 
tized sound effects, music, and speech 
and even offers synchronized voice 
and sound. It supports Ad Lib, CO- 
VOX, and PS/2 Sound Adapter cards, 
as well as the Sound Blaster. But even 
if you have no sound card, better- 
than-average sound is available (on 
machines running at a 6 MHz or 
more) thanks to Countdown's use of 
the RealSbund system. This patented 
technology allows your MS-DOS ma- 
chine to reproduce high-quality digi- 
tized sounds without any additional 
hardware. It works, too, although ac- 
tual sound quality will be affected by 
the quality of your PC's speaker and 
to some extent by your clock speed. 
The results, while far from sound-card 
quality, are nonetheless a big im- 
provement over what you'd get other- 
wise. Countdown also offers a no- 



sound option, handy should you 
decide to go adventuring during those 
slack times at the office. 

Countdown is a massive pro- 
gram, but hard disk installation is al- 
most automatic. Be sure, though, that 
when you shop for a copy, you pick 
up the package with disks in your ma- 
chine's format. 

Challenging without being ob- 
scure, entertaining without being trite, 
and realistic without being tedious, 
Countdown is what every adventure 
game should be. There's even a num- 
ber to call for help in case you reach 
what seems like a dead end. And with 
world-class graphics, Countdown may 
be the best reason yet to buy yourself 
a VGA board! 

STEVE HUDSON 



IBM PC and compatibles, 640K RAM, 
VGA: hard disk and 8 MHz or faster CPU 
recommended, supports major sound 
cards and mouse or {oystick — $59.95 

ACCESS SOI=TWARE 
4910 W. Ameiia Earhart Dr. 
Sail Uke City. UT 84116 
(8O0)8OCM88O 

ASTRONOMY LAD 

Heed a Httle help with your astron- 
omy homework? Astronomy Lab 
mi^t be ideal. Its outstanding 
features include two-dimensional 
charts, animations, and reports or al- 
manac printouts of astronomical 
events. The charts include common 
solar, lunar, and planetary events; or- 
bital data for Jupiter's Galilean 
moons; and diurnal information for 
the user-specified viewing location 
from earth. 

Animations illustrate the above 
topics. All scenes are calculated on the 
fly; a fast microprocessor or a math 
coprocessor will make the effect less 
like a slide show and more like a mov- 
ie. Animation speed aside, Astronomy 
Lab deserves a look before you begin 
to stare into space. 

BRUCE BOWDEN 



IBIVI PC and compatibles, 51 2K RAM, 
EGA or VGA; supports Epson, PostScript, 
and HP Laserjet printers^$59.95 

PERSONAL MICROCOSIVIS 
8547 E. Arapahoe Rd., Ste. J-147 
Greenwood Village, CO 8011 2 
(303)753-3268 



14€ COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 



2 Books 15 Bucks 



40 Great Flight Simulator Adventures (C022X} 

40 More Great Flight Simulator Adventures (C0432J 

Flying on Instruments with Flight Simulator (C0912) 

Jet Fighter School (C0920) 

Learning to Fly with Flight Simulator (C1153) 

The Electronic Battlefield (C117X) 

Sub Commander Tactics and Strategy for WWII Submarine 
Simulayons(C1277) 

Gunship Academy: Tactics and Maneuvers for Attack Heli- 
copter Simulations (C1536) 

Realistic Commercial Flying with Flight Simulator (C1692) 

40 Great Submarine Simulator War Adventures (C1722) 

Order your copies today. Minimum 2 books per order. Shipping 

and handling $1 per book ($5.00 for orders outside U.S. and 

Canada). 

Send check or money order (in U.S. funds only) and appropriate 

sales tax (if you live in NO, NJ, and NY). Canadian orders add 

7% goods and services tax. Mail to: 

COMPUTE Books 
c/o CCC 

2500 McClellan Ave, 
Pennsauken, NJ 08109 

Please include ISBN number on your check or money order. 

Offer good only while supplies last. 

Please allow four to six weeks for delivery. MAY91 CP2 




from 

COMPUTE 

The Official Book of King's Quest, 
Second Edition 

Covers King's Quest l-V 

Here's the updated, authorized guide to King's 
Quest, America's most popular series of 5-D ani- 
mated adventure games. In no time, you'll puzzle 
out the answers to some of the most nagging 
enigmas of this series of best-selling games. 
including the latest version. King's Quest V. 

To Order send $12.95 plus $2 shipping and handling for each 
book ($4 Canada, $6 foreign) and applicable tax* tO; 

COMPUTE Books 
c/o CCC 

2500 McClellan Ave. 
Pennsauken, NJ 08109 

•Residents of NC, NJ, and NY add appropriate sales tax, Canadian 

orders please add 7% Goods and Services tax. 

All orders must be paid in U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. bank. Please 

allow four to six weeks for delivery. 

Offer good while supplies last. 

IWW91C04 



LES NIMILEY IN: 





THE KING 



AS Les Manley, hapless flunky at a 
TV station, you're caught up in a 
search for a personality known 
as "the king" to win a million- 
dollar prize. To succeed, youMl need 
to find clues, solve puzzles, and collect 
items. Great VGA graphics, twisted 
humor, and sight gags make up for the 
thin story line and some overly ob- 
scure puzzles. Accolade's commit- 
ment to animated adventure gaming 
is evident in the help you can get from 
its bulletin board, clue book» and hint 
line. 

WARREN QUINLAN 




IBM PC and compatibles, 640K RAM, 
GGA, EGA, MCGA. VGA, arid Tandy 16- 
color; S-MHz system recommended — 
$59.95 

ACCOLADE 

550 S. Winchester Blvd. 

San Jose. CA 95128 

(408)296-8400 



Everyone needs help with DOS. If 
the simplest MS-DOS command 
befuddles you, or if you're an in- 
termediate user out to achieve ex- 
pert status, you'll find Professor DOS 
an instructive and efficient learning 
tool. In addition, the program's ac- 
companying SmartGuidefor DOS 
should prove an invaluable memory- 
resident DOS reference guide. 

Featuring over 30 onscreen tuto- 
rials, Professor DOS covers a wide 
range of material. The first of seven 
sections includes lessons on the func- 
tion and history of DOS and on how 
to use the Professor DOSpiogrsLm. 
Sections 2 through 7 cover commonly 
used commands, hard disks, the DOS 
4.0 shell, batch files, advanced com- 
mands, and special tools. 

Use your keyboard to access all 
tutorials, and take advantage of the 



excellent onscreen index. 

Each lesson begins with a state- 
ment of objectives and ends with a 
summary. The program presents 
information in a straightforward fash- 
ion, with prompts that provide con- 
tinual assistance. Graphics enhance 
and clarify what you're being taught, 
and sound effects draw attention to 
specific concepts. 

Constant interaction between you 
and Professor DOS assures that you'll 
understand what you need to under- 
stand. The program helps you assess 
your knowledge and understanding of 
the material in a variety of ways. 
Quizzes come in many forms, includ- 
ing trueAalse, fill in the blank, and 
matching columns. 

As valuable as this program is, it 
does present a few very minor diffi- 
culties. If you take too long to reply to 
questions or give incorrect responses, 
the program displays the correct an- 
swer. Unfortunately, the answers pop 
up so quickly that some users may not 
get a chance to reply before the system 
gives the answer. 

Also, some information is 
phrased unclearly. Instead of indicat- 
ing that a period precedes the exten- 
sion of a DOS filename, the program 
suggests that the period is part of the 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 147 




THE MOST REMARKABLE 

Like all relaxations, you can put them down whenever you like. 

• Like all great passions, you won't be able to. 

• Like all great pleasures, they last for years. 

• Like life itself, they are a struggle of 
unparallelled scope and ardour. 

► They are enacted on a stage of breath-taking landscapes. 

• They dennand brutal intrigue 
and ruthless leadership. 

• Very soon all the vacancies 
will be gone. 




• Book your place now— 
and if you introduce a friend, 
you can start absolutely free. 




The Quebec Conference. From left to right, in the 
foreground: Mackenzie King, prime minister of 
Canada, Franklin Roosevelt and Winston Churchill, 



(t vva5 a desperate plight in which the 14th Regiment of the Line found itself, the French square harshly pressed. 



World War II, The Napoleonic Wars and Muskets & Mules 
are revolutionary play-by-mail wargames, reproducing with 
perfect historical accuracy the conflicts themselves. You 

play a key figure in the military-political heirarchy of a 
major power of the time. Each turn you will receive 
beautifully printed maps, on which the deployments of your 
proud subordinates or loyal troops are displayed. Each turn, 
you move your forces into strategic positions to frustrate 
your enemies or to support your allies within the game. 
Whether you are Napoleon Buonaparte, General George 
Patton, Adolf Hitler, or any one of countless others, you will 
be thrown into an unprecedented theatre of alternate 
history. In these unique and amazing interactive wargames, 
you direct the destiny of world history. 




British ships of the line after Nelson's triumph at Aboukir Bay. 



WARGAMES EVER CREATED 



WORLD WAR II 

THE NAPOLEONIC WARS 

and MUSKETS & MULES 

Productions of: Historical Simulations, Inc. 
WORLD WAR II 




In Wbr/d War il you are one man at the top of the military-polrtical 
heirarchy of a key power of the time and weave your own thread Into 
the collective creation of all players which Is the whole game. 
Whether you become General Rommel recently ordered to 
command of the Afnka Korps, Field Marshall Coring fibbing about 
the strength of the airforce or Adolf Hitler, fosef Stalin, President 
Trumam, Winston Churchill or whatever rote you don World War 11 
puts you into an unprecedented theatre of alternate history. 



THE NAPOLEONIC WARS 



Between 1798-1614 a straggle for world hegemony was waged. 
From Napoleon Buonaparte's decision to Invade Egypt, to 
Alexander /'s to champion Mecklenburg, the decision which led to 
the downfall oi Napoleon, the history of Eurasia twisted and turned. 
History could have diverged profoundly from its actual course. 
Nelson should have caught Napoleon en route to Egypt destroyed 
him and inadvertently preserved the Republic. Napo/eon should have 
triumphed In 1813. 

The tapestry of these struggles was dark to Its creators, Its final 
outcome obscure and inevitaoly the result of a panoply of individual 
efforts. For example, the French were undone in Spain by 
Napoleon's inabifit^' to personally supervise the campaign. 



MUSKETS & MULES 



A French hussar and a dragoon talk with their 
sentries posted nearby. 



During the years 1805-1810 a four-cornered struggle for hegemony 
raged over German and Italian speaking Europe. Empires rose and 
Empires fell. In the course of this epochal clash of powers the first 
French Empire under the Emperor Napoleon I broke the back of the 
Habsburg Empire, twice defeated the Empire of all the Russias and 
virtually dismembered the Kingdom of Prussia. 




STAR IN THE DEFINITIVE WARGAMES 

Fill in the coupon below or phone us at (914) 428-1990 to find out more. FAX: (914) 761-3042 

To: Historical Simulations, 99 Court Street White Plains, NY 10601 



$50 for rules, nnaterials and your first turn, please tick off the 
appropriate box and fill in the chart. Free start-up if you get 

SPECIAL OFFER ^Ign up for 3 turns ($60). ..Get Start-Up Materials FREE ($30 Savings) 



a friend to join. Call us to arrange. Please make checks 
payable to Historical Simulations, Inc. 



A turn takes place 

every 14 days 

and costs $20 per turn. 



Name 



Address 



Telephone number 



D WORLD WAR II 

Please number countries 
in order of preference: 

Greater Germany 

lUe Soviet Union (and the CCP) 

The British Empire 

The Japanese Empire . 

The United States of America . . 

The Italian Empire 

The French Republic 

Nationalist China . 

Other Power [e.g, Poland) 



(Uo2) 

Field Comnnander 



{Uo3) 
Army , . 

Strategic Commander Navy 

Political Leader Atr Force 



D THE NAPOLEONIC WARS 

Please number countries 
in order of preference: 

Republic of France ... 

Great Britian , 

The Habsburg Monarchy _._.... 

The Empire of 

all the Russias , 



The Kingdom of Prussia , 
The Ottoman Empire . . . 
Other Power (e.g. Spain) 



n to 2) 

Field Commander 

Strategic/Political 
Commander . . , . 



two 2) 
Army 

Navy 



D MUSKETS & MULES 

Please number countries 
in order of preference: 
iUo3] 

French 



Austrian 
Russian . , 
Prussian 



C-5 



© 1989 

Historical Simuldlions, Inc. 

99 Court Street 

White Plains, New Yofk 10601 




REVIEWS 



extension: 'The extension can be up 
to 3 characters long and includes the 
period."). It would Ve been better to 
refer to the period as a separator be- 
tween the filename and the DOS ex- 
tension, which can be associated with 
applications in later versions of the 
operating system. 




Learn advanced DOS commands by 
taking the professor's class. 

The Professor's worthy compan- 
ion — SmartGuide for DOS— may op- 
erate solo or work inside another 
program. With the stroke of a key, 
SmartGuide provides useful infor- 
mation about numerous DOS com- 
mands. Facts pertaining to other DOS 
topics, tips for users^ and special ta- 
bles (ASCII codes, for example) are 
available as well. 

SmartGuide functions not only as 
a memory-resident reference tool but 
also as a timesaver. From the Utilities 
option, you may create a menu of 
your 15 most-used DOS commands. 
One keystroke will transport them to 
SmariGuides line editor, and pressing 
Enter will send them to DOS to be 
executed. 

Both programs are very easy to 
use, thanks to the expert design of the 
menus, the excellent tutorials, and the 
concise 31 -page manual Ease of use 
combined with solid educational and 
practical value make Professor DOS 
and SmartGuide for DOS musts for 
the perplexed beginner, the curious in- 
termediate, and the would-be expert. 

LEN POGGiALl 



IBM PC and compatibles— $49.95 

INDIVIDUAL SOFTWARE 
125 Shoreway Rd., Ste. 3000 
San Carlos, CA 94070-2704 
(800) 331 -3313 (outside CA) 
(800) 870-2042 (insfdeCA) 
(41 5} 595-8855 (Bay Area) 




We finally got these brothers 
on speaking terms. 



Jordan or Cousy? Canseco or DiMaggio? 
They don't always agree. But now they're talking. 

When they were growing up, one brother 
was deaf and the oQier never learned to sign. 
Now with the help of Easter Seals 
they're making up for lost time. 

Support Easter Seals. 

Give the power 

to overcome. 




^Easier 
Seals 



150 COMPUTE MAY 1991 




REVIEWS 



PICTIONARY 

The transition from the labletop to 
the desktop isn't always a smooth 
one, but the PC version of Piction- 
ary does a remarkable job of cap- 
turing the frenzied drawing, wild 
guessing, and leap-from-your-chair 
gymnastics that the board game in- 
spires. Not only that, but it serves as 
an excellent introduction to computer 
draw and paint programs. 

Pictionary for the PC can be 
played by two to four teams or by one 
to four individual players. The pic- 
turer (the person who does the draw- 
ing) is determined by the play format 




Draw on your parlor game skills. 

you select. If you have two or more 
people on a team, a member of each 
team draws the picture on the screen. 
A word card reference number ap- 
pears on the screen, and the picturer 
uses it to look up the word to be 
drawn. 

Drawings are created onscreen 
using your mouse or joystick and an 
array of drawing tools. If necessary, 
you can use the cursor keys, but I 
don't recommend it. An option for 
practicing your drawing skills will 
help before the serious competition 
begins. 

Teams have one, two, or three 
minutes to guess the word that the 
picture represents. Dual onscreen 
clocks (one digital, one analog) keep 
track of remaining lime. If you or 
your team guesses correctly, then a 
small die is rolled toward the center of 
the screen. The computer moves your 
piece forward the indicated number of 
spaces, and then it's time for the next 
turn. 

Pictionary 's biggest limits are the 
size of the teams and the size of the 
screen. There's a practical limit to the 



number of people you can crowd 
around a computer monitor. For small- 
er gatherings, it might work; but for 
large groups, it will prove frustrating. 

You can play the game with the 
computer drawing the pictures and 
with you and a friend trying to guess 
what the picture is. Unfortunately, 
you only get one guess, which ehmi- 
nates a lot of the excitement found in 
the board version. A better design 
would have allowed you to type in an- 
swers as the picture drawing pro- 
gresses, rather than halting the action 
and making a single guess. 

Despite this limitation, the com- 
puter is a remarkably human artist. 
It's fun to watch it draw pictures of 
varying skill and sophistication. And 
while the game lacks some of the 
board version's sizzle, it's nonetheless 
an engaging diversion. Board game 
purists will find it an interesting addi- 
tion to their game shelf 

STEVE HUDSON 



IBM PC and compatibles (mouse or joy- 
stick recommended) — $39.95 
Also available for the Amiga ($39.95) and 
C64/128(S29,95) 

DOMARK 

Distributed by Braderbund 

17 Paul Dr. 

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(415)492^200 



MICKEY'S 




PUZZLE MAKER 



Here's a sneaky way to get kids to 
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Kids can also choose words, 
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Kids can learn and have fun, too, with 
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to develop the creativity to make puz- 
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the strategy to win, 

EDDIE HUFFMAN 



IBM PC and compatibles: 51 2K; CGA, 
EGA, or Tandy 1 6-cotor; printer; mouse 

optional— $44.95 

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500 S. Buena Vista St, 
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(818)972-3440 



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STORYTELLER 



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If you enable the program's 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 



151 



COMPUTE'S Product Mart 

is a special advertising section designed to benefit you. the PC direct mar- 
keter, by letting you advertise directly to tlie readers that buy. We offer: 



^ Marketing Assistance 

Eacii ad receives a complementary 
reader service number tliat generates 
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Qualified Readers 

Our readers search the Product IVIart 
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Guaranteed Audience 

Our rate base is guaranteed at 
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Cost Effectiveness 

Ad sizes range from 1/9 (2V4 x 3V4) to 
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Space closing: First day of the second month preceeding issue date (for example, November 
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East Coast & Midwest 

Caroline Hanlon 
(919)275-9809 



For ad specifications or more information call 
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Circle Reader Service Number 121 



Circle Reader Service Number 139 



The Sensational Lasers 

MLASEnTTURBOXT MLASER 286/2X MLASER 386SX 



• 6088-1 10MHz Pfocessor 

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• 40MB Hard Drive (Optional) 

• 101 Enhanced Keyboard 

« MS/DOS^DOS SheIhGWBasic 

• 12" Monitor w/Tllt & Swivel 

• Serial/ Parallel & Game Ports 

• Real Time Clock w/ Battery 

• CGA/TTL Graphics Card 

• Eight Expansion Slots 

• Fully IBM Compatible 

• One Year Warranty 

SALE PHICE S 699.00 

w/RGB $ 849.00 
W/VGA $ 965.00 

no HDD S 465.00 

40MB Option $ 75.00 



$699 

"""He 



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• Intel 80266 12MHz Processor "0" Wail State 

• 1MB RAM Expands to 8MB 

• 1.2MB Floppy Dnve 

• 40MB Hard Drive (Seagate) 28MS 

• 101 Enhanced Keyboard 

• 12" Monitor w/Hlt & Swivel 

• Parallel & {2) Serial Ports 
« 1:1 Interleave HDD/FDD 

• Real Time Clock w/ Battery 

• CGA/TTL Graphics Card 

• 7 Expansion Sots 

• MS/DOS+DOS Shell +GWBa»lc 

• Fully IBM Compatible 

• Norton SI 1 5 3 

• One Year Warranty 

SALE PRICE S 899.00 

w/RGB $1049.00 
W/VGA $1185.00 

no HDD $ 599.00 

65MB Option S 125.00 



^% 



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'B 



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• Intel 80386SX I6MH2 Processor ■0" Wait State 

• 1MB RAM Expands 8MB 

• 1,2 MB Floppy Drive 

• 40MB Hard Drive (Seagate) 2eMS 

• 101 Enhanced Keyboard 

• 12" Monitor w/Tllt & Swivel 

• Parallel & (2) Serial Ports 

• 1:1 Interteave HDD/FDD 

• Real Time Clock w/Battery 

• CGA/TTL Graphics Card 

• 7 Expansion Slots 

• MS/DOS+DOS 
Shell -GWBasIc 

• Fully DOS, Unix & OS/2 
Compatible 

• Norton SI 1 8.6 

• One Year Warranty 

SALE PRICE $1199.00 

w/RGB $1349.00 
W/VGA $1485.00 

no HDD S 
65MB Option $ 



$1199 




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Tlie Laser 1 28 ' features futt Apple® 1 1 compatibility wi th an interrtal disk (Jrive, serial, paraltel, modem, a nd mouse 
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The LASER 128EX has all the features of the 
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DISK DRIVES 

* 5.25 LASER/Appfe 11c ..$ 99.00 

* 5.25Appfe lie , $ 99.00 

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* 3,50 LASER Daisy Chain <^J^ $179,00 



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ACCESSORIES 

* 14" RGB Color f^onitor , $229.00 

* LASER 190E Printer $209,00 

■ LASER 145E Printer $179,00 

* Mouse $ 49.00 

* Joystick (3) Button $ 29,00 

* UDC Card $ 49.00 



ACCESSORIES 



■ 12" Monitor TTL w/T&S Amber 

■ 14" Monitor TTL w/T&S PaperWhite 

■ 14" Monitor RGB w/T&S 640x240 

■ 14" Monitor SVGA w/T&S 1024x768 

■ CHINON 5,25 FDD 360KB 

■ CHINON 3.5 FDD 720KB 

■ CHINON 5.25 FDD 1.20MB 

■ CHINON 3.5 FDD 1.44MB 

' OAK Super VGA Graphics Card w/256K 
' LASER 3/t Graphics Card (TTL, CGA) 
' LASER Mouse (3} Button w/Dnver SW 
' LASER Joystick (3) Button Self Center 
' LASER Interna! Modem 2400 Baud (Auto) 

■ LASER XT. 286, 386 Technical Manuals 
' LASER MULTI I/O SPFGC (XT) 

' LASER MULTI I/O P+(2)S (AT) 
' Parallel & Serial Cables 
• 3.5MB RAM Card OK (AT) 
^ 8MB RAM Card OK (386) 
^ 10MB RAM Card OK (386SX) 
' LASER 145E 145 CPS IBM/ Epson 
' LASER 190E 190 CPS IBM/Epson 
» LASER 190 A 190 CPS Image writer 



S 89,00 

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29.00 

99.00 

25.00 

79,00 

65.00 

20.00 

60.00 

80.00 

90,00 

SI 79,00 

5209,00 

$238,00 



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circle Reader Service Number 179 



■ 



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Circle Reader Service Number 206 



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Circle Reader Service Number 109 




Circle Reader Service Number 131 



PC Box 340203 DiPt 12 
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40?"479 05e8 
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194 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




OMNI 
TIME CAPSULES 



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The 
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Harness the productivity power of your 

64 or 128! Tlirn your Commodore into a 
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generate reports in a snap, manage your 
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GemCalc 64 & 128— A complete, powerful, 
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Memo Card — Unleashes the power of a full- 
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Financial Planner— Answers all of those ques- 
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REVIEWS 



speech capability, an optional under- 
line mode lets your youngster follow 
along with the reader. Turn off the 
speech capabilities, and you still have 
three excellent stories beginning read- 
ers will love to recite to any parent 
willing to sit and listen. If you like, 
you can instruct the program to ask 
questions every few screens^ just to 
make sure your child is really paying 
attention. Speech and music can be 
enhanced using a Covox Speech 
Thing, Creative Lab's SoundBlaster 
card, or the Ad Lib music card. 

For all of its drama, sound, and 
graphics, however, Storyteller also has 
some omissions. For example, there's 
no printer support. Also, despite the 
generally excellent quality of the digi- 
tized voice, the speech routine is 
much too fast for preschoolers, even 
when slowed down by 20 percent. 
Skipped words or slurred speech, de- 
signed to provide dramatic highlights, 
often confuse beginning readers who 
must read every word. On a more aca- 



demic level, the program's linear de- 
sign doesn't take full advantage of the 
PC's ability to create an interactive 
environment. 




hciv«," r><iid Littic Rt-d Ftidm^ Hood 
rtith." the wol f ^uid 



Little Red Riding Hood and the big bad 
wolf meet the electronics age. 

Whether you and your child en- 
joy the Storyteller depends a lot on 
your child's natural inclinations. Kids 

who enjoy the security of knowing 
what will happen in a story won't 
mind the program's linearity. It's fun 
to read the stories out loud, and the 



clever animations are fun to watch. 
The reward sequences that come 
when children answer the questions 
correctly are positively enchanting. 
Children who are knowledgeable com- 
puter users may become bored after 
the initial thrill of hearing the com- 
puter talk. Parents will have to consid- 
er these factors when weighing the 
difference between this entertaining 
program and the hardcopy books that 
it brings to the PC. 

LESLJEEISER 



IBM PC and compatbles, 384K RAM, 
CGA, EGA. or VGA support— $49.95 
Also available for the Apple IIgs (S49.95), 
MiHiken Storyteller Story Collection I, in- 
cluding "Jack and the Beanstalk,'* "Alad- 
din and the Magrc Lamp," and "Peter 
Rabbit." available tor $24.95 {Master 
Package required; also availabie for the 
Appte IIgs for $24.95). 

MILLIKEN PUBLISHING 
11 00 Research Blvd. 
St. Louis. MO 631 32 
(800)643-0008 



WITH THE UNUSED WUHERIAL STOCKPILED IN 
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IMAGEWRJTER II AS LOW AS $2.67 



COMPUTE Classified is a low-cost way to tell over 355,000 micro- 
computer owners about your product or service. 
Additional Information. Please read carefully. 

Rates: $38 per line, minimum of four hnes. Any or all of the first line set in capital letters at no 
charge. Add $15 per line for boldface words, or $50 for the entire ad set in boldface (any num- 
ber of lines.) 

Terms: Prepayment is required. We accept checks, money orders, VISA, or MasterCard. 
Farm: Ads are subject to publisher's approval and must be either typed or legibly printed. One 
line equals 40 letters and spaces between words. Please underline words to be set in boldface. 
General Information: Advertisers using post office box number in their ads must supply per- 
manent address and telephone number. 

Orders will not be acknowledged. Ad will appear in next available issue after receipt. 
Closing: First of the second month preceding cover date (e.g. October issue closes August 1.) 
CLASSIFIED DISPLAY RATES 

Classified display ads measure 2%" wide and are priced according to height. 1" = S275; IVs" = 
$400; 2" = $525. Preferred supplied material is Velox or PMT. 
HOW TO ORDER 

To place an ad, send order and payment to Sharon Steinkemper, Classified Manager, 
COMPUTE, 1965 Broadway, New York, NY 10023-5965, or call Sharon Steinkemper at 212- 
724-0911, FAX 212-724-0825. 



M 



MAY 1991 



COMPUTE 159 




SNEAK PEEKS 



SPORTS 
S MULAnD 
BOX NG 

filled polygons have, over the last 
L few years, turned games like flight 
Jand driving simulations into fan- 
I taslic experiences of motion and 
color. Polygons allow games makers 
to create 3-D worlds where scale, 
speed, and fluidity of motion combine 
to create more realistic animated 
sequences. Broderbund has now 
brought that technology to sports sim- 
ulations, creating the Mike Tyson of 
computer boxing games. 

Sports Simulated Boxing cap- 
tures almost every element of profes- 
sional boxing for you to experience at 
your PC (except for the facial lacer- 
ations and brain swelling). The first 
thing you'll notice are the boxers 
themselves, shaped like some kind of 
weird cyborg fighters, not the smooth 
bitmapped figures adopted by most 
sport games. But once you see them in 
motion, all negative assumptions 
about the figures vanish. These guys 
move like real fighters, bobbing and 
weaving, attacking or retreating, 
throwing the jabs, uppercuts, rabbit 
punches, and roundhouses that wreak 
havoc on the head and body of the 
enemy. 

The game looks best on a VGA- 
equipp>ed machine, where the resolu- 
tion enhances the look of the fighters 
and their crisp movements on the 
screen. Digitized photos and detailed 
backgrounds add an extra dimension 
to the Spartan ring. The polygons, 
though disconcerting at first, become 
the anchor to the game's movement 
and gracefulness. 

Supporting the excellent and 
imaginative use of graphics is an ex- 
cellent and stirring theme song. Even 
better are the sounds of the hits and 
the grunts of the fighters as the blows 
come raining down. This is the kind 
of sound support owners of PC sound 



cards so rarely get in games. 

Sports Simulated Boxing is no 
street brawl; it's truly an innovation. 
For fight fans, the science was never 
quite so sweet. 

PETER SCISCO 



Scheduled Release: August t991 
For IBM PC and cx)mpatibl6S (80286 mini- 
mum). 640K RAM, and EGA or VGA— 
$49.95 (tentative) 

Broderbund Software 

17 Paul Dr. 

San Rafael, CA 94903-2101 

(415)492-3200 




^m^^mm 



Slug it out with your enemy face to face. 




'S 



The company that developed the 
first Windows paint program now 
brings you the most powerful 
Windows paint program: Publish- 
er's Paintbrush, The word publisher 
gives a clue to ZSoft's aspirations. 
This program is for professionals, and 
it can do almost anything possible you 
could want to do with bitmaps. 

Notable features include support 
for 256 colors, 256 gray scales, multi- 
ple windows, multiple palettes, a 
movable push-button toolbox {the 
first of its kind in any PC paint pro- 
gram), and the ability to load and save 
files in PCX (both monochrome and 
color), GIF, BMP (three flavors), 
Targa TGA, and TIFF formats. 

Paintbrush boasts more than 40 



painting tools, including everything 
you'd expect in a world-class paint 
program plus special tools for blend- 
ing, brightening, and replacing colors; 
drawing Bezier curves; filling and 
painting with gradients; lassoing im- 
ages; sharpening and smudging areas; 
and tinting. 

Two special retouching tools will 
be especially useful to artists. Cloning 
lets you replace one area of a picture 
with another using freehand strokes, 
and Eyedropper allows you to pick up 
colors from the picture itself so you 
can paint with them. 

Take these features, blend them 
together in a beautifully designed 
Windows interface, throw in support 
for every major scanner, add excellent 
online help, and you have a package 
no serious computer artist should be 
without. 

CLIFTON KARNES 



Scheduled Retease: March 1991 

For IBM PC and compatibles— $495.00 

ZSoft 

450 Franklin Road, Ste. 100 
Marietta, GA 30067 
(404) 42S-00O8 



rT^^^!^!^^^^^ 


— '.1-:^^: - ■ 


t 




p>i-^^^^^^^^HH^H||^P 


rsL 


nSHBBdH^^i^ 



Pubiisher's Paintbrush lets you work with 
paintings in multiple windows. 



What Are Sneak Peeks? 

Sneak Peeks are advanced reviews of 
upcoming software and hardware prod- 
ucts. Every effort is made to ensure that 
the information contained in these re- 
views is accurate at the time they are 
published. COMPUTE will review the fi- 
nal edition when it becomes available. 



160 COMPUTE 



MAY 1991 




^^"<^ 



^ 



Ad Lib Sound. Listen, anlyorfll never 
see your games the same way again, ji 




SCR-E-E-E-CCH!! Your wheels lock up and squeal as 
you fly into the hairpin turn. 

BA-BOOM . . . BA-BOOMI You bob and weave furiously 
to avoid the deafening and deadly anti-aircraft guns. 

TA DA-DA DAAA! And that black hole seems a whole 
lot darker with this music playing. 
What?! You mean your games don't sound anything like 
^ Then listen up, because you need the Ad Lib Card. It's the 
digital synthesizer card that makes your games come alive! 
Check this out Ad Lib brings room-filling music and a huge range of 
digitized and synthesized sound effects right to your favorite PC games. 
No more beeps and buzzes-the Ad Lib Sound is rich and full. 



In fact Ad Lib sounds so awesome, it's become the industry standard 
for PC games. Today's top publishers are creating fantastic new games 
using Ad Lib Sound right now. But accept no substitutes— because 
when it comes to sounding great and working with the hottest games, 
no one can touch Ad Lib. 

Look for ads and games that have the "Ad Lib Sound" sticker 
or logo at your software dealer. Or call us for the ever-growing 
list of games with spectacular Ad Lib Sound at 1-800-463-2686. 

Add the missing dimension to your games with the Ad Lib 
Card. Then get ready to open your ears, and blow your mind. 



IBM PC and Micro Channel versions available. 




Ad Lib Inc., 50 Staniford Street, Suite 800, Boston, MA 02114. t-800-463-2686 in U,S. or Canada. 1-418-529-9676 JnternationsL Fax: M7ff-52S-ff59. 



AdLiK 






New Games 
with Ad Lib 
Sound. ^^ 

Here are just some of today's 

hottest games lliat use the mus-^^- 

Ad Lib Card: hres forget 





^rk^ 



Electronic Arts' 
Emperium'-' 





The Learning Company'tV 

. Super Sotvcrs -' 

Treasure Mountainr 



Sir-Tectt's 

Wizardry : Bane ol Ihe 

Cosmic Forge 



System Requirements: IBM ^ PC, XT, AT, 386, 486 or compatible with 256K RAM, DOS 2.0 or higher, CGA, EGA, VGA, MGA or IBM PS/2, and headset or external speaker. 
© 1931 Ad Lib. Ad Lib is a registered trademark of Ad Lib Inc. IBM is a registered trademark of fnternatior.ul Business Macliines Corporation. 



Circte Readef Service ^fllmbe^ 214 




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Breathtaking Graphics... 



heart of China's backgrounds 

are stunning in their realism 
and romantic period flavor. 
These pictures recreate the 
historic feeling of 1920's 
revolutionary China anrf 
other exotic game 
locations. All game 
characters are 
digitized from live 
actors for the ulti- 
mate in visual 
realism. 



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Get this terrific Heart of China T-shirt 
FREE when you order Heart of China 
direct from Sierra ~ t>e sure to mention 
this Compute Magazine Special Offer - 
or send us your original dealer's receipt 
for Heart of China and mention ttiis 
Compute Magazine Special Offer 
Please specify size: S, M, L. XL. 

*vvtmyan)iner 



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Superior Character 
Interaction.., 



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Ik-yJoo. 
W.iri! n drink? 



'At every point oi interaction; 

every casual conversation, you'll be 
establishing relationships with game 
characters that will affect future 
encounters and crucial game events. 
Each Heart of China character has a 
unique personality and a long memory. 



Adventure, Intrigue 

toMANCE... 






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^ 



You'll be propelled into the world 
' of Lucky Jake Masters^ Zhao Chi and 
Kate Lomax as they find themselves 
caught up in an international adven- 
ture that spans the globe from Hong 
Kong to Paris. 



-^ PART OF THE SIERRA FAMILY 

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Qal Toll -Free 

800-326-6654 

Circle Reader Service Number t9S